Discovery

Could Clay Help Attack Superbugs?

Could Clay Help Attack Superbugs?

The ancient remedy could provide a new weapon against microbes Continue reading ?
DNews: The Dreaded Turbulence: What...

DNews: The Dreaded Turbulence: What Makes Flights Bumpy

Most of us probably breathe a sigh of relief when the captain promises "a smooth ride" to wherever we're flying. But, as DNews explains, turbulence is really no big deal.
Why Antarctic Sea Ice Isn't Shrinki...

Why Antarctic Sea Ice Isn't Shrinking

Winds, currents and seafloor features may be responsible for keeping Antarctica's sea ice intact.
Why Is India's Heat Wave Off the Ch...

Why Is India's Heat Wave Off the Chart?

An oppressive heat wave in India led to a record temperature of 123.8 degrees Fahrenheit -- the highest ever in Asia.
Live on a Farm by the Sea for Just ...

Live on a Farm by the Sea for Just $1.50

A four-bedroom bungalow and 416 sheep are all covered by the annual rent. Scenic views available at no additional cost. Continue reading ?
US: 1 in 8 Swimming Pools Closed fo...

US: 1 in 8 Swimming Pools Closed for Health Violations

One in eight swimming pools in five populous states are closed upon inspection due to dirty and potentially dangerous water, the CDC reported this week. Continue reading ?

Yahoo Science

Can you get cancer from tap water? ...

Can you get cancer from tap water? New study says even 'safe' drinking water poses risk

Can you get cancer from tap water? New study says even 'safe' drinking water poses riskAn Environmental Working Group study suggests that 22 carcinogens found in tap water ? including arsenic ? could result in over 100,000 cancer cases.


Chernobyl's 'sarcophagus...

Chernobyl's 'sarcophagus' is getting dismantled because it's teetering on collapse. Photos reveal the structure's rise and fall.

Chernobyl's 'sarcophagus' is getting dismantled because it's teetering on collapse. Photos reveal the structure's rise and fall.More than 33 years after the Chernobyl disaster, workers have to dismantle the protective sarcophagus before it comes tumbling down.


Scientists Identify Neurons That He...

Scientists Identify Neurons That Help the Brain Forget

Scientists Identify Neurons That Help the Brain ForgetOne afternoon in April 1929, a journalist from a Moscow newspaper turned up in Alexander Luria's office with an unusual problem: He never forgot things.Luria, a neuropsychologist, proceeded to test the man, who later became known as subject S., by spouting long strings of numbers and words, foreign poems and scientific formulas, all of which S. recited back without fail. Decades later, S. still remembered the lists of numbers perfectly whenever Luria retested him.But S.'s ability to remember was also a hindrance in everyday life. He had a hard time understanding abstract concepts or figurative language, and he was terrible at recognizing faces because he had memorized them at an exact point in time, with specific facial expressions and features. The ability to forget, scientists eventually came to realize, was just as vital as the ability to remember."We're inundated with so much information every day, and much of that information is turned into memories in the brain," said Ronald Davis, a neurobiologist at the Scripps Research Institute in Jupiter, Florida. "We simply cannot deal with all of it."Researchers like Davis argue that forgetting is an active mechanism that the brain employs to clear out unnecessary pieces of information so we can retain new ones. Others have gone a step further, suggesting that forgetting is required for the mental flexibility inherent in creative thinking and imagination.A new paper, published Thursday in the journal Science, points to a group of neurons in the brain that may be responsible for helping the brain to forget. Akihiro Yamanaka, a neuroscientist at Nagoya University in Japan, and his team stumbled across the cells, known as melanin-concentrating hormone, or MCH, neurons, while studying sleep regulation in mice.Unlike most of the brain's neurons, which are active when animals are awake, MCH neurons in the hypothalamus start firing electrical signals most actively when a sleeping animal is in a stage called REM sleep. This phase of sleep is characterized by rapid eye movement, an elevated pulse, unique brain waves and, in humans, vivid dreams. When the researchers tracked MCH signals in mice, they found that the cells were suppressing neurons in the hippocampus, a brain region known to play a role in the consolidation of memory.To evaluate the effects of the MCH neurons on memory, the researchers used genetic tools to turn MCH neurons on and off before mice performed some memory tests. First, the researchers presented the mice with a tiny plastic banana and a wooden toy to explore side by side. After each animal sniffed out both items, the researchers artificially activated or inhibited its MCH neurons. Then they put each mouse back in the test cage, where one of the toys had been swapped out for a new item.To the scientists' surprise, "turning on" MCH cells during the retention period worsened memory; the mice did not remember which toys they had already seen and smelled. They approached the familiar wooden or plastic toy with the same frequency as the new one. But mice that had their MCH neurons artificially suppressed were more likely to play with the new item, indicating that they had formed stronger memories of the initial items and did not need to explore them again.The change in behavior was so obvious that researchers could tell just by observing the mice which ones had their MCH neurons suppressed. And the effects were visible only if the MCH neurons were inhibited during REM sleep; inhibiting the cells while the mice were awake or during a different part of the sleep cycle did not improve their performance on the memory test."These results suggest that hypothalamic MCH neurons help the brain actively forget new information that is not important," Yamanaka said. And because the neurons are most active during REM sleep, they may explain why humans usually do not remember their dreams when they wake up. "The neurons may be clearing up memory resources for the next day," Yamanaka said.But there are likely to be many processes regulating how and when the brain forgets, just as there is with recollection."As we learn, and as other animals learn throughout the day, various forgetting mechanisms may always be slowly eroding memory," Davis said. Changes in the firing pattern of neurons, the weakening of synapses and the generation of new neurons in the brain have all been shown to contribute to some level of memory loss.Davis' studies in fruit flies indicate that the neurotransmitter dopamine is involved in both forming and forgetting memories. His theory is that after a memory is formed, the slow, continual release of additional dopamine triggers a cascade of biochemical reactions in the neurons that store the memory, and that this eventually removes the memory unless another brain mechanism deems it important and intervenes."If the memory is really important to the organism, or to us as humans, then this attention or emotional interest will come in and act like a judge, telling the brain, 'Keep this one, protect it,'" Davis said.It would make sense that the regions and mechanisms in the brain that are involved in memory formation are also connected to memory removal, Davis said. If you wanted to make changes to your house -- by painting a room, say -- and a few months or years later you decided to adopt a trendy new color, you would first go back and strip out the old paint.But we are far from the day, if it ever comes, when traumatic memories can be erased or sunny ones are made easier to recall, Yamanaka said. For now, such possibilities belong to the realm of movies like "Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind."This article originally appeared in The New York Times.(C) 2019 The New York Times Company


