Discovery

Could Clay Help Attack Superbugs?

Could Clay Help Attack Superbugs?

The ancient remedy could provide a new weapon against microbes Continue reading ?
DNews: The Dreaded Turbulence: What...

DNews: The Dreaded Turbulence: What Makes Flights Bumpy

Most of us probably breathe a sigh of relief when the captain promises "a smooth ride" to wherever we're flying. But, as DNews explains, turbulence is really no big deal.
Why Antarctic Sea Ice Isn't Shrinki...

Why Antarctic Sea Ice Isn't Shrinking

Winds, currents and seafloor features may be responsible for keeping Antarctica's sea ice intact.
Why Is India's Heat Wave Off the Ch...

Why Is India's Heat Wave Off the Chart?

An oppressive heat wave in India led to a record temperature of 123.8 degrees Fahrenheit -- the highest ever in Asia.
Live on a Farm by the Sea for Just ...

Live on a Farm by the Sea for Just $1.50

A four-bedroom bungalow and 416 sheep are all covered by the annual rent. Scenic views available at no additional cost. Continue reading ?
US: 1 in 8 Swimming Pools Closed fo...

US: 1 in 8 Swimming Pools Closed for Health Violations

One in eight swimming pools in five populous states are closed upon inspection due to dirty and potentially dangerous water, the CDC reported this week. Continue reading ?

Yahoo Science

How to Reopen Schools: What Science...

