Discovery

Could Clay Help Attack Superbugs?

Could Clay Help Attack Superbugs?

The ancient remedy could provide a new weapon against microbes Continue reading ?
DNews: The Dreaded Turbulence: What...

DNews: The Dreaded Turbulence: What Makes Flights Bumpy

Most of us probably breathe a sigh of relief when the captain promises "a smooth ride" to wherever we're flying. But, as DNews explains, turbulence is really no big deal.
Why Antarctic Sea Ice Isn't Shrinki...

Why Antarctic Sea Ice Isn't Shrinking

Winds, currents and seafloor features may be responsible for keeping Antarctica's sea ice intact.
Why Is India's Heat Wave Off the Ch...

Why Is India's Heat Wave Off the Chart?

An oppressive heat wave in India led to a record temperature of 123.8 degrees Fahrenheit -- the highest ever in Asia.
Live on a Farm by the Sea for Just ...

Live on a Farm by the Sea for Just $1.50

A four-bedroom bungalow and 416 sheep are all covered by the annual rent. Scenic views available at no additional cost. Continue reading ?
US: 1 in 8 Swimming Pools Closed fo...

US: 1 in 8 Swimming Pools Closed for Health Violations

One in eight swimming pools in five populous states are closed upon inspection due to dirty and potentially dangerous water, the CDC reported this week. Continue reading ?

Yahoo Science

Thousands skip school again to go t...

Thousands skip school again to go to Belgium climate protest

Thousands skip school again to go to Belgium climate protestBRUSSELS (AP) ? More than 10,000 students skipped school again in Belgium to join a march demanding better protections of the globe's fragile climate.


Invest in health for global securit...

Invest in health for global security and growth, Gates urges donors

Invest in health for global security and growth, Gates urges donorsEnding epidemics of infectious diseases such as malaria, polio, HIV and malaria is proving tough, they said, but dramatic progress made by global aid mechanisms recent decades means the world's people are now healthier and more productive. "The data has been really striking," Melinda Gates told reporters on a teleconference. "A child born today is half as likely to die before the age of five, compared to if she was born in 2000," Melinda Gates said.


Hitachi freezes UK nuclear project ...

Hitachi freezes UK nuclear project as Brexit crisis deepens

Hitachi freezes UK nuclear project as Brexit crisis deepensTOKYO/LONDON (Reuters) - Japan's Hitachi Ltd <6501.T> decided on Thursday to freeze a 3 trillion yen ($28 billion) nuclear power project in Wales as Britain scrabbles for a way to exit the European Union, dealing a blow to UK plans for the replacement of aging plants. The suspension comes as Hitachi's Horizon Nuclear Power failed to find private investors for its plans to build a plant in Anglesey, which was expected to provide about 6 percent of Britain's electricity.


Gloomy forecast for Davos: crises a...

Gloomy forecast for Davos: crises aplenty, but few world leaders

Gloomy forecast for Davos: crises aplenty, but few world leadersAn array of crises will keep several world leaders away from the annual World Economic Forum in Davos next week, which takes place against a backdrop of deepening gloom over the global economic and political outlook. Anxiety over trade disputes, fractious international relations, Brexit and a growth slowdown that some fear could tip the world economy into recession are set to dominate the Jan. 22-25 Alpine meeting and the mood will be somber. The WEF's own Global Risks Report set the tone this week with a stark warning of looming economic headwinds, in part due to geopolitical tensions among major powers.


Scientists reveal 'ideal diet&#...

Scientists reveal 'ideal diet' for peoples' and planet's health

Scientists reveal 'ideal diet' for peoples' and planet's healthScientists have unveiled what they say is an ideal diet for the health of the planet and its people - including a doubling of consumption of nuts, fruits, vegetables and legumes, and a halving of meat and sugar intake. If the world followed the "Planetary Health" diet, the researchers said, more than 11 million premature deaths could be prevented each year, while greenhouse gas emissions would be cut and more land, water and biodiversity would be preserved. "The food we eat and how we produce it determines the health of people and the planet, and we are currently getting this seriously wrong," said Tim Lang, a professor at Britain's University of London who co-led the research.


Climate Change Denial Is The Moral ...

Climate Change Denial Is The Moral Choice That Defines Trump's GOP

Climate Change Denial Is The Moral Choice That Defines Trump's GOPSometimes blindness is an act of will -- and a revelation of character. So it


Physorg.com

World's oldest periodic table chart...

World's oldest periodic table chart found in St Andrews

A periodic table chart discovered at the University of St Andrews is thought to be the oldest in the world.
New study quantifies deep reaction ...

