Discovery

Earth Shots: Must-See Planet Pics (...

Earth Shots: Must-See Planet Pics (Oct. 25)

Autumn blossoms in the U.K., toxic sulfur boils near Sicily and high above the U.S. Southwest, an an aurora is captured from space.
Tiny, Carbon-Scrubbing Champ Under ...

Tiny, Carbon-Scrubbing Champ Under Attack

Phytoplankton remove and store half the world's carbon, but they're under attack from rising ocean temperatures and viruses. Continue reading ?
What Will Winter Hold for Drought-P...

What Will Winter Hold for Drought-Plagued California?

El Nino probably won't bring California drought-busting winter rains, but the news may not be all bad.
6 Pound Gold 'Butte Nugget' Goes on...

6 Pound Gold 'Butte Nugget' Goes on Auction Block

A 6 pound gold nugget found in California carries a $350,000 to $450,000 price tag.
Monster Mushrooms Could Hold Key to...

Monster Mushrooms Could Hold Key to New Meds

The massive Agarikon mushroom shows promise for treating diseases such as tuberculosis, cowpox, bird and swine flu.
What?s the Deal With Europe?s Clima...

What?s the Deal With Europe?s Climate Talks?

European leaders are set to make important decisions this week about the continent's energy future.

Yahoo Science

The beast with the behemoth arms: A...

The beast with the behemoth arms: A dinosaur mystery is solved

Reconstruction of Deinocheirus mirificus the largest known member of a group of bird-like dinosaursBy Will Dunham WASHINGTON (Reuters) - In July 1965, two gigantic fossilized dinosaur arms replete with menacing claws were unearthed in the remote southern Gobi desert of Mongolia. Measuring 8 feet (2.4 meters), they were the longest arms of any known bipedal creature in Earth's history. But nearly everything else was missing, leaving experts baffled about the nature of this beast with the behemoth arms. Half a century later, the mystery has been solved. ...

Cosmonauts breeze through spacewalk...

Cosmonauts breeze through spacewalk outside space station

NASA photo of Solar array panels on the Russian segment of the International Space Station and a blue and white part of EarthBy Irene Klotz (Reuters) - Two Russian cosmonauts wrapped up a speedy, 3 -1/2-hour spacewalk outside the International Space Station on Wednesday to replace science experiments and jettison two unneeded antennas. Station commander Maxim Suraev and flight engineer Alexander Samokutyaev quickly completed the first task on their to-do list, removing and jettisoning a defunct science experiment known as Radiometriya. The device, which was installed in 2011, was used to track seismic activity on earth, NASA mission commentator Rob Navias said during a live broadcast of the spacewalk on NASA TV. ...

Comet makes rare close pass by Mars...

Comet makes rare close pass by Mars as spacecraft watch

Comet C/2013 A1, also known as Siding Spring, is seen as captured by Wide Field Camera 3 on NASA's Hubble Space TelescopeBy Irene Klotz NEW YORK (Reuters) - A comet from the outer reaches of the solar system on Sunday made a rare, close pass by Mars where a fleet of robotic science probes were poised for studies. Comet Siding Spring passed just 87,000 miles (140,000 km) from Mars, less than half the distance between Earth and the moon and 10 times closer than any known comet has passed by Earth, NASA said. ...

Greek archaeologists unearth head o...

Greek archaeologists unearth head of sphinx in Macedonian tomb

ATHENS (Reuters) - Archaeologists unearthed the missing head of one of the two sphinxes found guarding the entrance of an ancient tomb in Greece's northeast, as the diggers made their way into the monument's inner chambers, the culture ministry said on Tuesday. The tomb on the Amphipolis site, about 100 km (65 miles) from Greece's second-biggest city Thessaloniki, has been hailed by archaeologists as a major discovery from the era of Alexander the Great. They say it appears to be the largest ancient tomb to have been discovered in Greece. ...
23andMe, MyHeritage partner to comb...

23andMe, MyHeritage partner to combine DNA and family trees

TEL AVIV (Reuters) - Personal genetics company 23andMe and Israel's MyHeritage said on Tuesday they would collaborate to enable people to discover their heritage based on genetic ancestry and documented family history. California-based 23andMe, which is backed by Google, is a pioneer in the sale of home genetic tests and has more than 750,000 clients. It sells a $99 DNA test, from which it provides its customers ancestry-related genetic reports. MyHeritage helps families find their history with family tree tools and a library of more than 5.5 billion historical records. ...
Man Recovers From Ebola in Germany ...