How to Reopen Schools: What Science and Other Countries Teach Us

How to Reopen Schools: What Science and Other Countries Teach UsAs school districts across the United States consider whether and how to restart in-person classes, their challenge is complicated by a pair of fundamental uncertainties: No nation has tried to send children back to school with the virus raging at levels like America's, and the scientific research about transmission in classrooms is limited.The World Health Organization has now concluded that the virus is airborne in crowded, indoor spaces with poor ventilation, a description that fits many American schools. But there is enormous pressure to bring students back -- from parents, from pediatricians and child development specialists, and from President Donald Trump."I'm just going to say it: It feels like we're playing Russian roulette with our kids and our staff," said Robin Cogan, a nurse at the Yorkship School in Camden, New Jersey, who serves on the state's committee on reopening schools.Data from around the world clearly shows that children are far less likely to become seriously ill from the coronavirus than adults. But there are big unanswered questions, including how often children become infected and what role they play in transmitting the virus. Some research suggests younger children are less likely to infect other people than teenagers are, which would make opening elementary schools less risky than high schools, but the evidence is not conclusive.The experience abroad has shown that measures such as physical distancing and wearing masks in schools can make a difference. Another important variable is how widespread the virus is in the community overall, because that will affect how many people potentially bring it into a school.For most districts, the solution won't be an all-or-nothing approach. Many systems, including the nation's largest, New York City, are devising hybrids that involve spending some days in classrooms and other days online."You have to do a lot more than just waving your hands and say make it so," said Dr. Joshua Sharfstein, a professor of the practice at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. "First you have to control the community spread and then you have to open schools thoughtfully."The Transmission PuzzleThough children are at much lower risk of getting seriously ill from the coronavirus than adults, the risk is not zero. A small number of children have died and others needed intensive care because they suffered respiratory failure or an inflammatory syndrome that caused heart or circulatory problems.The larger concern with reopening schools is the potential for children to become infected, many with no symptoms, and then spread the virus to others, including family members, teachers and other school employees. Most evidence to date suggests that even if children under age 12 are infected at the same rates as the adults around them, they are less likely to spread it. The American Academy of Pediatrics has cited some of this data to recommend that schools reopen with proper safety precautions.But the bulk of the evidence was collected in countries that were already in lockdown or had begun to implement other preventive measures. And few countries have systematically tested children for the virus or for antibodies that would indicate whether they had been exposed to the virus.Infectious disease specialists have been modeling schools' impact on community spread beginning as far back as February.In March, most modelers agreed that closing schools would slow the progression of infections. But wider measures, like social distancing, proved to have a far greater containing effect, overshadowing the results of school closings, according to recent analyses.The risk of reopening "will depend on how well schools contain transmission, with masks, for instance, or limiting occupancy," said Lauren Ancel Meyers, a professor of biology and statistics at the University of Texas, Austin, who has been consulting with the city and school districts. "The background community transmission rate in August will also be a factor."In Austin, for example, which like cities in Florida and Arizona has seen a recent acceleration in new cases, the estimated infection rate now is about seven per 1,000 residents. That means a school with 500 students would have about four carrying the coronavirus. "The school might be able to contain those, depending on the measures it takes," Meyers said.If not, schools could help incubate outbreaks, given that they're enclosed facilities where students, especially younger ones, are likely to have great difficulty social distancing, never mind wearing masks. Even if it turns out that children do not spread the virus efficiently, all it would take is one or two to seed new chains.Evidence From AbroadSo far, countries that reopened schools after reducing infection levels -- and imposed requirements like physical distancing and limits on class sizes -- have not seen a surge in coronavirus cases.Norway and Denmark are good examples. Both reopened their schools in April, a month or so after they were closed, but they initially opened them only for younger children, keeping high schools shut until later. They strengthened sanitizing procedures, and have kept class size limited, children in small groups at recess and space between desks. Neither country has seen a significant increase in cases.There have not yet been rigorous scientific studies on the potential for school-based spread, but a smattering of case reports, most of them not yet peer-reviewed, bolster the notion that it is not inevitably a high risk.One snapshot comes from a study in Ireland of six infected people (two high school students, an elementary student and three adults) who spent time in schools before they were closed in March. The researchers analyzed 1,155 contacts of the six patients to see if any had been found to have confirmed coronavirus infection. The contacts included participants in school activities that could be fertile ground for transmission, like music lessons on woodwind instruments, choir practice and sports. None of the students appeared to have infected any other people, the authors reported, adding that the only documented transmission of the virus was to two adults who were in contact with one of the infected adults outside of school.But there have been school-based outbreaks in countries with higher community infection levels and countries that apparently eased safety guidelines too soon. In Israel, the virus infected more than 200 students and staff after schools reopened in early May and lifted limits on class size a few weeks later, according to a report by University of Washington researchers.Case studies in some countries suggest differences in virus transmission in younger children compared with older children.In one community in northern France, Crepy-en-Valois, two high school teachers became ill with COVID-19 in early February, before schools