Discovery

Is Alaska our future?

Is Alaska our future?

It?s an ideal laboratory -- or perhaps a harbinger -- of how climate change could affect the rest of the lower 48 states.
Test Tube News: How L.A.'s Pollutio...

Test Tube News: How L.A.'s Pollution Problem Stacks Up with Other Cities

Nobody walks in Los Angeles, and that means lots of cars, lots of exhaust, and a big smoggy sky. Where does L.A. rank among the globe's smog centers?
Earth Has More Than 1,500 Yet-Undis...

Earth Has More Than 1,500 Yet-Undiscovered Minerals

There are a lot more minerals than we know about, thanks to Earth's biological diversity Continue reading ?
Obama Changes Mt. McKinley to Denal...

Obama Changes Mt. McKinley to Denali, Restoring Native Name

Denali was renamed McKinley in 1896 for a future president, but local authorities worked to restore its traditional name.
How Wildfires Affect Your Health

How Wildfires Affect Your Health

As much of the U.S. West is experiencing wildfires, learn how these blazes can affect your health.
Algae Bloom's Psychedelic Swirls Ca...

Algae Bloom's Psychedelic Swirls Captured in New Photo

The bloom is comprised of Cyanobacteria, organisms that changed the face of Earth some 2.4 billion years ago.

Yahoo Science

Apollo astronaut Buzz Aldrin joins ...

Apollo astronaut Buzz Aldrin joins Florida university

Buzz Aldrin testifies at space competitiveness hearing on Capitol Hill in WashingtonBy Irene Klotz MELBOURNE, Fla. (Reuters) - Former astronaut Buzz Aldrin, one of the first Americans to land on the moon, will spearhead a new research institute in Florida aimed at paving a path toward Mars exploration and settlement, officials said on Thursday. The Buzz Aldrin Space Institute will be based at the Florida Institute of Technology, also known as Florida Tech, located about 40 miles (64 km) south of NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Melbourne. Aldrin, 85, wants to expand his long-term space exploration program that includes human spaceflight, robotics and science initiatives.

Pentagon teams up with Apple, Boein...

Pentagon teams up with Apple, Boeing to develop wearable tech

U.S. Defense Secretary Carter listens to questions during a news conference at the Pentagon in Arlington, VirginiaBy David Alexander MOUNTAIN VIEW, Calif. (Reuters) - U.S. Defense Secretary Ash Carter awarded $75 million on Friday to help a consortium of high-tech firms and researchers develop electronic systems packed with sensors flexible enough to be worn by soldiers or molded onto the skin of a plane. Carter said funding for the Obama administration's newest manufacturing institute would go to the FlexTech Alliance, a consortium of 162 companies, universities and other groups, from Boeing , Apple and Harvard, to Advantest Akron Polymer Systems and Kalamazoo Valley Community College.

Scientists solve mystery of polar b...

Scientists solve mystery of polar bear Knut's death

Journalists watch the full-sized polar bear Knut model covered with the original fur during the presentation to the media at the natural history museum in BerlinKnut, the star polar bear who was hand-reared at Berlin zoo after his mother rejected him, had a type of auto-immune inflation of the brain that is found in humans, scientists said on Thursday. Knut, who was just four when he drowned at the zoo in 2011, was reared by his keeper Thomas Doerflein. Knut had an epileptic fit and drowned in a pool in his enclosure.

German scientists find rare dinosau...

German scientists find rare dinosaur tracks

By Josie Le Blond BERLIN (Reuters) - German scientists have found an unusually long trail of footprints from a 30-tonne dinosaur in an abandoned quarry in Lower Saxony, a discovery they think could be around 145 million years old. "It's very unusual how long the trail is and what great condition it's in," excavation leader Benjamin Englich told Reuters at the site, referring to 90 uninterrupted footprints stretching over 50 meters. Englich said the elephant-like tracks were stomped into the ground sometime between 135 and 145 million years ago by a sauropod - a class of heavy dinosaurs with long necks and tails.
Massive Aztec human skull rack foun...

