Discovery

Polar Vortex Spiked U.S. CO2 Emissi...

Polar Vortex Spiked U.S. CO2 Emissions in 2013

Largely as a result of trying to keep warm from that Arctic chill, carbon dioxide emitted from burning energy in the U.S. increased 2.5 percent in 2013 over the previous year.
DNews: What Will Happen When the No...

DNews: What Will Happen When the North and South Poles Flip?

We've grown comfortable with our present-day magnetic north and south, but one day they're going to reverse. If that happens during our lifetime, what could we expect? Would it be the end of the world, or would we just have to redirect Santa's mail?
El Nino Brings Floods, Risks -- and...

El Nino Brings Floods, Risks -- and Opportunities

El Nino ups the odds of flooding in some spots, but that information could provide opportunities.
500-Year-Old Traces of Monster Hawa...

500-Year-Old Traces of Monster Hawaii Tsunami Discovered

Fragments of corals, shells and coarse sand in a natural sinkhole suggest that a mighty tsunami hit the Hawaiian Islands about 500 years ago.
Hot News: 2014 On Track to Become W...

Hot News: 2014 On Track to Become Warmest Year

The odds are good that 2014 will become the warmest year in the books, fueled by record ocean warmth.
California Lake Poisoned to Get Rid...

California Lake Poisoned to Get Rid of Invasive Fish

In San Francisco, officials are being forced to resort to a fish-killing chemical to get rid of a lake's invasive species. Continue reading ?

Yahoo Science

Comet makes rare close pass by Mars...

Comet makes rare close pass by Mars as spacecraft watch

Comet C/2013 A1, also known as Siding Spring, is seen as captured by Wide Field Camera 3 on NASA's Hubble Space TelescopeBy Irene Klotz NEW YORK (Reuters) - A comet from the outer reaches of the solar system on Sunday made a rare, close pass by Mars where a fleet of robotic science probes were poised for studies. Comet Siding Spring passed just 87,000 miles (140,000 km) from Mars, less than half the distance between Earth and the moon and 10 times closer than any known comet has passed by Earth, NASA said. ...

Greek archaeologists unearth head o...

Greek archaeologists unearth head of sphinx in Macedonian tomb

ATHENS (Reuters) - Archaeologists unearthed the missing head of one of the two sphinxes found guarding the entrance of an ancient tomb in Greece's northeast, as the diggers made their way into the monument's inner chambers, the culture ministry said on Tuesday. The tomb on the Amphipolis site, about 100 km (65 miles) from Greece's second-biggest city Thessaloniki, has been hailed by archaeologists as a major discovery from the era of Alexander the Great. They say it appears to be the largest ancient tomb to have been discovered in Greece. ...
23andMe, MyHeritage partner to comb...

23andMe, MyHeritage partner to combine DNA and family trees

TEL AVIV (Reuters) - Personal genetics company 23andMe and Israel's MyHeritage said on Tuesday they would collaborate to enable people to discover their heritage based on genetic ancestry and documented family history. California-based 23andMe, which is backed by Google, is a pioneer in the sale of home genetic tests and has more than 750,000 clients. It sells a $99 DNA test, from which it provides its customers ancestry-related genetic reports. MyHeritage helps families find their history with family tree tools and a library of more than 5.5 billion historical records. ...
Cell transplant helps paralyzed man...

Cell transplant helps paralyzed man walk with frame

Paralysed Man Walks Again After Cell TransplantBy Kate Kelland LONDON (Reuters) - A Bulgarian man who was paralyzed from the chest down in a knife attack can now walk with the aid of a frame after receiving pioneering transplant treatment using cells from his nose. The technique, described as a breakthrough by a study in the journal Cell Transplantation, involved transplanting what are known as olfactory ensheathing cells into the patient's spinal cord and constructing a "nerve bridge" between two stumps of the damaged spinal column. "We believe... ...

Humans should thank ancient Scottis...

Humans should thank ancient Scottish fish fossils for joy of sex

¿Es ésta la primera cópula con penetración de la historia?By Kate Kelland LONDON (Reuters) - Scientists studying fossils have discovered that the intimate act of sexual intercourse used by humans was pioneered by ancient armored fishes, called placoderms, about 385 million years ago in Scotland. In an important discovery in the evolutionary history of sexual reproduction, the scientists found that male fossils of the Microbrachius dicki, which belong to a placoderm group, developed bony L-shaped genital limbs called claspers to transfer sperm to females. Females, for their part, developed small paired bones to lock the male organs in place for ...