closed. Scientists from the Institut Pasteur later tested the school's students and staff for coronavirus antibodies. They found antibodies in 38% of the students, 43% of the teachers, and 59% of other school staff, said Dr. Arnaud Fontanet, an epidemiologist at the institute who led the study and is a member of a committee advising the French government."Clearly you know that the virus circulated in the high school," Fontanet said.Later, the team tested students and staff from six elementary schools in the community. The closure of schools in mid-February provided an opportunity to see if younger children had become infected when schools were in session, the point when the virus struck high school students.Researchers found antibodies in only 9% of elementary students, 7% of teachers and 4% of other staff. They identified three students in three different elementary schools who had attended classes with acute coronavirus symptoms before the schools closed. None appeared to have infected other children, teachers or staff, Fontanet said. Two of those symptomatic students had siblings in the high school and the third had a sister who worked in the high school, he said.The research also indicated that when an elementary school student tested positive for coronavirus antibodies, there was a very high probability that the student's parents had also been infected, Fontanet said. The probability was not nearly as high for parents of high school students. "When I look at the timing, we think it started in the high school, moved into the families and then to the young students," he said.Fontanet said that the findings suggest that older children may be able to transmit the virus more easily than younger children.That pattern may also be reflected by the experience in Israel, where one of the largest school outbreaks, involving about 175 students and staff, occurred in Gymnasia Rehavia, a middle and high school in Jerusalem.There are different theories about why older children would be more likely to transmit the virus than younger children. Some scientists say that younger children are less likely to have COVID-19 symptoms like coughs and less likely to have strong speaking voices, both of which can transmit the virus in droplets. Other researchers are examining whether proteins that enable the virus to enter lung cells and replicate are less abundant in children, limiting the severity of their infection and potentially their ability to transmit the virus.What Schools Can DoTesting for infections in schools is essential, public health experts said. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends testing of students or teachers based only on symptoms or a history of exposure. But that will not catch everyone who is infected."We know that asymptomatic or pre-symptomatic spread is real, and we know that kids are less likely to show symptoms if they're infected than adults," said Dr. Megan Ranney, an emergency medicine doctor and expert in adolescent health at Brown University. Schools should randomly test students and teachers, she said, but that may be impossible given the lack of funding and limited testing even in hospitals.Countries that have reopened schools have implemented a range of safety guidelines.Some countries initially brought back only a portion of their students -- younger children in Denmark, Norway, Belgium, Switzerland and Greece; older children in Germany, according to the report by University of Washington researchers. Belgium brought back students in shifts on alternate days.Several countries limited class size, often allowing a maximum of 10 to 15 students in a classroom. Many place desks several feet apart. Several countries group children in pods or cohorts with social interaction largely restricted to those groups, especially at recess and lunchtime.Mask-wearing policies vary. In Asia, where the practice of wearing masks during flu season is common, many countries are requiring masks in school. Elsewhere, some countries required masks for only some students or staff, such as teachers in Belgium and high school students in France, according to the University of Washington report.In Germany, students who test negative for the virus do not have to wear masks, according to the report, which said that since opening schools, Germany has seen increased transmission of the virus among students, but not school staff.The CDC has outlined steps schools can take to minimize the risks for students, including maintaining a distance of 6 feet, washing hands and wearing masks."The guidelines are already exceptionally weak," said Carl Bergstrom, an infectious diseases expert at the University of Washington in Seattle. He and others said they feared that the recommendations would get watered down even more in response to political pressure.The CDC has been working on new recommendations for reopening schools for several weeks, in consultation with organizations like the National Association of School Nurses, according to a CDC spokesperson. The five planned documents include guidance on symptom screening and face masks, and a checklist for parents or guardians trying to decide whether to send their children to school. But they do not include any information on improving ventilation or curtailing airborne spread of the virus.Schools will need to ensure that they circulate fresh air, whether by filtering the air, pumping it in from the outside, or simply by opening windows, said Saskia Popescu, a hospital epidemiologist at The University of Arizona. School nurses like Cogan will also need protective equipment like gloves, gowns and N95 masks.There are differences in how other countries are responding when coronavirus cases are identified in schools, with some countries, like Israel, closing entire schools for a single case and others taking the more targeted approach of sending students and teachers in an affected classroom into home quarantine for two weeks.Dr. Kathryn Edwards, an infectious disease specialist and professor of pediatrics at Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, is advising Nashville, Tennessee, schools on reopening approaches. She said the district is still evaluating how far apart desks should be. "Some people say you only need 3 feet and others say you need 6 feet, and others wonder with the aerosol issue, do we need more distance?"Edwards said she was disappointed by Nashville's decision, announced Thursday, to conduct classes online for the first month of school, at least until Labor Day.Keeping schools closed for a prolonged stretch has worrisome implications for social and academic development, child development experts say. It also became evident this spring that denying children a real school day deepened racial and economic inequalities."There is really damage to kids if they don't go to school," Edwards said. "I think we have got to think of the kids and getting them back to school safely."This article originally appeared in The New York Times.(C) 2020 The New York Times Company