New study quantifies deep reaction behind 'superdeep' diamonds

Whether they are found in an engagement ring or an antique necklace, diamonds usually generate quick reactions from their recipients. Now, new research shows deep inside the Earth, fast reactions between subducted tectonic plates and the mantle at specific depths may be responsible for generating the most valuable diamonds.
Japan's Hitachi freezes British nuc...

Japan's Hitachi freezes British nuclear project

Hitachi said Thursday it would freeze construction of its stalled nuclear power station in Wales due to financing problems, a blow to Britain's nuclear strategy and a costly decision for the Japanese firm.
India gives Volkswagen 24 hours to ...

India gives Volkswagen 24 hours to pay Dieselgate fine

India's environmental court Thursday threatened Volkswagen executives with arrest and gave the German automaker a day to pay $14 million for violating pollution norms by fudging emission tests.
Siemens, Alstom raise doubts about ...

Siemens, Alstom raise doubts about mega merger

Confidence that the politically sensitive merger of their rail businesses would be waved through by the European Commission was ebbing at both Siemens and Alstom Thursday.
Robots can go all the way to Mars b...

Robots can go all the way to Mars but they can't pick up the groceries

Cambridge researchers are studying the interaction between robots and humans ? and teaching them how to do the very difficult things that we find easy.

PBS

What is the Coriolis Effect?

What is the Coriolis Effect?

The spinning of the Earth means we don't always see straight paths as straight.
Healing After Hurricane Maria

Healing After Hurricane Maria

Antonio Paris translates how to survive on other planets into surviving after Maria.
The Arecibo Observatory

The Arecibo Observatory

After Hurricane Maria, the Arecibo Observatory and its staff worked to rebuild its facility.
Profile: Priya Natarajan

Profile: Priya Natarajan

Theoretical Astrophysicist Priya Natarajan has loved atlases and maps since she was a little girl.
Profile: Rana el Kaliouby

Profile: Rana el Kaliouby

Rana el Kaliouby is on a mission to humanize technology with artificial emotional intelligence.
Volcano on Fire

Volcano on Fire

Climb into the crater of Nyiragongo, a seething and active African volcano.

Scientific American

Bitter Reality: Most Wild Coffee Sp...

Bitter Reality: Most Wild Coffee Species Risk Extinction Worldwide

Researchers surveyed the world’s 124 coffee species and found more than half are threatened

-- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
Fukushima Residents Return Despite ...

Fukushima Residents Return Despite Radiation

Eight years after the nuclear meltdown, wary citizens are moving back to contaminated homesteads—some not by choice

-- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
Proper Breathing Brings Better Heal...

Proper Breathing Brings Better Health

Stress reduction, insomnia prevention, emotion control, improved attention—certain breathing techniques can make life better. But where do you start?

-- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
The Kids (Who Use Tech) Seem to Be ...

The Kids (Who Use Tech) Seem to Be All Right

A rigorous new paper uses a new scientific approach that shows the panic over teen screen time is likely overstated

-- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
Solar Farms Shine a Ray of Hope on ...

Solar Farms Shine a Ray of Hope on Bees and Butterflies

A trend of planting wildflowers on solar sites could maintain habitat for disappearing bees and butterflies

-- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
New App Uses Sonar to Detect Opioid...

New App Uses Sonar to Detect Opioid Overdoses

The technology utilizes smartphone speakers and microphone to monitor breathing

-- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

Newscientist

Rational thinking is saving antibio...

Rational thinking is saving antibiotics ? it could work on Brexit too

The turning of the tide in the fight against bacterial resistance to antibiotics shows the benefits of clear thinking and leadership, and it could work for Brexit too
Songwriter AI emulates the Beatles ...

Songwriter AI emulates the Beatles with a little help from its friends

Many songwriters have honed their skills listening to the Beatles. Now AI has done the same by learning to write pop songs that mimic their style
Mathematician?s record-beating form...

Mathematician?s record-beating formula can generate 50 prime numbers

Figuring out the pattern of the primes is one of the long-standing mysteries of maths, and now there is a way to spit some out on demand
Engineered bacteria could mop up to...

Engineered bacteria could mop up toxic ammonia in the human gut

Toxic ammonia can build up in the guts of people with certain disorders ? probiotics containing bacteria engineered to break down the toxin could help
Robot dog taught itself to get back...

Robot dog taught itself to get back up when people kick it over

The ANYmal robot is about the size of a large dog. AI has taught it to stand up after being pushed over by researchers
Manatees, whales and turtles are co...

Manatees, whales and turtles are coming back from the brink in the US

The Trump administration has plans to weaken a key environmental law, but it has helped many marine animals avoid extinction

NY times.com Science

Trilobites: Watch These Stink Bugs ...