Ingrown Toenail? How to Snip It the...

Ingrown Toenail? How to Snip It the Right Way

Nobody likes ingrown toenails, and when you get one, your instinct may be to clip off the offending bit.

Physorg.com

Researchers offer taphonomic degrad...

Researchers offer taphonomic degradation processes for mammalian hair

(Phys.org) ?A team made up of researchers from the U.S. and Australia has put together what they describe as a complete outline of the taphonomic (post-mortem) degradation processes for mammalian hair. In their paper published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, the group outlines the current state of post-mortem analysis of mammalian hair, including human and also offers some opinions on possible misinterpretations at both crime and archeology sites.
Survey: Harassment a common part of...

Survey: Harassment a common part of online life

A new study confirms what many Internet users know all too well: Harassment is a common part of online life.
Global consumption an increasingly ...

Global consumption an increasingly significant driver of tropical deforestation

International trade with agricultural and wood products is an increasingly important driver of tropical deforestation. More than a third of recent deforestation can be tied to production of beef, soy, palm oil and timber. "The trend is clear, the drivers of deforestation have been globalized and commercialized", says assistant professor Martin Persson, Chalmers University of Technology.
Turning waste from whisky-making in...

Turning waste from whisky-making into fuel?Close to commercial reality?

A start-up company in Scotland is working to capitalize on the tons of waste produced by one of the country's most valued industries and turn the dregs of whisky-making into fuel. Celtic Renewables, formed in 2011, has refined its process based on a century-old fermentation technique and is now taking the next step toward a commercial plant, according to an article in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society.
Adaptive zoom riflescope prototype ...

Adaptive zoom riflescope prototype has push-button magnification

When an Army Special Forces officer-turned engineer puts his mind to designing a military riflescope, he doesn't forget the importance of creating something for the soldiers who will carry it that is easy to use, extremely accurate, light-weight and has long-lasting battery power.
An effective, cost-saving way to de...

An effective, cost-saving way to detect natural gas pipeline leaks

Major leaks from oil and gas pipelines have led to home evacuations, explosions, millions of dollars in lawsuit payouts and valuable natural resources escaping into the air, ground and water. But in a report in ACS' journal Industrial & Engineering Chemistry Research, scientists say they have developed a new software-based method that finds leaks even when they're small, which could help prevent serious incidents?and save money for customers and industry.

PBS

Killer Landslides

Killer Landslides

Explore the forces behind deadly landslides?and the danger zones for the next big one.
Zombies and Calculus

Zombies and Calculus

The zombie apocalypse is here, and calculus explains why we can't quite finish them off.
Zombies and Calculus, Part 2

Zombies and Calculus, Part 2

You're being chased by zombies, and understanding tangent vectors may save your life.
Bigger Than T. rex

Bigger Than T. rex

Meet ?the lost killer of the Cretaceous and the world's largest predator ever.
Emperor's Ghost Army

Emperor's Ghost Army

Explore the buried clay warriors, chariots, and bronze weapons of China's first emperor.
The Cybersecurity Lab

The Cybersecurity Lab

Take cybersecurity into your own hands by thwarting a series of increasingly sophisticated cyber attacks.

Scientific American

Ancient Halo Stars Cast the Milky W...

Ancient Halo Stars Cast the Milky Way?s First Light

Hubble spots a star in our galaxy’s halo that likely predates its oldest star clusters -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
Can Wild Pigs Ravaging the U.S. Be ...

Can Wild Pigs Ravaging the U.S. Be Stopped?

The USDA is spending $20 million to solve a pig problem that has spread to 39 states and counting -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
Island Nation Sets Up World?s First...

Island Nation Sets Up World?s First Crowdfunded Marine Protected Area

Palau raises over $50,000 to support the creation and enforcement of a Pacific Ocean no-fishing zone the size of France -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
Predatory Fish Have Declined by Two...

