Discovery

Does Uber-Ancient Earth Water Mean ...

Does Uber-Ancient Earth Water Mean Life Started Earlier?

Just 14 million years after the start of the solar system, Earth and the rest of the inner planets were inundated with water, setting back the clock for when life could have evolved.
300 Feared Missing in Sri Lanka Mud...

300 Feared Missing in Sri Lanka Mudslides

At least 16 people are dead and hundreds missing after a landslide in central Sri Lanka.
Hawaiian Lava Flow Closes in on Hom...

Hawaiian Lava Flow Closes in on Homes: Photos

A 2,000-degree lava front inches closer to homes in the Hawaiian town of Pahoa, on Hawaii's Big Island.
Hydropower May Be Huge Source of Me...

Hydropower May Be Huge Source of Methane Emissions

What if reservoirs that store water and produce electricity were among some of the world's largest contributors of greenhouse gasses?
Tea Tastes Worse When It Rains Too ...

Tea Tastes Worse When It Rains Too Much

Too much rain can reduce the concentration of chemicals in tea that make it taste good, scientists have discovered.
Australia's Plan Won't Save Great B...

Australia's Plan Won't Save Great Barrier Reef: Scientists

The government's plans to protect the Great Barrier Reef can't prevent its decline, the country's pre-eminent grouping of natural scientists said Tuesday.

Yahoo Science

Gray wolf reported at Grand Canyon ...

Gray wolf reported at Grand Canyon for first time in decades

By Laura Zuckerman (Reuters) - A gray wolf was recently photographed on the north rim of the Grand Canyon in Arizona in what would be the first wolf sighting in the national park since the last one was killed there in the 1940s, conservation groups said on Thursday. There was no immediate word from the National Park Service on whether it had authenticated the sighting, but a spokeswoman for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Charna Lefton, said the agency was sending a team to try to capture the animal in question. ...
Skin-eating Asian fungus imperils w...

Skin-eating Asian fungus imperils world's salamanders

Handout photo of an Eastern red-spotted newt at the Jefferson National Forest in VirginiaBy Will Dunham WASHINGTON (Reuters) - A skin-eating fungus that infiltrated Europe through the global wildlife trade is threatening to inflict massive losses on the continent's native salamanders including extinction of whole species and could do the same in North America, scientists say. An international research team said on Thursday the fungus, first detected in Europe last year, has killed salamanders in the Netherlands and Belgium and is expected soon to reach other European nations. They said it is closely related to another fungus that already has wiped out some amphibian species. ...

Individual genetic differences may ...

Individual genetic differences may affect Ebola survival: study

Health workers pray at an Ebola treatment center run by Medecins Sans Frontieres in Monrovia, Liberia, on October 27, 2014By Julie Steenhuysen CHICAGO (Reuters) - Scientists have been puzzling for years over why some people survive Ebola while many others perish. A new study provides strong evidence that individual genetic differences play a major role in whether people die from the disease. Researchers at the University of Washington in Seattle reported their findings on Thursday in the journal Science. ...

Probe of Virginia rocket blast begi...

Probe of Virginia rocket blast begins; space station supplied

NASA handout photo of an aerial view of the Wallops Island launch facilities in Wallops Island, VirginiaBy Ian Simpson and Irene Klotz WALLOPS Va./CAPE CANAVERAL Fla. (Reuters) - Authorities on Wednesday started investigating what caused an unmanned U.S. supply rocket to explode in a fireball moments after liftoff from a Virginia launch pad, destroying cargo and equipment bound for the International Space Station. The 14-story Antares rocket, built and launched by Orbital Sciences Corp, blasted off from the NASA Wallops Flight Facility on Wallops Island at 6:22 p.m. (2222 GMT) on Tuesday but burst into flames moments later. ...

Magma 'Pancakes' May Have Fueled To...

Magma 'Pancakes' May Have Fueled Toba Supervolcano

Magma 'Pancakes' May Have Fueled Toba SupervolcanoThe most catastrophic volcanic eruption in the last 2 million years may owe its superpower to stacks of hot molten rock layered like the jelly filling inside a sky-high wedding cake. The magma layers, called sills, start about 4 miles (7 kilometers) below Indonesia's Toba volcano. The discovery suggests the volcano is fed by sills stacked underground between older rock layers, instead of a shallow magma pool such as those typically drawn in volcano cartoons, the researchers said. The study, published today (Oct. 30) in the journal Science, could help explain how supervolcanoes store enormous quantities of magma before their terrifying blasts.