Trilobites: Watch These Stink Bugs Hatch in Unison

In terrifying synchrony, baby stink bugs all but explode to life.
Trilobites: When Fungi Fight Back

Trilobites: When Fungi Fight Back

A mushroom species was found to sense predators and sent warning signals to other parts of its body, but how it does that remains a mystery.
North Korea?s Less-Known Military T...

North Korea?s Less-Known Military Threat: Biological Weapons

Military analysts are increasingly concerned about the nation?s ?advanced, underestimated and highly lethal? bioweapons program.
There?s a Huge Ice Disk in a Maine ...

There?s a Huge Ice Disk in a Maine River. No, the Aliens Aren?t Coming.

Despite all the speculation, it?s not a landing zone for aliens. Scientists say the ice disks are an unusual but entirely natural phenomenon.
Rise of the Golden Jackal

Rise of the Golden Jackal

A species that was barely known in Europe now vastly outnumbers wolves there, and is rapidly spreading north and west.
Global Warming Is Helping to Wipe O...

Global Warming Is Helping to Wipe Out Coffee in the Wild

Researchers found that more than half of all species could vanish from the wild, and the implications for coffee?s survival in the era of climate change are huge.

Science Daily

Water, not temperature, limits glob...

Water, not temperature, limits global forest growth as climate warms

The growth of forest trees all over the world is becoming more water-limited as the climate warms. The effect is most evident in northern climates and at high altitudes where the primary limitation on tree growth had been cold temperatures. The research details the first time that changes in tree growth in response to current climate changes have been mapped at a near-global scale.
An ancient relative of humans shows...

An ancient relative of humans shows a surprisingly modern trait

A relative of modern humans that lived at least 104,000 years ago in northern China showed evidence of dental growth and development very similar to that of people today, a new study found.
Feathers: Better than Velcro?

Feathers: Better than Velcro?

The structures zipping together the barbs in bird feathers could provide a model for new adhesives and new aerospace materials, according to a new study. Researchers 3D printed models of the structures to better understand their properties.
Gastric bypass surgery may benefit ...

Gastric bypass surgery may benefit muscle strength more than previously thought

Gastric bypass surgery improves relative muscle strength and physical performance in people with obesity, according to a new study.
Full carbonate chemistry at the sit...

Full carbonate chemistry at the site of calcification in a tropical coral

Researchers have succeeded in directly measuring three key parameters necessary for skeleton formation in a live tropical coral. This way, they completely characterized the carbonate chemistry at the site of calcification.
High-speed supernova reveals earlie...

High-speed supernova reveals earliest moments of a dying star

An international team of researchers found evidence for the much theorized 'hot cocoon'.

Eureka Alert

Democratic governors have bold idea...

Democratic governors have bold ideas to transform health care: Harvard researchers

(Physicians for a National Health Program) Republican and Democratic governors have strikingly different visions for the future of health care, according to a new analysis published in the American Journal of Public Health. While Republican leaders favor maintaining or shrinking public health insurance programs, Democratic leaders are advancing several new proposals to expand public coverage, including 'public option' and single-payer health reforms.
U develops first dark sky studies m...

U develops first dark sky studies minor in the US

(University of Utah) The W. M. Keck Foundation has awarded $250,000 to the University of Utah to establish a new undergraduate minor in dark sky studies, the first of its kind in the United States. The minor is open to all students across the university who will explore issues through the lens of science, humanities, arts, and participate in field-based research.
New AI can detect urinary tract inf...

New AI can detect urinary tract infections

(University of Surrey) New AI developed at the University of Surrey could identify and help reduce one of the top causes of hospitalisation for people living with dementia: urinary tract infections (UTI).
Urbanization may hold key to tiger ...

Urbanization may hold key to tiger survival

(Wildlife Conservation Society) A new WCS-led study published in the journal Biological Conservation says the future of tigers in Asia is linked the path of demographic transition -- for humans.
Army researchers explore benefits o...

Army researchers explore benefits of immersive technology for soldiers

(U.S. Army Research Laboratory) Army researchers are exploring the benefits of immersive technology for warfighters. They have developed a platform to assess this technology called AURORA-MR.
New research confirms US Fed right ...

New research confirms US Fed right to hold news conferences after every meeting

(University of Toronto, Rotman School of Management) A policy intended to increase transparency at the US Federal Reserve may have done the opposite, setting markets up for unnecessary surprises, says a new study from the University of Toronto.

Forteantimes

Thur 20 Nov - Daily round-up of the...

Thur 20 Nov - Daily round-up of the world's weird news

Young boy claimed to be reincarnated Marine, four armed baby named God Boy by parents, Bumfight punk body part theft
Mon 17 Nov - Daily round-up of the ...