Man Recovers From Ebola in Germany After Routine Intensive Care

Man Recovers From Ebola in Germany After Routine Intensive CareOne man who contracted Ebola and even had further complications of the infection has now recovered after receiving routine intensive care at a hospital in Germany. The man's case suggests that even if patients do not have access to experimental Ebola drugs, health care workers can still help them recover from the disease, the doctors who treated him wrote in their report of the case. When it comes to treating Ebola patients, "It's supportive care, supportive care, supportive care," Schaffner told Live Science.

Physorg.com

Microsoft beefs up security protect...

Microsoft beefs up security protection in Windows 10

What Microsoft users in business care deeply about?-a system architecture that supports efforts to get their work done efficiently; a work-centric menu to quickly access projects rather than weather readings and movie trailers; and an architecture that helps protect their identity and information. Small wonder that Microsoft is talking up the security feature of its next-generation Windows 10 operating system. Its security measures are impressive in delivering two-factor authentication and other safeguards against malware and data theft.
Spain defends Canaries oil drilling...

Spain defends Canaries oil drilling plan

Spain on Friday launched a legal challenge to defend plans to explore for oil and gas off the Canary Islands, a popular tourist destination.
US official: Auto safety agency und...

US official: Auto safety agency under review

Transportation officials are reviewing the "safety culture" of the U.S. agency that oversees auto recalls, a senior Obama administration official said Friday. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration has been criticized by lawmakers and safety advocates for not acting aggressively enough regarding millions of vehicles with defective air bags or faulty ignition switches.
Out-of-patience investors sell off ...

Out-of-patience investors sell off Amazon

Amazon has long acted like an ideal customer on its own website: a freewheeling big spender with no worries about balancing a checkbook. Investors confident in founder and CEO Jeff Bezos' invest-and-expand strategy flooded into the stock as the company revolutionized shopping, upended the book industry and took on the cloud?even though its vast range of initiatives ate up all the company's profits.
Ebola.com domain sold for big payou...

Ebola.com domain sold for big payout

The owners of the website Ebola.com have scored a big payday with the outbreak of the epidemic, selling the domain for more than $200,000 in cash and stock.
Lava creeps toward road on Hawaii's...

Lava creeps toward road on Hawaii's Big Island

A growing lava stream threatening homes on Hawaii's Big Island is expanding as it heads toward a small rural town.

PBS

Spinosaurus vs. Alligator

Spinosaurus vs. Alligator

A tame alligator named Bubba betrays the secrets of the largest predator that ever lived.
Killer Landslides

Killer Landslides

Explore the forces behind deadly landslides?and the danger zones for the next big one.
Zombies and Calculus

Zombies and Calculus

The zombie apocalypse is here, and calculus explains why we can't quite finish them off.
Zombies and Calculus, Part 2

Zombies and Calculus, Part 2

You're being chased by zombies, and understanding tangent vectors may save your life.
Bigger Than T. rex

Bigger Than T. rex

Meet ?the lost killer of the Cretaceous and the world's largest predator ever.
Emperor's Ghost Army

Emperor's Ghost Army

Explore the buried clay warriors, chariots, and bronze weapons of China's first emperor.

Scientific American

Hospitals Need Time, Training to Ge...

Hospitals Need Time, Training to Get Ready for Ebola

New Ebola guidelines for hospitals may help, but workers need training and support to be adequately prepared for new cases -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
Inside the 4 U.S. Biocontainment Ho...

Inside the 4 U.S. Biocontainment Hospitals That Are Stopping Ebola [Video]

Four small but well-equipped wards across the U.S. provide a front line of treatment for highly infectious diseases and bioterrorism attacks -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
5 Myths about Serial Killers and Wh...

5 Myths about Serial Killers and Why They Persist [Excerpt]

A criminologist contrasts the stories surrounding serial homicide with real data to help explain society’s macabre fascination with these tales -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
Can General Anesthesia Trigger Deme...

Can General Anesthesia Trigger Dementia?

Scientists try to untangle the relationship between a temporary effect and a permanent condition -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
Hundreds of Comets Seen Orbiting Di...