NASA?s InSight lander is still stuc...

NASA?s InSight lander is still stuck in the Martian soil

NASA?s InSight lander is still stuck in the Martian soilIt needs to dig 3 meters deep, which is proving a challenge


The Emirates will make history with...

The Emirates will make history with its mission to Mars launching on Tuesday

The Emirates will make history with its mission to Mars launching on TuesdayHere's how to watch the launch live


OneWeb sale to UK-Bharti group gets...

OneWeb sale to UK-Bharti group gets court approval

OneWeb sale to UK-Bharti group gets court approvalA New York court hearing accepts the plan to pull the OneWeb satellite company out of bankruptcy.


Nasa Mars rover Perseverance is att...

Nasa Mars rover Perseverance is attached to rocket

Nasa Mars rover Perseverance is attached to rocketThe US space agency's next rover is placed atop of the rocket that will send it to the Red Planet.


England's future water supplies...

England's future water supplies at 'serious risk'

England's future water supplies at 'serious risk'MPs warn some regions will run out of water within the next 20 years unless "urgent action" is taken.


Physorg.com

SpaceX delays launch of mini-satell...

SpaceX delays launch of mini-satellites

SpaceX on Saturday delayed the launch of a rocket due to take 57 mini-satellites into space as part of plan to build an orbiting, global broadband internet system.
Nearly 300 wildfires in Siberia ami...

Nearly 300 wildfires in Siberia amid record warm weather

Russia's forest service said there were nearly 300 wildfires blazing across the vast country's northern wilderness on Saturday, as it attempted to contain them with methods including explosives and cloud seeding.
The quest to find signs of ancient ...

The quest to find signs of ancient life on Mars

Mars may now be considered a barren, icy desert but did Earth's nearest neighbour once harbour life?
Tiger, pangolin farming in Myanmar ...

Tiger, pangolin farming in Myanmar risks 'boosting demand'

Conservationists have warned a sudden change in Myanmar's law allowing the commercial farming of tigers, pangolins and other endangered species risks further fuelling demand in China for rare wildlife products.
Theft law needs reform to reduce th...

Theft law needs reform to reduce the risk of judgements which lack 'common sense'

Theft law needs reform so the crime is based on consent not dishonesty?reducing the risk of judgements which lack "common sense"?a new study warns.
Liquid crystals create easy-to-read...

Liquid crystals create easy-to-read, color-changing sensors

Chameleons are famous for their color-changing abilities. Depending on their body temperature or mood, their nervous system directs skin tissue that contains nanocrystals to expand or contract, changing how the nanocrystals reflect light and turning the reptile's skin a rainbow of colors.

PBS

Interview: A disease modeler talks ...

Interview: A disease modeler talks Covid-19, contact tracing, and quarantine

Rae Wannier is trying to understand the effects of shelter-in-place orders?while sheltering in place.
Interview: Tropical paleontology an...

Interview: Tropical paleontology and being #BlackInNature

Paleobiologist Melissa Kemp says humans have been introducing species to the Caribbean since long before Columbus arrived?and she?s helping piece that history together.
The unlikely journey of an eagle fe...

The unlikely journey of an eagle feather

When an eagle dies in America, it may end up at one of our eagle repositories?unique institutions working to protect both birds of prey and Native American traditions.
Covid-19 patients sharing ventilato...

Covid-19 patients sharing ventilators is possible?but not ideal

The science of coventilation for coronavirus cases illustrates a complicated dilemma.
Bring Climate Science to the Digita...

Bring Climate Science to the Digital Classroom with the Polar Lab

Online, interactive resources for teaching climate science and climate change to middle and high school students
Five Technology Documentaries Strea...

Five Technology Documentaries Streaming Right Now

Five episodes exploring the revolution and ethics of technology.

Scientific American

How Coronavirus Spreads through the...

How Coronavirus Spreads through the Air: What We Know So Far

The virus that causes COVID-19 can persist in aerosol form, some studies suggest. But the potential for transmission depends on many factors, including infectiousness, dose and ventilation

-- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
Americans Increase LSD Use--and a B...

Americans Increase LSD Use--and a Bleak Outlook for the World May Be to Blame

Millennials and older adults lead the surge while Gen Z stays on the sidelines

-- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
Comet NEOWISE Could Be Spectacular:...

Comet NEOWISE Could Be Spectacular: Here's How to See It

Already visible to the naked eye, the object may soon brighten to create the greatest celestial light show in decades—or it could simply fade away

-- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
Ships Hit Smaller Sea Animals More ...

Ships Hit Smaller Sea Animals More Often than Researchers Thought

New research sheds light on the range of creatures killed and injured by collisions

-- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
Vaccinations Have Sharply Declined ...

Vaccinations Have Sharply Declined Nationwide during the COVID-19 Pandemic

Rates of childhood immunization have fallen across the U.S., raising the risk of vaccine-preventable disease outbreaks​

-- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
Summer on Mars: NASA's Perseverance...

Summer on Mars: NASA's Perseverance Rover Is One of Three Missions Ready to Launch

A new generation of orbiters, landers and rovers will study the Red Planet as never before, setting the stage for returning pristine samples to Earth

-- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

Newscientist

Covid-19 news: UK has opted out of ...