US Salamander Hotspot Could Fall to...

US Salamander Hotspot Could Fall to New Disease

US Salamander Hotspot Could Fall to New DiseaseA newly described fungal disease is killing salamanders and newts in Europe and could soon land on U.S. The disease invades the skin of salamanders and newts, and is related to another fungus that has been wiping out frog and other amphibian populations around the world. "If it gets here, it's going to be really bad," said Karen Lips, a biologist at the University of Maryland who participated in the new research. That's because the United States is home to the world hotspot of salamander diversity: More species of salamander live in the southern Appalachian Mountains than anywhere else on the planet, according to the North Carolina-based Highlands Biological Station.

Physorg.com

Reddit launches crowdfunding platfo...

Reddit launches crowdfunding platform Redditmade

Reddit launched a crowdfunding tool Wednesday that gives users of the popular online forum a tailor-made alternative to Kickstarter and Indiegogo.
Google execs discuss regulation, in...

Google execs discuss regulation, innovation and bobble-heads

Eric Schmidt and Jonathan Rosenberg help run Google, one of the world's best-known, most successful - and most controversial - companies. They've just published a new book, "How Google Works," a guide to managing what they call "smart creatives," the technically proficient, innovation-savvy workers whom companies in every industry are trying to recruit and retain.
Developing the battery of the futur...

Developing the battery of the future

The search for the next generation of batteries has led researchers at the Canadian Light Source synchrotron to try new methods and materials that could lead to the development of safer, cheaper, more powerful, and longer-lasting power sources, to be used in almost everything, from vehicles to phones.
Gamers' funding fuels meteoric rise...

Gamers' funding fuels meteoric rise of 'Star Citizen'

Chris Roberts' brain spun out a grand vision: a rich, immersive galaxy; exquisite spaceships traversing between infinite star systems with thousands of computer gamers manning the cockpits, racing, dogfighting and defending humanity.
FCC chief proposes opening the pay-...

FCC chief proposes opening the pay-TV industry to tech firms

Federal Communications Commission Chairman Tom Wheeler wants to open the pay-TV industry to technology companies.
LinkedIn reports 3Q loss but sales ...

LinkedIn reports 3Q loss but sales climb

LinkedIn Corp. posted a third-quarter loss on Thursday, but its results were better than expected as revenue grew sharply, sending shares of the online professional networking service higher in extended trading.

PBS

Spinosaurus vs. Alligator

Spinosaurus vs. Alligator

A tame alligator named Bubba betrays the secrets of the largest predator that ever lived.
Killer Landslides

Killer Landslides

Explore the forces behind deadly landslides?and the danger zones for the next big one.
Zombies and Calculus

Zombies and Calculus

The zombie apocalypse is here, and calculus explains why we can't quite finish them off.
Zombies and Calculus, Part 2

Zombies and Calculus, Part 2

You're being chased by zombies, and understanding tangent vectors may save your life.
Bigger Than T. rex

Bigger Than T. rex

Meet ?the lost killer of the Cretaceous and the world's largest predator ever.
Emperor's Ghost Army

Emperor's Ghost Army

Explore the buried clay warriors, chariots, and bronze weapons of China's first emperor.

Scientific American

Ebola Exacerbates West Africa?s Pov...

Ebola Exacerbates West Africa?s Poverty Crisis

The virus spreading in Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone has led to food shortages and neglect of other devastating tropical illnesses -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
Small Wonders: 20 Winning Images De...

Small Wonders: 20 Winning Images Depict Life under the Microscope [Slide Show]

Nikon’s Small World photo competition celebrates its 40th anniversary -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
Remembering Polio Vaccine Developer...

Remembering Polio Vaccine Developer Jonas Salk a Century after His Birth

Routine clinical use of his vaccine forestalled the paralysis and death brought by the dreaded illness -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
NIH Proceeds with Caution on Sex Ba...

NIH Proceeds with Caution on Sex Balance in Biomedical Studies

The NIH is due to roll out new sex-balance policies this month. So far that's meant "carrot" rather than "stick" measures, and no clear date for changes to funding rules -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
Evidence Builds for Dark Matter Exp...