Predatory Fish Have Declined by Two Thirds in the 20th Century

First-of-its-kind analysis of hundreds of food web models shows that the decrease has mostly taken place since the 1970s -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
War Dogs: Canines of Many Talents

War Dogs: Canines of Many Talents

In this adapted excerpt from a new book, the author combines her experience with military working dogs and the science of dogs’ special abilities to make a case for our war dog force -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
How Did Nigeria Quash Its Ebola Out...

How Did Nigeria Quash Its Ebola Outbreak So Quickly?

What we can learn from the boot leather, organization and quick response times that stopped Ebola from spreading in this African nation -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

Newscientist

To defeat trolls, we need to do mor...

To defeat trolls, we need to do more than jail them

Changing entrenched attitudes that trivialise cyber-harassment against women will take more than harsh sentences, says law professor Danielle Citron
Brain barrier opened for first time...

Brain barrier opened for first time to treat cancer

Ultrasound has been used to open the brain's protective sheath in people with aggressive brain tumours – to deliver chemo drugs directly to cancer cells
Ban of vulture-killing drug in Indi...

Ban of vulture-killing drug in India is working

Use of a cattle drug that has devastated vulture populations in India is in decline, offering hope of recovery – but vultures in Europe may now be at risk
First Mars settlers may last only 6...

First Mars settlers may last only 68 days

The Mars One project aims to send people to the Red Planet, but a new analysis suggests oxygen poisoning from growing their own food could kill them
Could this bee love? Rekindling our...

Could this bee love? Rekindling our affection for bees

A charming and poetic account of apiculture in Mark Winston's Bee Time reminds us why an ancient partnership between humans and bees needs saving
Sleepy sun could make Mars trips de...

Sleepy sun could make Mars trips deadly

An unexpected lull in the sun's activity will let more cosmic radiation into the solar system, endangering astronauts on long interplanetary missions

NY times.com Science

Testing for Ebola Vaccines to Start...

Testing for Ebola Vaccines to Start Soon, W.H.O. Says

The plans signify that a response to the Ebola outbreak is finally gathering steam, but it is still unclear if any of these vaccines will work.
Ebola Prompts Universities to Tight...

Ebola Prompts Universities to Tighten Travel Rules

Several schools have allowed humanitarian exceptions to restrictions on trips to Liberia, Sierra Leone and Guinea, the countries most affected by the virus.
Procedure on Paralyzed Man Stirs Ho...

Procedure on Paralyzed Man Stirs Hope and Caution

A Polish man paralyzed from the chest down can use a walker and has some leg sensation after a novel treatment, a report says, but some experts warn against premature conclusions.
Ebola Outbreak Erodes Recent Advanc...

Ebola Outbreak Erodes Recent Advances in West Africa

Ebola is wiping away the small gains made in war-scarred parts of West Africa, potentially threatening the hard-won stability in a tinderbox part of the world.
Chief of Nuclear Regulatory Commiss...

Chief of Nuclear Regulatory Commission Will Leave Job That She Fought to Keep

Allison M. Macfarlane, the panel?s first geologist, said she would become the director of the Center for International Science and Technology Policy at George Washington University.
Demand Jumps for Protective Equipme...

Demand Jumps for Protective Equipment as Ebola Cases Spur Hospitals Into Action

Major manufacturers of protective equipment are increasing production as people across the United States brace for new potential cases of the virus.

Science Daily

Less-numerate investors swayed by c...

Less-numerate investors swayed by corporate report presentation effects

Less-numerate investors are more susceptible to style and presentation effects in corporate social responsibility reports, according to new research.
Predicting the predator threatening...

Predicting the predator threatening a squirrel by analyzing its sounds and tail movements

Biologists found the could quite accurately predict what type of predator was threatening a squirrel by analyzing its sounds and tail movements.
Two vessels from WWII convoy battle...

Two vessels from WWII convoy battle off North Carolina discovered: German U-boat 576 and freighter Bluefields found within 240 yards

Scientists have discovered two significant vessels from World War II's Battle of the Atlantic. The German U-boat 576 and the freighter Bluefields were found approximately 30 miles off the coast of North Carolina. Lost for more than 70 years, the discovery of the two vessels, in an area known as the Graveyard of the Atlantic, is a rare window into a historic military battle and the underwater battlefield landscape of WWII.
Survey shows what Americans fear mo...

