Discovery

20 Year Old to Launch First Ocean C...

20 Year Old to Launch First Ocean Cleaning System

The Ocean Cleanup plans to deploy the floating structure off of the coast of Japan during the second quarter of 2016. Continue reading ?
African Plant Acts Like a Diamond D...

African Plant Acts Like a Diamond Detector

If you're prospecting for diamonds in Liberia, keep an eye out for the Pamaya. Continue reading ?
When Earth Wows: Monster Hurricanes

When Earth Wows: Monster Hurricanes

As hurricane season kicks off June 1, we look back at some of the most destructive storms to make landfall in U.S. history.
Rain Brings Relief as India Heatwav...

Rain Brings Relief as India Heatwave Death Toll Tops 2,200

A brief spell of rain on Sunday brought slight relief in the Delhi region but the temperature again touched 109 Fahrenheit in the afternoon.
El Nino Can Raise Sea Levels Along ...

El Nino Can Raise Sea Levels Along U.S. Coast

El Nino can raise sea levels along the U.S. West Coast, on top of warming-caused sea level rise.
Not Like 'San Andreas,' But L.A. Fa...

Not Like 'San Andreas,' But L.A. Faces Real Tsunami Danger

There are some under-appreciated, San Andreas-like faults off Los Angeles that could unleash large quakes and tsunamis. But it's nothing like Hollywood's version.

Yahoo Science

CERN's Large Hadron Collider to res...

CERN's Large Hadron Collider to resume smashing particles in hunt for dark matter

A general view of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) experiment is seen during a media visit at the Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) in the French village of Saint-Genis-Pouilly near Geneva in SwitzerlandBy Tom Miles GENEVA (Reuters) - The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) will start smashing particles together at unprecedented speed on Wednesday, churning out data for the first time in more than two years that scientists hope might help crack the mystery of "dark matter". The LHC, a 27 km (17 mile) underground complex near Geneva, will smash protons at 13 tera-electron-volts (TeV), almost twice the energy achieved in an initial three-year run that began in 2010. This proved the existence of the elusive Higgs boson particle, a discovery that produced two Nobel prizes in 2013.

Study reveals famous California red...

Study reveals famous California redwood is 777 years young

A new study to determine the age of iconic old-growth redwoods in California's Muir Woods has revealed that one of the tallest and most famous trees in the forest is much younger than many assumed given its massive size, scientists said on Tuesday. Tree 76, so named because it towers 76 meters or 249 feet above the forest floor, is 777 years old, much younger than the oldest known redwood, according to a study by Humboldt State University, which has long been working with conservation group Save the Redwoods League on the impact of climate change on the trees. "Tree 76 is one of the larger trees that you can walk near so I think people have been guessing about its age for a long time," Save the Redwoods League Science Director Emily Burns said.
Chimps have mental skills to cook: ...

Chimps have mental skills to cook: study

By Sharon Begley NEW YORK (Reuters) - They're not likely to start barbecuing in the rainforest, but chimpanzees can understand the concept of cooking and are willing to postpone eating raw food, even carrying food some distance to cook it rather than eat immediately, scientists reported on Tuesday. Surprisingly, since chimps usually eat food immediately, they were often willing to walk across a room to cook.
PlanetiQ tests sensor for commercia...

PlanetiQ tests sensor for commercial weather satellites

By Irene Klotz CAPE CANAVERAL (Reuters) - PlanetiQ, a privately owned company, is beginning a key test intended to pave the way for the first commercial weather satellites. The Bethesda, Maryland-based company is among a handful of startups designing commercial weather satellite networks, similar to what companies like DigitalGlobe, Planet Labs and Google Inc?s Skybox Imaging are undertaking in the sister commercial satellite industry of remote sensing. ?I think weather is the next big market,? PlanetiQ's chief executive and president, Anne Hale Miglarese, said.
Mother fights brain cancer with ele...

Mother fights brain cancer with electric fields

By Ben Gruber ST. LOUIS MISSOURI - Against all odds, Elizabeth Marek is alive thanks to a tumor-killing device that attacks brain cancer cells with electric fields. Marek has glioblastoma, a deadly and aggressive form of brain cancer with no cure and a life expectancy of just over two years. Twenty-six weeks pregnant with her second child, 3 years after a small tumor was found in her brain, Marek began suffering from extreme headaches.
US Bird Flu Outbreak in Poultry: Wo...