Massive Aztec human skull rack found in Mexico City

Matos Moctezuma, an archaeologist from Mexico's National Institute of Anthropology and History points to a drawing of the Templo Mayor Aztec complex, during a news conference at the Anthropology Museum in Mexico CityArcheologists have discovered a massive ceremonial skull rack from the heyday of the Aztec empire in the heart of Mexico City, a find that could shed new light on how its rulers projected power by human sacrifice, the team said on Thursday. The skull rack, known as a tzompantli in the Nahuatl language of the Aztecs, was used to display the bleached white craniums of sacrificed warriors from rival kingdoms, likely killed by priests atop towering temples that once stood nearby. Dug up behind the capital's colonial-era cathedral, the as yet partially uncovered skull rack was likely built between 1485 and 1502 and may have been about 112 feet (34 meters) long and 12 meters (40 foot) wide, lead archeologist Raul Barrera said.

Elusive Sea Creature with Hairy, Sl...

Elusive Sea Creature with Hairy, Slimy Shell Spotted After 31 Years

Elusive Sea Creature with Hairy, Slimy Shell Spotted After 31 YearsThe Allonautilus scrobiculatus, a species of mollusk in the same family as the nautilus, was spotted off the coast of Papua New Guinea in the South Pacific in early August, the scientists said. The Allonautilus' shell has been known to science since the 1700s. The Allonautilus is so rare likely because it is completely reliant on scavenging to survive, Ward said.

Physorg.com

Distant planet's interior chemistry...

Distant planet's interior chemistry may differ from our own

As astronomers continue finding new rocky planets around distant stars, high-pressure physicists are considering what the interiors of those planets might be like and how their chemistry could differ from that found on Earth. New work from a team including three Carnegie scientists demonstrates that different magnesium compounds could be abundant inside other planets as compared to Earth. Their work is published by Scientific Reports.
Butterfly wings help break the stat...

Butterfly wings help break the status quo in gas sensing

The unique properties found in the stunning iridescent wings of a tropical blue butterfly could hold the key to developing new highly selective gas detection sensors.
First global antineutrino emission ...

First global antineutrino emission map highlights Earth's energy budget

The neutrino and its antimatter cousin, the antineutrino, are the tiniest subatomic particles known to science. These particles are byproducts of nuclear reactions within stars (including our sun), supernovae, black holes and human-made nuclear reactors. They also result from radioactive decay processes deep within the Earth, where radioactive heat and the heat left over from the planet's formation fuels plate tectonics, volcanoes and Earth's magnetic field.
Neural algorithm gives photo master...

Neural algorithm gives photo masterpiece-style treatments

Computer scientists are intrigued about what computers can tell us about artistic masterpieces, from picking out forgeries to assessing artistic worth.
Tech Tips: Windows 10 privacy setti...

Tech Tips: Windows 10 privacy settings worth checking

Microsoft's new Windows 10 system offers more personalization than before, but it also collects more data than people might be used to on PCs, from contacts and appointments to their physical location and even Wi-Fi passwords.
Adapt or die: Arctic animals cope w...

Adapt or die: Arctic animals cope with climate change

When it comes to coping with climate change in the Arctic region, which is warming at three times the global average, some animals are more equal than others.

PBS

Dawn of Humanity

Dawn of Humanity

Deep in a South African cave, an astounding discovery reveals clues to what made us human.
A New Way to See the Brain

A New Way to See the Brain

Use just diapers and water to get the closest look at the brain yet.
Arctic Ghost Ship

Arctic Ghost Ship

An astonishing find could solve the mystery of Sir John Franklin?s lost expedition.
Waging Science on the High Seas

Waging Science on the High Seas

Doing science in the Arctic is tough. Here's why that's a good thing.
Space Pics That Amaze Scientists

Space Pics That Amaze Scientists

We asked scientists, ?What are your favorite images from space?? Here?s what they said.
Vaccines?Calling the Shots

Vaccines?Calling the Shots

Examine the science behind vaccinations, the return of preventable diseases, and the risks of opting out.

Scientific American

A Tribute to Oliver Sacks from Coll...

A Tribute to Oliver Sacks from Colleague and Friend Christof Koch

The famed neurologist–author found uniqueness in every patient and savored the miracle of existence, whether it be found in squirrel monkeys or people -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
Oliver Sacks, Who Depicted Brain-Di...