Survey shows what Americans fear most

The Chapman Survey on American Fears included 1,500 participants from across the nation and all walks of life. The research team leading this effort pared the information down into four basic categories: personal fears, crime, natural disasters and fear factors.
Screening questions fail to identif...

Screening questions fail to identify teens at risk for hearing loss

Subjective screening questions do not reliably identify teenagers who are at risk for hearing loss, according to researchers. Their study results suggest that objective hearing tests should be refined for this age group to replace screening questions.
Rising above the risk: America's fi...

Rising above the risk: America's first tsunami refuge

Washington's coast is so close to the seismically active Cascadia Subduction Zone that if a megathrust earthquake were to occur, a tsunami would hit the Washington shoreline in just 25 minutes. One coastal community is preparing for such a disaster by starting construction on the nation's first tsunami evacuation refuge, large enough to shelter more than 1,000 people who are within 20-minute walking distance.

Eureka Alert

Lessons from the 'Spanish flu,' nea...

Lessons from the 'Spanish flu,' nearly 100 years later

(Michigan State University) Just in time for flu season, a new Michigan State University study of 'the mother of all pandemics' could offer insight into infection control measures for the flu and other epidemic diseases.
Individual metropolises now global ...

Individual metropolises now global political players

(Uppsala University) By providing the infrastructure that connects global flows and financial systems, major cities have increased their political power alongside the nation-states. In some cases, they are pursuing their own foreign policy in several areas. In her PhD thesis Kristin Ljungkvist, a researcher in housing and urban affairs, has studied the effects of this development and argues that certain risks should be heeded.
Adaptive zoom riflescope prototype ...

Adaptive zoom riflescope prototype has push-button magnification

(DOE/Sandia National Laboratories) Sandia National Laboratories announces a prototype of a Rapid Adaptive Zoom for Assault Rifles that would enable the user to zoom in and out at the push of a button without having to remove their eyes from their rifles. The prototype uses a patented adaptive zoom that changes the focal length of the lenses by varying their curvature.
Turning waste from whisky-making in...

Turning waste from whisky-making into fuel -- Close to commercial reality?

(American Chemical Society) A start-up company in Scotland is working to capitalize on the tons of waste produced by one of the country's most valued industries and turn the dregs of whisky-making into fuel. Celtic Renewables, formed in 2011, has refined its process based on a century-old fermentation technique and is now taking the next step toward a commercial plant, according to an article in Chemical & Engineering News, the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society.
Baden-Wuerttemberg Consortium signs...

Baden-Wuerttemberg Consortium signs pioneering agreement with Springer

(Springer) Starting January 2015, researchers, faculty members and students affiliated with colleges and universities in the German state of Baden-Wuerttemberg will have convenient access to 1,917 electronic journals published by Springer. The license will continue through the end of 2017. Furthermore, the state has purchased permanent archival rights to these journals back to 2003 for inclusion in the Baden-Wuerttemberg Archive. This will provide comprehensive, seamless and permanent access, directly complementing the Springer national license with Germany.
Harvard study offers first-ever loo...

Harvard study offers first-ever look at how NCAA concussion guidelines are followed

(Harvard University) Though most NCAA colleges and universities have created programs to help athletes deal with concussions, a new Harvard study has found that, when it comes to specific components of those plans, many institutions still lag behind accepted standards.

Forteantimes

Tue 21 Oct - Daily round-up of the ...

Tue 21 Oct - Daily round-up of the world's weird news

Cannabis-eating sheep munch £4,000 worth of drugs, mystery clowns in Portsmouth and France, flying man baffles plane passengers
Fri 17 Oct - Daily round-up of the ...

Fri 17 Oct - Daily round-up of the world's weird news

Grandma texts from beyond the grave, smugglers stuff 25 cows into oil tanker, man admits to having sex with 700 cars
Wed 15 Oct - Daily round-up of the ...

Wed 15 Oct - Daily round-up of the world's weird news

Crabzilla conquers the Internet, giant squid attacks Greenpeace, missing parrot returns after four years speaking Spanish
Mon 13 Oct - Daily round-up of the ...

Mon 13 Oct - Daily round-up of the world's weird news

California terrorised by copycat clowns, vampire grave found in Bulgaria, Donald Trump evicts golf resort ghost
Fri 25 July 2014 - Daily round-up o...