US Bird Flu Outbreak in Poultry: Workers at Higher Risk, CDC Warn

The chance that a person will get bird flu in the United States remains very low, but people who come into close contact with infected birds may be at higher risk of infection, officials warned today, in light of the recent U.S. outbreaks of bird flu in poultry. Since December, more than 40 million birds in the United States have been infected or exposed to harmful bird flu viruses that typically cause severe illness or death in the animals. The outbreak has led authorities to kill millions of birds on poultry farms in the Midwest, in an effort to prevent the spread of the virus through the flocks on those farms.

Physorg.com

Massive chip consolidation wave is ...

Massive chip consolidation wave is changing semiconductor industry

A wave of mergers and acquisitions is reshaping Silicon Valley's semiconductor industry as companies join forces to shoulder the soaring technology costs required to stay competitive.
Will Texas Instruments sit out wave...

Will Texas Instruments sit out wave of mergers and acquisitions?

The latest round of mergers in the semiconductor industry has some observers wondering if Texas Instruments Inc. will jump into the ring.
Congress sends NSA phone-records bi...

Congress sends NSA phone-records bill to president

Congress approved sweeping changes Tuesday to surveillance laws enacted after the Sept. 11 attacks, eliminating the National Security Agency's disputed bulk phone-records collection program and replacing it with a more restrictive measure to keep the records in phone companies' hands.
Researchers discover deepest high-t...

Researchers discover deepest high-temperature hydrothermal vents in Pacific Ocean

In spring 2015, MBARI researchers discovered a large, previously unknown field of hydrothermal vents in the Gulf of California, about 150 kilometers (100 miles) east of La Paz, Mexico. Lying more than 3,800 meters (12,500 feet) below the surface, the Pescadero Basin vents are the deepest high-temperature hydrothermal vents ever observed in or around the Pacific Ocean. They are also the only vents in the Pacific known to emit superheated fluids rich in both carbonate minerals and hydrocarbons. The vents have been colonized by dense communities of tubeworms and other animals unlike any other known vent communities in the in the eastern Pacific.
Johns Hopkins study connects studen...

Johns Hopkins study connects student vision with literacy

In the month after Alexander Dominguez joined Maygon Thompson's third-grade class at Charles Carroll Barrister Elementary School, he breezed through worksheets and quickly rose to be among the most studious members.
SunEdison may sell rest of stake in...

SunEdison may sell rest of stake in SunEdison Semiconductor

Solar developer SunEdison plans to sell more of the stake it holds in SunEdison Semiconductor, according to a U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission filing Monday.

PBS

DNA-Testing Reef Diversity

DNA-Testing Reef Diversity

Marine biologist Laetitia Plaisance investigates species diversity in two coral reefs and receives some sobering news.
First Man on the Moon

First Man on the Moon

He risked his life for the nation and became a world icon, but who was Neil Armstrong?
When Shark Fetuses Attack

When Shark Fetuses Attack

Sand tiger shark fetuses eat their siblings in the womb.
Rise of the Hackers

Rise of the Hackers

A new global geek squad is harnessing cryptography to stay a step ahead of cybercriminals.
Can Cocaine Make Your Ears Rot?

Can Cocaine Make Your Ears Rot?

Cocaine is being mixed with a dangerous drug called levamisole.
Lethal Seas

Lethal Seas

A unique coral garden in Papua New Guinea shows what the future may hold as oceans acidify.

Scientific American

Treating Koala STDs May also Quash ...

Treating Koala STDs May also Quash Their Essential Gut Microbes

Koalas rely on specialized bacteria to digest eucalyptus, but antibiotics to stop sexually transmitted infections might be killing the microbes off -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
Beyond San Andreas: Hidden Sea Faul...

Beyond San Andreas: Hidden Sea Faults Threaten Giant California Quakes

While actor The Rock dodged boulders in "San Andreas" this weekend, a new study highlighted seafloor cracks that could hurl tsunamis at Los Angeles. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
Why Almost Everything Dean Ornish S...