Evidence Builds for Dark Matter Explosions at the Milky Way?s Core

Unexplained gamma rays streaming from the galactic center may have been produced by dark matter, but more mundane explanations are also possible   -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
Lonesome George, the Last of His Ki...

Lonesome George, the Last of His Kind, Strikes His Final Pose

After the century-old giant tortoise died, Galápagos conservationists and a taxidermist had to figure out how to continue his legacy -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

Newscientist

Smoke without fire: What's the trut...

Smoke without fire: What's the truth on e-cigarettes?

They've been called safe, dangerous, a way to quit smoking – and a way to start. New Scientist sifts through the evidence about e-cigarettes (full text available to subscribers)
White noise for your nose cancels p...

White noise for your nose cancels pungent aromas

By combining compounds in just the right mixture, researchers have worked out how to produce the olfactory equivalent of white noise
Left or right-wing? Brain's disgust...

Left or right-wing? Brain's disgust response tells all

People sensitive to disgust are more likely to be conservative – so much so that their brain's response to a disgusting image can predict political leaning
Earth's blue beauty glimpsed from f...

Earth's blue beauty glimpsed from far side of the moon

China's Chang'e 5-T1 spacecraft captures a stunning image of our planet hanging in space next to the looming moon as it heads back home
Spoiler-free guide to the science o...

Spoiler-free guide to the science of Interstellar

With physics grand-master Kip Thorne doing the science, Interstellar promises to be the most fact-packed blockbuster of the year. Time to brush up
Today on New Scientist

Today on New Scientist

All the latest on newscientist.com: screen vs paper, TTIP, brain decoder, computers that see like we do, supernova shock waves and more

NY times.com Science

Threat of Lawsuit Could Test Maine?...

Threat of Lawsuit Could Test Maine?s Quarantine Policy

Kaci Hickox, a nurse who treated Ebola patients in Africa, said she would go to court if she is not freed by Thursday, heightening a debate on how to balance public health and public fears.
In U.S. Cleanup Efforts, Accident a...

In U.S. Cleanup Efforts, Accident at Nuclear Site Points to Cost of Lapses

As the United States aims to correct years of mishandling radioactive materials, the price of reopening a New Mexico waste repository could top $551 million.
Deadly Fungal Disease Threatening S...

Deadly Fungal Disease Threatening Salamanders May Spread Through Pet Trade

Fire-bellied newts imported from Asia may be spreading a fungal disease that is killing off fire salamanders in Europe and could easily spread to America, researchers say.
Genes Influence Ebola Infections in...

Genes Influence Ebola Infections in Mice, Study Suggests

For the first time, scientists have bred mice that developed Ebola infections resembling those in humans and found that genes affect how the animals react to the virus.
Matter: From Ancient DNA, a Clearer...

Matter: From Ancient DNA, a Clearer Picture of Europeans Today

New studies of genomes thousands of years old have allowed scientists to see bits of history playing out over time, revealing that Europeans today have genes from three very different populations.
Basics: Ebola and the Vast Viral Un...

Basics: Ebola and the Vast Viral Universe

By all evidence, researchers say, viruses like Ebola have been parasitizing living cells since the first cells arose on earth nearly four billion years ago. Some say that viruses actually invented cells.

Science Daily

NASA?s Wallops Flight Facility comp...

NASA?s Wallops Flight Facility completes initial assessment after Orbital launch mishap

The Wallops Incident Response Team completed today an initial assessment of Wallops Island, Virginia, following the catastrophic failure of Orbital Science Corp.'s Antares rocket shortly after liftoff at 6:22 p.m. EDT Tuesday, Oct. 28, from Pad 0A of the Mid-Atlantic Regional Spaceport at NASA's Wallops Flight Facility in Virginia.
First detailed picture of cancer-re...

First detailed picture of cancer-related cell enzyme in action on chromosome unit

New insight into the function of an enzyme related to the BRCA1 breast-cancer protein has been released by researchers. The study produced the first detailed working image of an enzyme in a group that is associated with many types of cancer. The researchers obtained the first crystal structure of a gene-regulation enzyme working on a nucleosome. The image reveals previously unknown information about how the enzyme attaches to its nucleosome target.
Same votes, different voting distri...