Fri 25 July 2014 - Daily round-up of the world's weird news

Police investigate creepy doorstep dolls, doctors remove 232 teeth from boy's mouth, Jesus takes the wheel and runs over motorcyclist
Fri 10 Oct - Daily round-up of the ...

Fri 10 Oct - Daily round-up of the world's weird news

Boy killed by plummeting sacrificial goat, oversized body sparks crematorium fire, dwarf poos on Hull council office floor in protest at discrimination

Howstuffworks

The Most Embarrassing Moments in th...

The Most Embarrassing Moments in the History of Science

What? Scientists get things wrong? We know. It?s shocking to hear, but science isn?t always an exact science. Mistakes do happen -- and they often lead to great scientific discoveries. So, grab your safety glasses and see if you can identify the most embarrassing scientific moments ever.
10 Completely False ?Facts? Everyon...

10 Completely False ?Facts? Everyone Knows

The blood in your veins is blue. Glass is a slow-moving liquid. If you touch a baby bird, its mother will abandon it. Not so fast ?- if you learned any of those "facts" in school, what you learned was wrong.
Flight Pictures

Flight Pictures

Flight pictures show photos from aviation history. Take a look at pictures of the most important aircraft in history.
How the Electoral College Works

How the Electoral College Works

The Electoral College is not an Ivy League school. Rather, it's a process for selecting the next U.S. president that actually carries more weight than the popular vote. Why is it there and should it be continued?
What is a Nor'easter?

What is a Nor'easter?

Nor'easters typically affect the east coast of the United States during the winter season. What exactly are Nor'easters, though, and how do they form. Find out the answer to this question in this article from HowStuffWorks.

Unexplained-mysteries

Can your birth season affect your m...

Can your birth season affect your mood ?

The time of the year in which you were born may play a role in determining your temperament as an adult. There has long been a connection between the ...
Man seen flying past plane window a...

Man seen flying past plane window at 3,500ft

The pilots of an Airbus 320 were left perplexed after they saw a man flying past their plane. The peculiar incident saw the figure approach to within ...
Doctors cure man's paralysis in wor...

Doctors cure man's paralysis in world first

Darek Fidyka has become the first person to walk again after having his spinal nerves completely severed. The 38-year-old had been paralyzed from the ...
Inventor develops hi-tech 'Air Umbr...

Inventor develops hi-tech 'Air Umbrella'

Inventor Chuan Wang from Nanjing has created a futuristic new version of the humble umbrella. The device, which produces a 'force field of air', works...
'Celtic cross' discovered in Mars p...

'Celtic cross' discovered in Mars photograph

A strange cross-shaped pattern with a circle around it has been spotted on the surface of Mars. There have been a lot of reports lately of anomalous o...
Mary Rose dog turns out to be male

Mary Rose dog turns out to be male

The ship's dog aboard the doomed vessel that sank 500 years ago has undergone DNA testing. The famous Mary Rose warship fought in several wars for Eng...

Sciencenewsforkids.org

Pills of frozen poop fight killer d...

Pills of frozen poop fight killer disease

Popping poop pills? Of course it sounds yucky. But researchers find it might just be one of the most effective ways to knock out a very serious ? and tough-to-kill ? intestinal disease.
Explainer: What is C. difficile?

Explainer: What is C. difficile?

Over the past two decades, these severe bacterial infections have evolved from a no-big-deal occurrence to a common, life-threatening problem.
News Brief: No hopping for these an...

News Brief: No hopping for these ancient ?roos

By hopping, today?s kangaroos can scoot swiftly through the countryside. That was not true for some of their ancient cousins. True giants, those now-extinct kangaroos would have walked on two feet ? and relied on their tippy-toes.
Sunlight might have put oxygen in E...

Sunlight might have put oxygen in Earth?s early air

High-energy bursts of ultraviolet light can break apart carbon dioxide, yielding oxygen gas. The experiment may mimic what happened on Earth billions of years ago.
How people have been shaping the Ea...

How people have been shaping the Earth

We are the dominant force of change on Earth. Some experts propose naming our current time period the ?Anthropocene? to reflect our impact.
Coming: The sixth mass extinction?

Coming: The sixth mass extinction?

Species are dying off at such a rapid rate ? faster than at any other time in human existence ? that many resources on which we depend may disappear.

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