Why Almost Everything Dean Ornish Says about Nutrition Is Wrong. UPDATED: With Dean Ornish's Response

A critique of the diet guru's views on high-protein diets, followed by a response from Ornish and a reply from the author -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
Flight Takes Off across the Pacific...

Flight Takes Off across the Pacific Powered Only by Sunshine

A solar-powered plane will fly for an estimated five days and nights—or ditch in the ocean -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
Why Carbon Is the Best Marker for t...

Why Carbon Is the Best Marker for the New Human Epoch

Black balls that litter the planet may prove the best marker for a new geologic epoch recognizing humanity's outsized impacts -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
Don't Overthink It, Less Is More Wh...

Don't Overthink It, Less Is More When It Comes to Creativity

New research reveals unexpected brain regions contribute to creativity -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

Newscientist

Guilty pleasures: Is there a safer ...

Guilty pleasures: Is there a safer way to soak up the sun?

Get the beneficial effects of the sun's rays without a damaging overdose thanks to clever tech and some dietary tweaks (full text available to subscribers)
Full reboot allows Large Hadron Col...

Full reboot allows Large Hadron Collider to hunt new particles

Experiments are about to restart at the Large Hadron Collider, and this time the search will focus on dark matter and supersymmetric particles
UNESCO edges closer to declaring Gr...

UNESCO edges closer to declaring Great Barrier Reef ?in danger'

As it considers putting the reef on its World Heritage in Danger list, UNESCO has given the Australian government 18 months to devise and fund a protection plan
Small atoll islands may grow, not s...

Small atoll islands may grow, not sink, as sea levels rise

Climate change may spare the inhabitants of some tiny islands as storms can help atolls to swell, although other islands remain at risk
Old Scientist: Earth's deep memory ...

Old Scientist: Earth's deep memory written in the rocks

From the June archives of New Scientist: before we knew the truth about plate tectonics, a big stone book and how rocks remember
Millennia of memories at risk in Au...

Millennia of memories at risk in Austria's ice cave

Ice-filled caves in Austria could tell us a lot about climatic conditions in heavily populated areas ? if we can study them before they melt

NY times.com Science

Irwin A. Rose, Nobel-Winning Bioche...

Irwin A. Rose, Nobel-Winning Biochemist, Dies at 88

Dr. Rose?s early interest in the problem of protein disposal helped lead to the development of a new class of cancer-fighting drugs.
Academics Seek a Big Splash

Academics Seek a Big Splash

The benefits of generating media attention may be skewing research studies and broadening their findings.
E.P.A. to Set New Limits on Airplan...

E.P.A. to Set New Limits on Airplane Emissions

The Environmental Protection Agency is expected to report as early as Friday that greenhouse gas emissions from airplanes endanger human health through global warming.
Economic Scene: Climate Deal Badly ...

Economic Scene: Climate Deal Badly Needs a Big Stick

Fruitless efforts to seriously curb greenhouse gas pollution suggest a new approach is warranted ? making it costly not to join an international consortium committed to fighting climate change.
Californians Are Encouraged by Shar...

Californians Are Encouraged by Sharp Drop in Water Use

Californians cut their water use in April by 13.5 percent over the same month two years ago, the first indication of how the state is reacting to mandatory water cutbacks.
ScienceTake: Chimps Would Cook if G...

ScienceTake: Chimps Would Cook if Given the Chance, Research Says

Scientists from Harvard and Yale found that chimpanzees would give up raw food on the possibility that it might emerge cooked later.

Science Daily

Tiny birds ?cry hawk? to give offsp...

Tiny birds ?cry hawk? to give offspring chance to escape predators

New research has found that the 6 gram brown thornbill mimics the hawk alarm calls of neighboring species to scare a nest predator by convincing it that a much bigger and scarier predator -- the brown goshawk -- is on its way.
Helping youth cope with anxiety, de...

Helping youth cope with anxiety, depression, and suicidal thoughts

A program is helping strengthen the mental health of public school students. The EMPATHY program, created and implemented in 2013, shows after just three months of use in schools, the program significantly decreased anxiety, depression and suicidal thoughts among the student population.
Deepest high-temperature hydrotherm...