Hundreds of Comets Seen Orbiting Distant Solar System

The “exocomets” swarming around Beta Pictoris mirror those seen in our own solar system, but for a few surprising differences. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
Ancient Halo Stars Cast the Milky W...

Ancient Halo Stars Cast the Milky Way?s First Light

Hubble spots a star in our galaxy’s halo that likely predates its oldest star clusters -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

Newscientist

Legalise online protests to safegua...

Legalise online protests to safeguard democracy

Internet law needs reform, because criminalising online activism undermines democracy and freedom of speech, says media researcher Molly Sauter
African baby turtles start life wit...

African baby turtles start life with a 24-hour swimathon

Loggerhead turtles from Cape Verde complete an epic sprint before they turn into chilled-out turtle surfers, like the ones in Finding Nemo
Biological litmus paper detects Ebo...

Biological litmus paper detects Ebola strains

Litmus paper embedded with DNA from jellyfish and other organisms has the potential to identify any biological molecule ? changing how infections are diagnosed
Asteroid miners to launch first pri...

Asteroid miners to launch first private space telescope

Private company Planetary Resources, which one day hopes to mine asteroids, is preparing to launch a prototype of a telescope designed to find them
Today on New Scientist

Today on New Scientist

All the latest on newscientist.com: humanity's next 1000 years, future Ebola explosions, slumdog mapmakers, seeing brain chatter, Interstellar and more
Cutting off the Ebola zone would be...

Cutting off the Ebola zone would be a mistake

Travel bans aren't the answer: distancing ourselves from countries and people afflicted with Ebola could prove tragic for the world

NY times.com Science

First Patient Quarantined Under Str...

First Patient Quarantined Under Strict New Policy Is Cleared of Ebola

A nurse quarantined in Newark was found to be free of the virus. She is held under a strict new policy for travelers arriving in New York and New Jersey who had direct contacts with Ebola patients in West Africa.
E.U. Greenhouse Gas Deal Falls Shor...

E.U. Greenhouse Gas Deal Falls Short of Expectations

The varied energy needs and capacity of member nations led to concessions and compromises that experts say watered down an agreement meant to pressure other countries at climate talks in 2015.
Bellevue Back on Front Line in Anot...

Bellevue Back on Front Line in Another Crisis

Bellevue Hospital Center has long been on the front line of global health crises. But rising to the challenge of New York City?s first Ebola case may be one of its biggest tests.
Doctor in New York City Is Sick Wit...

Doctor in New York City Is Sick With Ebola

Dr. Craig Spencer, who returned from Guinea last week, remains in isolation at Bellevue Hospital Center. Authorities are tracing anyone who might have come into contact with him recently.
New Ebola Quarantine Protocol Seen ...

New Ebola Quarantine Protocol Seen as Barrier to Volunteers

Requirements for isolating people who had contact with Ebola patients, like those announced in New York and New Jersey, could dissuade Americans from working at the front lines of the epidemic.
Ebola Patient in New York Is Called...

Ebola Patient in New York Is Called a Doctor at Ease in Danger

Friends and former classmates of Dr. Craig Spencer, who tested positive for Ebola in New York, described him as driven and with an unshakable belief in helping others no matter the place.

Science Daily

NASA identifies ice cloud above cru...

NASA identifies ice cloud above cruising altitude on Titan

NASA scientists have identified an unexpected high-altitude methane ice cloud on Saturn's moon Titan that is similar to exotic clouds found far above Earth's poles.
NASA's Fermi satellite finds hints ...

NASA's Fermi satellite finds hints of starquakes in magnetar 'storm'

NASA's Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope detected a rapid-fire "storm" of high-energy blasts from a highly magnetized neutron star, also called a magnetar, on Jan. 22, 2009. Now astronomers analyzing this data have discovered underlying signals related to seismic waves rippling throughout the magnetar.
Illusions in the cosmic clouds: New...

Illusions in the cosmic clouds: New image of spinning neutron star

Pareidolia is the psychological phenomenon where people see recognizable shapes in clouds, rock formations, or otherwise unrelated objects or data. There are many examples of this phenomenon on Earth and in space.
MAVEN ultraviolet image of comet Si...