Covid-19 news: UK has opted out of EU coronavirus vaccine programme

The latest coronavirus news updated every day including coronavirus cases, the latest news, features and interviews from New Scientist and essential information about the covid-19 pandemic
Sperm swim up to 70 per cent faster...

Sperm swim up to 70 per cent faster when they have a lazy tail

Some sperm don't use the final few micrometres of their tail to move, but simulations show they may actually swim faster than others that do, which could help pave the way for improved fertility tests
The moon may have stopped the early...

The moon may have stopped the early Earth from being a frozen snowball

Astronomers have long been puzzled by the faint young sun paradox, which says the sun would not have been bright enough in the past to keep Earth warm. Now it seems the moon may have helped
Alien civilisations could move thei...

Alien civilisations could move their star to avoid a cosmic disaster

A researcher has come up with an idea for a huge machine that advanced civilisations could use to move their star system around the galaxy ? and we might be able to spot one in action
European bison to be introduced in ...

European bison to be introduced in the UK for first time outside zoos

In early 2022, four European bison are to be released in a controlled area of a nature reserve outside Canterbury ? a move conservationists hope will regenerate ecosystems
Noise-cancelling windows halve traf...

Noise-cancelling windows halve traffic sounds even when they're open

A grid of speakers fixed to a window can cut the noisiness of urban traffic in half, reducing the sound coming through an open window by up to 10 decibels

NY times.com Science

Scientists Say You Can Cancel the N...

Scientists Say You Can Cancel the Noise but Keep Your Window Open

Researchers in Singapore developed a system that?s sort of like noise-canceling headphones for your whole apartment.
Beyond the Milky Way, a Galactic Wa...

Beyond the Milky Way, a Galactic Wall

Astronomers have discovered a vast assemblage of galaxies hidden behind our own, in the ?zone of avoidance.?
This Ancient Sea Creature Builds It...

This Ancient Sea Creature Builds Its Body With a Whisper, Not a Scream

Unlike vertebrate embryo cells, which signal to each other over long distances, sea squirt embryo cells talk only to those they?re closest to.
How a Saber-Tooth Marsupial Blinded...

How a Saber-Tooth Marsupial Blinded Us With Its Bite

The extinct South American animal made us believe it was as fierce as a saber-tooth cat, but a new study suggests it was a mere scavenger.
Some Polynesians Carry Native Ameri...

Some Polynesians Carry Native American DNA, Study Finds

A new genetic study suggests that Polynesians made an epic voyage to South America 800 years ago.
Scrutinizing SpaceX, NASA Overlooke...

Scrutinizing SpaceX, NASA Overlooked Some Boeing Software Problems

The agency identified the causes of mishaps in orbit during an uncrewed test flight of its Starliner spacecraft in December.

Science Daily

Scientists propose plan to determin...

Scientists propose plan to determine if Planet Nine is a primordial black hole

Scientists have developed a new method to find black holes in the outer solar system, and along with it, determine once-and-for-all the true nature of the hypothesized Planet Nine.
Study links abnormally high blood s...

Study links abnormally high blood sugar with higher risk of death in COVID-19 patients not previously diagnosed with diabetes

New research from Wuhan, China shows that, in patients with COVID-19 but without a previous diagnosis of diabetes, abnormally high blood sugar is associated with more than double the risk of death and also an increased risk of severe complications.
Couldn't socially distance? Blame y...

Couldn't socially distance? Blame your working memory

A new study highlights the critical role that working memory capacity plays in social distancing compliance during the early stages of the COVID-19 pandemic.
Physicians give first comprehensive...

Physicians give first comprehensive review of COVID-19's effects outside the lung

Based on their experience treating COVID-19, physicians have assembled critical information about the coronavirus's effects on organs outside the lungs.
Like humans, beluga whales form soc...

Like humans, beluga whales form social networks beyond family ties

A groundbreaking study is the first to analyze the relationship between group behaviors, group type, group dynamics, and kinship of beluga whales in 10 locations across the Arctic. Results show that not only do beluga whales regularly interact with close kin, including close maternal kin, they also frequently associate with more distantly related and unrelated individuals. Findings will improve the understanding of why some species are social, how individuals learn from group members and how animal cultures emerge.
Extraordinary regeneration of neuro...