Same votes, different voting districts would alter election results in NC: Math study bolsters call for non-partisan redistricting reform

Researchers have developed a mathematical model that shows how changes in congressional voting districts affect election outcomes. Focusing on the last election, they show the outcome of the 2012 US House of Representatives elections in North Carolina would have been very different had the state's congressional districts been drawn with only the legal requirements of redistricting in mind. The researchers hope the study will bolster calls for redistricting reform in 2016.
Running robots of future may learn ...

Running robots of future may learn from world's best two-legged runners: Birds

With an eye toward making better running robots, researchers have made surprising new findings about some of nature's most energy efficient bipeds -- running birds. Their skills may have evolved from the time of the dinosaurs and they may now be superior to any other bipedal runners -- including humans.
Case study: Hearing loss in one inf...

Case study: Hearing loss in one infant twin affects mother's speech to both babies

Is it possible that hearing loss in one infant from a pair of twins can affect the mother?s speech to both infants? A new acoustics study zeroes in on this question and suggests that not only is this alteration of speech entirely possible, but that mothers speak to both infants as if they are hearing impaired.
The science of charismatic voices: ...

The science of charismatic voices: How one man was viewed as authoritarian, then benevolent

When a right-wing Italian politician named Umberto Bossi suffered a severe stroke in 2004, his speech became permanently impaired. Strangely, this change impacted Bossi?s perception among his party?s followers -- from appearing authoritarian to benevolent. Now researchers think they know why.

Eureka Alert

Himalayan Viagra fuels caterpillar ...

Himalayan Viagra fuels caterpillar fungus gold rush

(Washington University in St. Louis) Overwhelmed by speculators trying to cash-in on a prized medicinal fungus known as Himalayan Viagra, two isolated Tibetan communities have managed to do at the local level what world leaders often fail to do on a global scale -- implement a successful system for the sustainable harvest of a precious natural resource, suggests new research from Washington University in St. Louis.
Celebrating the work of the 2014 No...

Celebrating the work of the 2014 Nobel Laureates

(Wiley) John Wiley & Sons, Inc., would like to congratulate all of the 2014 Nobel laureates and is proud to have published work by nine of the laureates. To celebrate their achievements Wiley has made a selection of content from the 2014 winners free to access until the end of the year.
Nearly $1 million NSF grant will su...

Nearly $1 million NSF grant will support UT Arlington doctoral students

(University of Texas at Arlington) A new grant from the National Science Foundation will help UT Arlington's Bridge to the Doctorate program increase diversity in science and engineering.
What do American babies eat? A lot ...

What do American babies eat? A lot depends on Mom's socioeconomic background

(University at Buffalo) Pediatrics researchers at the University at Buffalo have found that dietary patterns of babies vary according to the racial, ethnic and educational backgrounds of their mothers.
Winners of the 2014 Semantic Web Ch...

Winners of the 2014 Semantic Web Challenge announced at the International Semantic Web Conference

(Elsevier) The winners of the 2014 Semantic Web Challenge have been announced. Selected by a jury of leading experts in the computer science discipline from both academia and industry, winners were announced at the International Semantic Web Conference held in Riva del Garda, Italy, this month. Both the challenge and awards were sponsored by Elsevier.
Young adults ages 18 to 26 should b...

Young adults ages 18 to 26 should be viewed as separate subpopulation in policy and research

(National Academy of Sciences) Young adults ages 18-26 should be viewed as a separate subpopulation in policy and research, because they are in a critical period of development when successes or failures could strongly affect the trajectories of their lives, says a new report from the Institute of Medicine and National Research Council.

Forteantimes

Wed 29 Oct - Daily round-up of the ...

Wed 29 Oct - Daily round-up of the world's weird news

London museum planned to shoot and steal Nessie, Iceland offers Minge Pies for Christmas, plus a ghost in the bathtub
Mon 27 Oct - Daily round-up of the ...

Mon 27 Oct - Daily round-up of the world's weird news

Literary argument ends in death, tiger sex spoof video nightmare, man calls suicide hotline and is shot dead by SWAT team
Thur 23 Oct - Daily round-up of the...

Thur 23 Oct - Daily round-up of the world's weird news

Sex toy clown attack, Hitler coffee creamer PR disaster, man fights off bear with old computer, return of the Swedish mystery subs
Tue 21 Oct - Daily round-up of the ...