MAVEN ultraviolet image of comet Siding Spring's hydrogen coma

NASA's Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution (MAVEN) spacecraft obtained this ultraviolet image of hydrogen surrounding comet C/2013 A1 Siding Spring on Oct. 17, 2014, two days before the comet's closest approach to Mars. The Imaging Ultraviolet Spectrograph (IUVS) instrument imaged the comet at a distance of 5.3 million miles (8.5 million kilometers).
Mars Orbiter's spectrometer shows O...

Mars Orbiter's spectrometer shows Oort comet's coma

The Compact Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) observed comet C/2013 A1 Siding Spring as the comet sped close to Mars on Oct. 19. CRISM recorded imaging data in 107 different wavelengths, showing the inner part of the cloud of dust, called the coma, surrounding the comet's nucleus.
Galactic wheel of life shines in in...

Galactic wheel of life shines in infrared

It might look like a spoked wheel or even a "Chakram" weapon wielded by warriors like "Xena," from the fictional TV show, but this ringed galaxy is actually a vast place of stellar life. A newly released image from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope shows the galaxy NGC 1291. Though the galaxy is quite old, roughly 12 billion years, it is marked by an unusual ring where newborn stars are igniting.

Eureka Alert

NJIT hosts the NJ mayors' Summit on...

NJIT hosts the NJ mayors' Summit on Resilient Design

(New Jersey Institute of Technology) Local mayors and state and federal experts will gather at New Jersey Institute of Technology to discuss how the state has recovered from two of the worst natural disasters ever to hit New Jersey: Hurricanes Sandy and Irene.
New Alzheimer's association researc...

New Alzheimer's association research grants fund multiple investigations of non-drug treatments

(Alzheimer's Association) As millions of baby boomers are entering the age of greatest risk for Alzheimer's disease, many recent late-stage drug trials have produced negative results. While the majority of drug trials are funded by government and pharmaceutical companies, the Alzheimer's Association is filling a gap in research by funding several new studies of non-drug therapies.
UT Dallas team infuses science into...

UT Dallas team infuses science into 'Minecraft' modification

(University of Texas at Dallas) The 3-D world of the popular 'Minecraft' video game just became more entertaining, perilous and educational, thanks to a comprehensive code modification kit, 'Polycraft World,' created by UT Dallas professors, students and alumni
Startups should seek quality -- not...

Startups should seek quality -- not quantity -- in partnerships, study finds

(University at Buffalo) When partnering with larger companies, startups with a small number of carefully chosen alliances will reap the most benefits, according to new research from the University at Buffalo School of Management.
APIC Ebola readiness survey finding...

APIC Ebola readiness survey findings

(Association for Professionals in Infection Control) Only 6 percent of US hospitals are well-prepared to receive a patient with the Ebola virus, according to a survey of infection prevention experts at US hospitals conducted Oct. 10-15 by the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology.
Volunteer guidelines for clinicians...

Volunteer guidelines for clinicians in the ebola epidemic

(Society for Disaster Medicine and Public Health) A consortium of Boston-based hospitals has prepared a set of guidelines, titled 'Sign Me Up: Rules of the Road for Humanitarian Volunteers during the Ebola Outbreak'. The authors paint an honest picture of volunteer circumstances, and ask those considering volunteering to not make the decision lightly. They insist that the 'global healthcare community must and will rise to serve.'

Forteantimes

Thur 23 Oct - Daily round-up of the...

Thur 23 Oct - Daily round-up of the world's weird news

Sex toy clown attack, Hitler coffee creamer PR disaster, man fights off bear with old computer, return of the Swedish mystery subs
Tue 21 Oct - Daily round-up of the ...

Tue 21 Oct - Daily round-up of the world's weird news

Cannabis-eating sheep munch 4,000 worth of drugs, mystery clowns in Portsmouth and France, flying man baffles plane passengers
Fri 17 Oct - Daily round-up of the ...

Fri 17 Oct - Daily round-up of the world's weird news

Grandma texts from beyond the grave, smugglers stuff 25 cows into oil tanker, man admits to having sex with 700 cars
Wed 15 Oct - Daily round-up of the ...

Wed 15 Oct - Daily round-up of the world's weird news

Crabzilla conquers the Internet, giant squid attacks Greenpeace, missing parrot returns after four years speaking Spanish
Mon 13 Oct - Daily round-up of the ...