Extraordinary regeneration of neurons in zebrafish

Biologists have discovered a uniquely rapid form of regeneration in injured neurons and their function in the central nervous system of zebrafish. They studies the Mauthner cells, which are solely responsible for the escape behavior of the fish, and previously regarded as incapable of regeneration. However, their ability to regenerate crucially depends on the location of the injury.

Eureka Alert

Couldn't socially distance? Blame y...

Couldn't socially distance? Blame your working memory

(University of California - Riverside) Whether you decided to engage in social distancing in the early stages of COVID-19 depended on how much information your working memory could hold. Researchers found individuals with higher working memory capacity have an increased awareness of benefits over costs of social distancing and show more compliance with recommended social distancing guidelines during the early stage of the COVID-19 outbreak. The UC Riverside-led study offers potential strategies to mitigate social-distancing noncompliance in a public-health crisis.
UC Riverside postdoc receives NIH P...

UC Riverside postdoc receives NIH Pathway to Independence grant

(University of California - Riverside) Rebekah Charney, a postdoctoral researcher in the UC Riverside School of Medicine, has received a five-year "Pathway to Independence" grant from the National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research of the National Institutes of Health.
USDA grant to support Cornell indoo...

USDA grant to support Cornell indoor ag training programs

(Cornell University) Thanks to a grant from the USDA, horticulture experts at Cornell University will help design new training programs for workers in controlled environment agriculture.
New solutions in math teaching and ...

New solutions in math teaching and learning: WVU project bringing $3 million investment to WV

(West Virginia University) With the aid of a six-year, $3 million grant from the National Science Foundation to the West Virginia University College of Education and Human Services, educators and researchers will work together to improve math teaching and learning through developing teacher leaders in secondary schools (grades six through 12) across West Virginia.
Pandemic inspires framework for enh...

Pandemic inspires framework for enhanced care in nursing homes

(University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing) As of May 2020, nursing home residents account for a staggering one-third of the more than 80,000 deaths due to COVID-19 in the U.S. This pandemic has resulted in unprecedented threats--like reduced access to resources needed to contain and eliminate the spread of the virus--to achieving and sustaining care quality even in the best nursing homes. Active engagement of nursing home leaders in developing solutions responsive to the unprecedented threats to quality standards of care delivery is required.
New biomarker for dementia diagnosi...

New biomarker for dementia diagnosis

(Flinders University) Medical researchers in the UK and Australia have identified a new marker which could support the search for novel preventative and therapeutic treatments for dementia. In an innovative new study, coordinated by Flinders University and University of Aberdeen, the researchers investigated the role of asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA), a blood marker associated with atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease in epidemiological studies, on temporal changes in cognition in an established cohort of human ageing (the 1936 Aberdeen Birth Cohort).

Forteantimes

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Howstuffworks

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Unexplained-mysteries

'Alien-like' life form discovered o...

'Alien-like' life form discovered on sea floor

Scientists have photographed a very peculiar life form in a region referred to as the 'Forest of the Weird'. Resembling an alien-like head attached to...
AATIP head: 'Pentagon has more evid...

AATIP head: 'Pentagon has more evidence'

The former head of the US government's secretive UFO research program has recently spoken out. Back in April, the US government officially declassifie...
'Vampire-slaying kit' goes up for a...

'Vampire-slaying kit' goes up for auction

A Gothic-looking box full of vampire-slaying paraphernalia is expected to fetch a hefty sum at auction. The fascinating kit, which is housed within an...
NASA's next Mars rover is attached ...

NASA's next Mars rover is attached to rocket

The Perseverance Mars rover has been attached to an Atlas V rocket in preparation for its epic journey. A follow-up to the space agency's long-lived C...
Bizarre 'xenophyophores' found in t...

Bizarre 'xenophyophores' found in the abyss

Scientists have discovered a number of exotic new life forms in the deepest depths of the Pacific Ocean. It is said that we know more about the surfac...
'10ft lake monster' caught on camer...

'10ft lake monster' caught on camera in China

Footage showing an unidentified creature lurking in the water of a Chinese lake has appeared on social media. The 25-second clip, which was posted up ...

Sciencenewsforkids.org

There are no news from this channel.

PopSci

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Science News.org

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