Oliver Sacks, Who Depicted Brain-Disorder Sufferers' Humanity, Dies

The prolific author–neurologist gave the world empathetic insights into disorders of the brain while also inspiring films, plays, an opera and likely many careers in medicine and brain science -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
"Molecular Tweeting" Could Hold the...

"Molecular Tweeting" Could Hold the Key to Busting Superbugs

A broader understanding of bacterial social networks might help scientists combat antibiotic resistance -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
Size Matters When It Comes to Cells...

Size Matters When It Comes to Cells' Vulnerability to Parkinson's

Neurons involved in Parkinson’s disease are especially susceptible to burnout because of their complex branching -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
Massive International Project Raise...

Massive International Project Raises Questions about the Validity of Psychology Research

When 100 past studies were replicated, only 39 percent yielded the same results -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
The Race to Save the Bonneville Sal...

The Race to Save the Bonneville Salt Flats from a Slushy Demise [Slide Show]

Racing fans, the government and a mining company search for ways to save Utah’s natural salt pan and its world-famous speedway -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

Newscientist

65 per cent of Europe?s electronic ...

65 per cent of Europe?s electronic waste is stolen or mismanaged

A two-year investigation into Europe's electronic waste found that 6.2 million tonnes was not disposed of safely, a danger to health and environment
NASA picks post-Pluto destination f...

NASA picks post-Pluto destination for New Horizons spacecraft

Fresh off its July flyby of Pluto, the New Horizons spacecraft is bound for a tiny object even further from the sun
Live cells stuck together like Velc...

Live cells stuck together like Velcro could mend broken hearts

Heart cells grown on a special mesh can be built up into living, beating tissue that could mend damage after heart attacks
Quantum weirdness proved real in fi...

Quantum weirdness proved real in first loophole-free experiment

A century-long debate about whether quantum mechanics described reality or masked a deeper layer, as Einstein suggested, has concluded ? quantum reality won
Zoologger: The tiny insects that ro...

Zoologger: The tiny insects that roar at each other like lions

Two types of mirid bug engage in roaring duels, possibly to establish dominance or attract females, but how they make the noise is unknown
Knotty network could have powered u...

Knotty network could have powered universe?s early growth spurt

The theory behind why cables get tangled could explain both cosmic inflation and why we experience only three dimensions of space

NY times.com Science

Op-Ed Contributor: Psychology Is No...

Op-Ed Contributor: Psychology Is Not in Crisis

Failure to replicate experiments is just how science works.
$79 for an Out-of-Date Book About a...

$79 for an Out-of-Date Book About a Modern NASA Logo

A Kickstarter campaign by two designers aims to bring back a space agency graphics standard book, published in 1976, that reflects ?modernist design thinking.?
Obama Makes Urgent Appeal in Alaska...

Obama Makes Urgent Appeal in Alaska for Climate Change Action

President Obama said at an international conference that ?we?re not acting fast enough,? challenging leaders and citizens to reduce emissions to ?protect the one planet that we?ve got while we still can.?
James L. Flanagan, Who Helped Make ...

James L. Flanagan, Who Helped Make Computers Talk, Dies at 89

Mr. Flanagan?s groundbreaking acoustics research paved the way for digital speech, whether welcomed or not.
Political Memo: 3,000 Miles From De...

Political Memo: 3,000 Miles From Denali, Ohio Fumes Over Renaming of Mount McKinley

The renaming created rare unity between Republican and Democratic Buckeyes against President Obama, and even rarer agreement from members of both parties in Alaska praising him.
Fossils Show Big Bug Ruled the Seas...

Fossils Show Big Bug Ruled the Seas 460 Million Years Ago

Earth's first big predatory monster was a weird water bug as big as Tom Cruise, newly found fossils show.

Science Daily

Slower melting ice cream in pipelin...

Slower melting ice cream in pipeline, thanks to new ingredient

Childhood memories of sticky hands from melting ice cream cones could soon become obsolete, thanks to a new food ingredient.
With tobacco, what you don't know c...

With tobacco, what you don't know can kill you sooner

The public shows ?considerable lack of knowledge? about the risk associated with different types of tobacco products, researchers say. What people can benefit from is knowing the varying levels of risk associated with different tobacco products, according to public health researchers, who found that a large number of people aren?t aware of the differences.
Brush-off: Researchers devise a hai...