Mon 13 Oct - Daily round-up of the world's weird news

California terrorised by copycat clowns, vampire grave found in Bulgaria, Donald Trump evicts golf resort ghost
Fri 25 July 2014 - Daily round-up o...

Fri 25 July 2014 - Daily round-up of the world's weird news

Police investigate creepy doorstep dolls, doctors remove 232 teeth from boy's mouth, Jesus takes the wheel and runs over motorcyclist

Howstuffworks

The Most Embarrassing Moments in th...

The Most Embarrassing Moments in the History of Science

What? Scientists get things wrong? We know. It?s shocking to hear, but science isn?t always an exact science. Mistakes do happen -- and they often lead to great scientific discoveries. So, grab your safety glasses and see if you can identify the most embarrassing scientific moments ever.
10 Completely False ?Facts? Everyon...

10 Completely False ?Facts? Everyone Knows

The blood in your veins is blue. Glass is a slow-moving liquid. If you touch a baby bird, its mother will abandon it. Not so fast ?- if you learned any of those "facts" in school, what you learned was wrong.
Flight Pictures

Flight Pictures

Flight pictures show photos from aviation history. Take a look at pictures of the most important aircraft in history.
How the Electoral College Works

How the Electoral College Works

The Electoral College is not an Ivy League school. Rather, it's a process for selecting the next U.S. president that actually carries more weight than the popular vote. Why is it there and should it be continued?
What is a Nor'easter?

What is a Nor'easter?

Nor'easters typically affect the east coast of the United States during the winter season. What exactly are Nor'easters, though, and how do they form. Find out the answer to this question in this article from HowStuffWorks.

Unexplained-mysteries

Sphinx head found in mystery Greek ...

Sphinx head found in mystery Greek tomb

Archaeologists have uncovered a number of artefacts during excavations of the enigmatic burial site. The tomb, which is thought to date back to betwee...
Richard Dawkins proposes 'cosmic to...

Richard Dawkins proposes 'cosmic tombstone'

The evolutionary biologist has suggested sending a record of our civilization out in to space. While Dawkins' prediction of our inevitable demise seem...
Radiation could thwart future space...

Radiation could thwart future space travel

Sending humans in to space is set to become more difficult due to cosmic radiation exposure. One of the more understated dangers of manned space trave...
Megalodon extinction gave whales a ...

Megalodon extinction gave whales a boost

The disappearance of the world's biggest shark may have enabled whales to grow to huge sizes. A shark of monstrous proportions that once dominated the...
Infrared Nessie photograph to be re...

Infrared Nessie photograph to be revealed

Loch Ness Monster hunter Jonathan Bright will present the image at Scotland's first paranormal festival. Bright is set to travel to Stirling in time f...
Would you drink milk grown in a lab...

Would you drink milk grown in a lab ?

The world's first in vitro hamburger could soon be accompanied by a nice glass of lab grown milk. In an effort to further advance the field of artific...

Sciencenewsforkids.org

Stone Age stencils: Really old art

Stone Age stencils: Really old art

Scientists thought that cave art started in Europe. New analyses now dash that assessment. Stencils in an Indonesian cave are every bit as old as the better-known drawings in caves in France and Spain.
How science saved the Eiffel Tower

How science saved the Eiffel Tower

The Eiffel Tower was an engineering masterpiece. But Parisians initially thought it too ugly to let stand for more than 20 years. So Eiffel made the tower a bastion of science. And that would soon ensure that the structure was too valuable to tear down.
Fun facts about the Eiffel Tower

Fun facts about the Eiffel Tower

Here are some details of what it took to design, build ? and what it now takes to maintain ? this icon of the Paris skyline.
Questions for How Science Saved the...

Questions for How Science Saved the Eiffel Tower

Classroom questions for "How Science Saved the Eiffel Tower."
Pills of frozen poop fight killer d...

Pills of frozen poop fight killer disease

Popping poop pills? Of course it sounds yucky. But researchers find it might just be one of the most effective ways to knock out a very serious ? and tough-to-kill ? intestinal disease.
Explainer: What is C. difficile?

Explainer: What is C. difficile?

Over the past two decades, these severe bacterial infections have evolved from a no-big-deal occurrence to a common, life-threatening problem.

PopSci

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