Mon 17 Nov - Daily round-up of the world's weird news

Philly Jesus goes ice skating, gets arrested, plus: human flesh pastry makers, Swastika bauble outrage and a pair of resurrections
Mon 10 Nov - Daily round-up of the ...

Mon 10 Nov - Daily round-up of the world's weird news

Quadruple amputee is armed and on the run; Man buys home, finds corpse inside; dowsers discover mass grave in Tunbridge Wells
Wed 29 Oct - Daily round-up of the ...

Wed 29 Oct - Daily round-up of the world's weird news

London museum planned to shoot and steal Nessie, Iceland offers Minge Pies for Christmas, plus a ghost in the bathtub
Mon 27 Oct - Daily round-up of the ...

Mon 27 Oct - Daily round-up of the world's weird news

Literary argument ends in death, tiger sex spoof video nightmare, man calls suicide hotline and is shot dead by SWAT team
Thur 23 Oct - Daily round-up of the...

Thur 23 Oct - Daily round-up of the world's weird news

Sex toy clown attack, Hitler coffee creamer PR disaster, man fights off bear with old computer, return of the Swedish mystery subs

Howstuffworks

The Most Embarrassing Moments in th...

The Most Embarrassing Moments in the History of Science

What? Scientists get things wrong? We know. It?s shocking to hear, but science isn?t always an exact science. Mistakes do happen -- and they often lead to great scientific discoveries. So, grab your safety glasses and see if you can identify the most embarrassing scientific moments ever.
10 Completely False ?Facts? Everyon...

10 Completely False ?Facts? Everyone Knows

The blood in your veins is blue. Glass is a slow-moving liquid. If you touch a baby bird, its mother will abandon it. Not so fast ?- if you learned any of those "facts" in school, what you learned was wrong.
Flight Pictures

Flight Pictures

Flight pictures show photos from aviation history. Take a look at pictures of the most important aircraft in history.
How the Electoral College Works

How the Electoral College Works

The Electoral College is not an Ivy League school. Rather, it's a process for selecting the next U.S. president that actually carries more weight than the popular vote. Why is it there and should it be continued?
What is a Nor'easter?

What is a Nor'easter?

Nor'easters typically affect the east coast of the United States during the winter season. What exactly are Nor'easters, though, and how do they form. Find out the answer to this question in this article from HowStuffWorks.

Unexplained-mysteries

Dispute erupts over Egyptian pyrami...

Dispute erupts over Egyptian pyramid stone

Egypt has condemned plans to display a stone from the Great Pyramid of Giza at a museum in Edinburgh. The stone, which was reportedly removed from Egy...
Next hadron collider to be four tim...

Next hadron collider to be four times larger

Scientists at CERN are planning a successor to the Large Hadron Collider with ten times the power. Built between 1998 and 2008 in collaboration with m...
Huge rotating ice disk appears in W...

Huge rotating ice disk appears in Westbrook

The enormous circle of ice formed in freezing weather in the Presumpscot River on Tuesday afternoon. Believed to be approximately 100 yards in diamete...
The human brain retrieves memories ...

The human brain retrieves memories backwards

A new study has revealed that the human brain actually works in reverse when recalling details of our memories. The research, which was conducted by r...
Cotton seeds have started growing o...

Cotton seeds have started growing on the Moon

In a world first, seeds carried to the Moon aboard China's Chang'e 4 spacecraft have actually started to sprout. Contained within a sealed miniature b...
8ft Bigfoot statue prompts spate of...

8ft Bigfoot statue prompts spate of sightings

A new permanent resident of the North Carolina town of Mocksville has been raising more than a few eyebrows. With its tall, dark appearance and glowin...

Sciencenewsforkids.org

That?s no dino!

That?s no dino!

Not all ancient reptiles were dinosaurs. Some soared, many swam the seas and still others looked like dinos?but actually weren?t.
Questions for ?That?s no dino!?

Questions for ?That?s no dino!?

Questions for ?That?s no dino!?
A germ stopper for blood products

A germ stopper for blood products

A new system can disable almost all viruses or bacteria that are lurking in donated blood platelets and plasma.
MERS virus hits South Korea hard

MERS virus hits South Korea hard

MERS ? a killer viral disease ? emerged for the first time only three years ago. That was in the Middle East. Now it has spread to Asia.
Explainer: What is a virus?

Explainer: What is a virus?

Viruses cause many of the world?s common diseases. These germs reproduce by hijacking the cells of their host.
Gulf oil spill: Still poisoning dol...

Gulf oil spill: Still poisoning dolphins to crickets

Once the 2010 Deepwater Horizon spill ended, oil continued to harm animals in the Gulf of Mexico. Five years later, it still may not be over, biologists worry.

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