Brush-off: Researchers devise a hairbrush that's easy to clean

A researcher is working to make everyday objects easier to maintain so they last longer and don?t end up in a landfill. His first such creation is an easy-to-clean hairbrush.
New approach to modeling Amazon sea...

New approach to modeling Amazon seasonal cycles developed

Engineers have developed a new approach, opposite to climate models, to correct inaccuracies using a high-resolution atmospheric model that more precisely resolves clouds and convection and parameterizes the feedback between convection and atmospheric circulation. The new simulation strategy paves the way for better understanding of the water and carbon cycles in the Amazon, enabling researchers to learn more about the role of deforestation and climate change on the forest, authors say.
Men who buy sex have much in common...

Men who buy sex have much in common with sexually coercive men

Men who buy sex have less empathy for women in prostitution than men who don't buy sex and are more likely to report having committed rape and other acts of sexual aggression, according to a new study. The study of 101 men in the Boston area who buy sex and 101 men who do not -- all of whom were promised confidentiality -- indicates that the perspective of sex buyers has similarities to that of sexual aggressors.
Human body has gone through four st...

Human body has gone through four stages of evolution

Research into 430,000-year-old fossils collected in northern Spain found that the evolution of the human body's size and shape has gone through four main stages.

Eureka Alert

Daily marijuana use among US colleg...

Daily marijuana use among US college students highest since 1980

(University of Michigan) Daily marijuana use among the nation's college students is on the rise, surpassing daily cigarette smoking for the first time in 2014.
What is a 'complete breakfast'? (vi...

What is a 'complete breakfast'? (video)

(American Chemical Society) It's the most important meal of the day. Or is it? Breakfast has been the topic of much debate. For years, we were told to eat a complete breakfast. But what does that even mean? Should a complete breakfast include eggs, or should you avoid them altogether? Does any of this apply to brunch? We settle all of your breakfast concerns in our latest Reactions video. Fire up the toaster, and watch it here: https://youtu.be/837yGlLsHVY.
Single mothers much more likely to ...

Single mothers much more likely to live in poverty than single fathers, study finds

(University of Illinois College of Agricultural, Consumer and Environmental Sciences) Single mothers earn significantly less than single fathers, and they are penalized for each additional child they have even though the income of single fathers remains the same or increases with each added child in their family. Men also make more for every additional year they invest in education, further widening the gender gap, reports a University of Illinois study.
Gene leads to nearsightedness when ...

Gene leads to nearsightedness when kids read

(Columbia University Medical Center) Vision researchers at Columbia University Medical Center have discovered a gene that causes myopia, but only in people who spend a lot of time in childhood reading or doing other 'nearwork.'
Dialect influences Appalachian stud...

Dialect influences Appalachian students' experiences in college

(North Carolina State University) NC State linguist says language diversity isn't always celebrated on campus and calls dialect the 'last acceptable personal trait to make fun of.'
Top university teacher influencing ...

Top university teacher influencing how high school physics will be taught

(University of Missouri-Columbia) Meera Chandrasekhar, a professor of physics at the University of Missouri, received a $5 million multi-year grant from the NSF to address science instruction challenges. She developed a hands-on physics course for ninth graders designed to give them a better chance at being successful in higher-level science courses. The handheld tablet and computer-based curriculum application modules called 'Exploring Physics' were developed through this grant and have just become available for instructors and students.

Forteantimes

Thur 20 Nov - Daily round-up of the...

Thur 20 Nov - Daily round-up of the world's weird news

Young boy claimed to be reincarnated Marine, four armed baby named God Boy by parents, Bumfight punk body part theft
Mon 17 Nov - Daily round-up of the ...

Mon 17 Nov - Daily round-up of the world's weird news

Philly Jesus goes ice skating, gets arrested, plus: human flesh pastry makers, Swastika bauble outrage and a pair of resurrections
Mon 10 Nov - Daily round-up of the ...

Mon 10 Nov - Daily round-up of the world's weird news

Quadruple amputee is armed and on the run; Man buys home, finds corpse inside; dowsers discover mass grave in Tunbridge Wells
Wed 29 Oct - Daily round-up of the ...