Tue 21 Oct - Daily round-up of the world's weird news

Cannabis-eating sheep munch 4,000 worth of drugs, mystery clowns in Portsmouth and France, flying man baffles plane passengers
Fri 17 Oct - Daily round-up of the ...

Fri 17 Oct - Daily round-up of the world's weird news

Grandma texts from beyond the grave, smugglers stuff 25 cows into oil tanker, man admits to having sex with 700 cars
Wed 15 Oct - Daily round-up of the ...

Wed 15 Oct - Daily round-up of the world's weird news

Crabzilla conquers the Internet, giant squid attacks Greenpeace, missing parrot returns after four years speaking Spanish

Howstuffworks

The Most Embarrassing Moments in th...

The Most Embarrassing Moments in the History of Science

What? Scientists get things wrong? We know. It?s shocking to hear, but science isn?t always an exact science. Mistakes do happen -- and they often lead to great scientific discoveries. So, grab your safety glasses and see if you can identify the most embarrassing scientific moments ever.
10 Completely False ?Facts? Everyon...

10 Completely False ?Facts? Everyone Knows

The blood in your veins is blue. Glass is a slow-moving liquid. If you touch a baby bird, its mother will abandon it. Not so fast ?- if you learned any of those "facts" in school, what you learned was wrong.
Flight Pictures

Flight Pictures

Flight pictures show photos from aviation history. Take a look at pictures of the most important aircraft in history.
How the Electoral College Works

How the Electoral College Works

The Electoral College is not an Ivy League school. Rather, it's a process for selecting the next U.S. president that actually carries more weight than the popular vote. Why is it there and should it be continued?
What is a Nor'easter?

What is a Nor'easter?

Nor'easters typically affect the east coast of the United States during the winter season. What exactly are Nor'easters, though, and how do they form. Find out the answer to this question in this article from HowStuffWorks.

Unexplained-mysteries

Amelia Earhart plane fragment ident...

Amelia Earhart plane fragment identified

Researchers believe that they have conclusively identified a piece of the aviation pioneer's aircraft. The disappearance of Amelia Earhart while flyin...
Former Area 51 scientist claims UFO...

Former Area 51 scientist claims UFOs are real

Boyd Bushman revealed information on UFOs and ET visitation during an interview shortly before his death. Bushman, who died on August 7th, worked at L...
Time travel could happen within 100...

Time travel could happen within 100 years

Physicists have predicted that time travel and teleportation could become a reality this century. Scientists from Imperial College London and the Univ...
Giant tortoises make 'miraculous' r...

Giant tortoises make 'miraculous' recovery

Where once there were just 15 Espanola giant tortoises left there are now more than 1,000. Two years ago the last of the Pinta Island tortoises, Lones...
UK favors belief in ghosts and ET o...

UK favors belief in ghosts and ET over God

A new survey has revealed that more people in Britain believe in aliens and the paranormal than in God. Interest in the unexplained has been on the ri...
ISS supply rocket explodes after li...

ISS supply rocket explodes after liftoff

A US rocket bound for the International Space Station has exploded just seconds after launching. Built by Orbital Sciences Corp, the 14-story Antares ...

Sciencenewsforkids.org

Will water woes leave Americans thi...

Will water woes leave Americans thirsty?

In the United States, people often assume that clean water will always be available. But factors ranging from global warming to pollution have begun threatening drinking-water supplies.
Questions for Will water woes leave...

Questions for Will water woes leave Americans thirsty?

Classroom questions for Will water woes leave Americans thirsty?
Teen stitches up a Broadcom win

Teen stitches up a Broadcom win

Holly Jackson, 14, of San Jose, Calif., grabs top honors ? and a $25,000 award ? in the finals of the Broadcom MASTERS competition.
A cane that can ?see?

A cane that can ?see?

Pre-teen?s invention clips onto a blind person?s cane and detects objects in a person?s path, helping them to avoid trip hazards.
Teen studies living flashlights of ...

Teen studies living flashlights of the deep

A teen studies a cryptic fish to better understand when and why it flashes its bacterial glow.
Stone Age stencils: Really old art

Stone Age stencils: Really old art

Scientists thought that cave art started in Europe. New analyses now dash that assessment. Stencils in an Indonesian cave are every bit as old as the better-known drawings in caves in France and Spain.

PopSci

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