Deepest high-temperature hydrothermal vents discovered in Pacific Ocean

Researchers have discovered a large, previously unknown field of hydrothermal vents in the Gulf of California, about 150 kilometers (100 miles) east of La Paz, Mexico. Lying more than 3,800 meters (12,500 feet) below the surface, the Pescadero Basin vents are the deepest high-temperature hydrothermal vents ever observed in or around the Pacific Ocean.
Social and sensory overstimulation ...

Social and sensory overstimulation drives autistic behaviors, animal study suggests

A new study shows that social and sensory overstimulation drives autistic behaviors. The study, conducted on rats exposed to a known risk factor in humans, supports the unconventional view of the autistic brain as hyper-functional, and offers new hope with therapeutic emphasis on paced and non-surprising environments tailored to the individual's sensitivity.
Alice instrument's ultraviolet clos...

Alice instrument's ultraviolet close-up provides a surprising discovery about comet's atmosphere

A close-up of Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko by NASA's ultraviolet instrument surprised scientists by revealing that electrons close to the comet's surface -- not photons from the sun as had been believed -- cause the rapid breakup of water and carbon dioxide molecules spewing from the surface.
How to weigh the Milky Way

How to weigh the Milky Way

Scientists used streams produced by dissolving globular clusters to measure the weight of our galaxy and determine the location of the sun within the Milky Way.

Eureka Alert

New report: Texas Hispanics, women ...

New report: Texas Hispanics, women show largest reductions in rates of uninsured

(Rice University) Hispanics and women in Texas showed the largest percentage of reductions in rates of uninsured since enrollment began in the Affordable Care Act's Health Insurance Marketplace, according to a new report released today by the Episcopal Health Foundation and Rice University's Baker Institute for Public Policy.
Why the 'cool factor' won't lure co...

Why the 'cool factor' won't lure college grads to your city

(Ohio State University) A new nationwide study reveals that the kind of cities that attract college graduates has changed since the 1990s.
Hidden costs: Emotion responses to ...

Hidden costs: Emotion responses to command and control

(Cornell Food & Brand Lab) Creating a conflict with the population that a policy targets can backfire. The most successful public policies are those that are framed positively and support choice.
Dartmouth announces landmark $10M g...

Dartmouth announces landmark $10M gifts towards academic clusters on healthcare and globalization

(Dartmouth College) Dartmouth has announced two landmark gifts that will engage faculty and students in tackling some of the world's greatest challenges and ultimately aim to improve the lives of people across the globe.
It takes a village: Why do consumer...

It takes a village: Why do consumers participate in wind energy programs?

(American Marketing Association) Why do people participate in programs that benefit the environment, even when there seems to be no direct personal benefit in taking part? More specifically, why would consumers pay good money for wind energy when it is not at all clear that they are benefiting from that energy? The answer may lie in a psychological sense of community with other wind-energy customers, according to a new study in the Journal of Public Policy & Marketing.
Don't overthink it: Trusting first ...

Don't overthink it: Trusting first impressions increases sales

(American Marketing Association) They say you never get a second chance to make a first impression. When it comes to selling, that might be a good thing, suggests a new study in the Journal of Marketing.

Forteantimes

Thur 20 Nov - Daily round-up of the...

Thur 20 Nov - Daily round-up of the world's weird news

Young boy claimed to be reincarnated Marine, four armed baby named God Boy by parents, Bumfight punk body part theft
Mon 17 Nov - Daily round-up of the ...

Mon 17 Nov - Daily round-up of the world's weird news

Philly Jesus goes ice skating, gets arrested, plus: human flesh pastry makers, Swastika bauble outrage and a pair of resurrections
Mon 10 Nov - Daily round-up of the ...

Mon 10 Nov - Daily round-up of the world's weird news

Quadruple amputee is armed and on the run; Man buys home, finds corpse inside; dowsers discover mass grave in Tunbridge Wells
Wed 29 Oct - Daily round-up of the ...

Wed 29 Oct - Daily round-up of the world's weird news

London museum planned to shoot and steal Nessie, Iceland offers Minge Pies for Christmas, plus a ghost in the bathtub
Mon 27 Oct - Daily round-up of the ...