Wed 29 Oct - Daily round-up of the world's weird news

London museum planned to shoot and steal Nessie, Iceland offers Minge Pies for Christmas, plus a ghost in the bathtub
Mon 27 Oct - Daily round-up of the ...

Mon 27 Oct - Daily round-up of the world's weird news

Literary argument ends in death, tiger sex spoof video nightmare, man calls suicide hotline and is shot dead by SWAT team
Thur 23 Oct - Daily round-up of the...

Thur 23 Oct - Daily round-up of the world's weird news

Sex toy clown attack, Hitler coffee creamer PR disaster, man fights off bear with old computer, return of the Swedish mystery subs

Howstuffworks

The Most Embarrassing Moments in th...

The Most Embarrassing Moments in the History of Science

What? Scientists get things wrong? We know. It?s shocking to hear, but science isn?t always an exact science. Mistakes do happen -- and they often lead to great scientific discoveries. So, grab your safety glasses and see if you can identify the most embarrassing scientific moments ever.
10 Completely False ?Facts? Everyon...

10 Completely False ?Facts? Everyone Knows

The blood in your veins is blue. Glass is a slow-moving liquid. If you touch a baby bird, its mother will abandon it. Not so fast ?- if you learned any of those "facts" in school, what you learned was wrong.
Flight Pictures

Flight Pictures

Flight pictures show photos from aviation history. Take a look at pictures of the most important aircraft in history.
How the Electoral College Works

How the Electoral College Works

The Electoral College is not an Ivy League school. Rather, it's a process for selecting the next U.S. president that actually carries more weight than the popular vote. Why is it there and should it be continued?
What is a Nor'easter?

What is a Nor'easter?

Nor'easters typically affect the east coast of the United States during the winter season. What exactly are Nor'easters, though, and how do they form. Find out the answer to this question in this article from HowStuffWorks.

Unexplained-mysteries

Nazi gold train could contain 'Ambe...

Nazi gold train could contain 'Amber Room'

The mysterious Nazi gold train in Poland may contain an ornate room stolen from St Petersburg in 1941. By now any doubts about the existence of the tr...
Scientists invent ice cream that do...

Scientists invent ice cream that doesn't melt

A team of scientists in Scotland has come up with a new type of ice cream that stays frozen for longer. Anyone who has enjoyed an ice cream cone at th...
New target selected for distant Plu...

New target selected for distant Pluto probe

NASA's New Horizons probe might have finished with Pluto but its mission is not over by a long shot. New Horizons entered the record books earlier thi...
Rare nautilus spotted off Papua New...

Rare nautilus spotted off Papua New Guinea

An extremely rare species of cephalopod has been spotted again for the first time in over three decades. Allonautilus scrobiculatus, an extremely rare...
'Ghost' appears in window at old of...

'Ghost' appears in window at old office block

An eerie face has been photographed peering out the window of a Birmingham scrap metal business. The image (below), which was taken outside the office...
One-year Mars isolation simulation ...

One-year Mars isolation simulation has begun

Six people will spend the next year living in a dome in Hawaii to simulate a manned mission to Mars. The first astronauts to go to Mars will be spendi...

Sciencenewsforkids.org

That?s no dino!

That?s no dino!

Not all ancient reptiles were dinosaurs. Some soared, many swam the seas and still others looked like dinos?but actually weren?t.
Questions for ?That?s no dino!?

Questions for ?That?s no dino!?

Questions for ?That?s no dino!?
A germ stopper for blood products

A germ stopper for blood products

A new system can disable almost all viruses or bacteria that are lurking in donated blood platelets and plasma.
MERS virus hits South Korea hard

MERS virus hits South Korea hard

MERS ? a killer viral disease ? emerged for the first time only three years ago. That was in the Middle East. Now it has spread to Asia.
Explainer: What is a virus?

Explainer: What is a virus?

Viruses cause many of the world?s common diseases. These germs reproduce by hijacking the cells of their host.
Gulf oil spill: Still poisoning dol...

Gulf oil spill: Still poisoning dolphins to crickets

Once the 2010 Deepwater Horizon spill ended, oil continued to harm animals in the Gulf of Mexico. Five years later, it still may not be over, biologists worry.

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