Mon 27 Oct - Daily round-up of the world's weird news

Literary argument ends in death, tiger sex spoof video nightmare, man calls suicide hotline and is shot dead by SWAT team
Thur 23 Oct - Daily round-up of the...

Thur 23 Oct - Daily round-up of the world's weird news

Sex toy clown attack, Hitler coffee creamer PR disaster, man fights off bear with old computer, return of the Swedish mystery subs

Howstuffworks

The Most Embarrassing Moments in th...

The Most Embarrassing Moments in the History of Science

What? Scientists get things wrong? We know. It?s shocking to hear, but science isn?t always an exact science. Mistakes do happen -- and they often lead to great scientific discoveries. So, grab your safety glasses and see if you can identify the most embarrassing scientific moments ever.
10 Completely False ?Facts? Everyon...

10 Completely False ?Facts? Everyone Knows

The blood in your veins is blue. Glass is a slow-moving liquid. If you touch a baby bird, its mother will abandon it. Not so fast ?- if you learned any of those "facts" in school, what you learned was wrong.
Flight Pictures

Flight Pictures

Flight pictures show photos from aviation history. Take a look at pictures of the most important aircraft in history.
How the Electoral College Works

How the Electoral College Works

The Electoral College is not an Ivy League school. Rather, it's a process for selecting the next U.S. president that actually carries more weight than the popular vote. Why is it there and should it be continued?
What is a Nor'easter?

What is a Nor'easter?

Nor'easters typically affect the east coast of the United States during the winter season. What exactly are Nor'easters, though, and how do they form. Find out the answer to this question in this article from HowStuffWorks.

Unexplained-mysteries

Were dinosaurs warm or cold-blooded...

Were dinosaurs warm or cold-blooded ?

A new study has suggested that the prehistoric reptiles were more likely to be warm-blooded like mammals. The question over whether the dinosaurs were...
Wild 'virgin-born' sawfish are a wo...

Wild 'virgin-born' sawfish are a world first

Smalltooth sawfish in Florida appear to have developed a novel new way of escaping their own extinction. Ecologists made the discovery while studying ...
NASA prepares for second 'flying sa...

NASA prepares for second 'flying saucer' test

The space agency will be testing out its futuristic Mars landing system over Hawaii this week. While NASA's sky crane mechanism was successful in lowe...
Children recall past lives as Buddh...

Children recall past lives as Buddhist monks

Dr. Erlendur Haraldsson has been investigating cases in which children have recalled past life memories. While the concept of past lives and the idea ...
Microbes can survive in space for y...

Microbes can survive in space for years

New research has emphasized the remarkable persistence of life even in the cold vacuum of space. The idea that life can be transferred around the cosm...
Hooded figure spooks drivers in Aus...

Hooded figure spooks drivers in Australia

Dashcam footage shows a creepy figure walk out on to the road and lunge at a car as it passes by. The driver had been traveling along Lake Road near K...

Sciencenewsforkids.org

Fossil find adds a relative to our ...

Fossil find adds a relative to our family tree

Lucy is the best known of our early ancestors. Now, a new fossil from Ethiopia suggests a second pre-human species lived alongside her kind.
Too hot? Some peaks offer climate m...

Too hot? Some peaks offer climate migrants lots of land

As mountain climates warm, species may actually gain ground as they migrate up to cooler sites, a new study finds.
Vaping may harm the lungs

Vaping may harm the lungs

E-cigarettes are the most widely used tobacco product among U.S. teens. But emerging data suggest vaping can harm the lungs.
Questions for ?Vaping may harm the ...

Questions for ?Vaping may harm the lungs?

Questions for ?Vaping may harm a teen?s lungs?
Computing: Swapping a glove for the...

Computing: Swapping a glove for the keyboard

Sensor-studded gloves, designed by a Texas teen, might someday serve as a virtual keyboard or musical instrument ? or even help interpret sign language.
This door handle kills germs

This door handle kills germs

A high-tech door handle may cut down on disease transmission, say its teen developers. The system is powered by simply opening and closing the door.

PopSci

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Science News.org

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