Before Area 51, the US' first &...

Before Area 51, the US' first 'UFO' controversy uncovered a top-secret military project

Before Area 51, the US' first 'UFO' controversy uncovered a top-secret military projectThe plan to storm Area 51 is one chapter in a history of conspiracy theories about alien encounters. Before Area 51, there was Roswell, New Mexico.


'Largest polar expedition in hi...

'Largest polar expedition in history' to probe Arctic climate

'Largest polar expedition in history' to probe Arctic climateA team of scientists from 19 countries will set off for the Arctic on Friday, aiming to freeze their ship into the polar ice for a year to research the changing climate. The 140 million-euro ($155 million) mission will study the atmosphere, ocean, sea ice, ecosystem and natural processes -- looking to build a picture of how climate change is affecting the region and the entire world. "No other region of the world has warmed as quickly as the Arctic in the past decades," mission leader and atmospheric scientist Markus Rex said on the "Mosaic" (Multidisciplinary drifting Observatory for the Study of Arctic Climate) website.


How 16-year-old Greta Thunberg beca...

How 16-year-old Greta Thunberg became the face of climate-change activism

How 16-year-old Greta Thunberg became the face of climate-change activismGreta Thunberg has met with world leaders, led climate strikes, sailed across the Atlantic, and been nominated for a Nobel Peace Prize.


Physorg.com

Hurricane Lorena threatens Mexico's...

Hurricane Lorena threatens Mexico's Los Cabos resort

Hurricane Lorena regained strength Friday as it closed in on Mexico's Baja California peninsula and the turquoise-water beaches of popular tourist destination Los Cabos.
Daily rainfall over Sumatra linked ...

Daily rainfall over Sumatra linked to larger atmospheric phenomenon

Around the globe, communities are concerned with rain and storms. An area known as the "Maritime Continent," which includes major islands such as Sumatra, Java, Borneo, Papua New Guinea, along with a galaxy of smaller islands, experiences significant rainfall including periodic monsoonal rain, and flash flooding.
Study: Many Tennesseans are misinfo...

Study: Many Tennesseans are misinformed about tornado protection

More people die during tornadoes in the Southeast than anywhere else in the United States. And still, a lot of people have misconceptions about their risk of being impacted by tornadoes, according to a new study published in PLOS One by researchers at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville.
Lab develops novel approach to stud...

Lab develops novel approach to study sound recognition in acoustically orienting animals

If you wander outside on these late summer nights, you might hear the din of calling songs from field crickets. Male crickets produce these songs to attract their mates?but they may also draw the attention of acoustically orienting parasitiod flies. The fly Ormia ochracea has evolved directionally sensitive ears to eavesdrop on the communication signals of field crickets. Crickets that are parasitized by these flies face almost certain death. How these flies recognize cricket songs and whether crickets can change their love songs to avoid parasitism is unknown.
Climate change study finds that map...

Climate change study finds that maple syrup season may come earlier

Once winter nights dip below freezing and the days warm up above freezing sap begins to flow in sugar maples marking the start of the syrup season. U.S. maple syrup production is a global industry, which has been increasing by nearly 10 percent per year over the past decade according to the USDA's National Agricultural Statistics Service 2017. With climate change, daily temperatures are on the rise, which affects sap flow and sugar content. By 2100, the maple syrup season in eastern North America may be one month earlier than it was during 1950 and 2017, according to a study published in Forest Ecology and Management.
NASA catches Tropical Storm Tapah b...

NASA catches Tropical Storm Tapah by the tail

Tropical Storm Tapah has a huge "tail" on NASA satellite imagery. NASA's Terra satellite captured an image of the northwestern Pacific Ocean storm that revealed a large band of thunderstorms that resemble a large tail. The NASA imagery also indicated that the storm is getting better organized.

PBS

Antibiotic-resistant bacteria in fa...

Antibiotic-resistant bacteria in farm animals are rising in low- and middle-income countries

That spells trouble for the entire planet.
An ancient asteroid collision foste...

An ancient asteroid collision fostered life on Earth

A new study suggests a plume of dust once blocked the sun?s rays from Earth, triggering an ice age some 466 million years ago.
Scientists are about to lock themse...

Scientists are about to lock themselves into an Arctic ice floe for a year

In the largest Arctic expedition yet, researchers will gather as much data as they can on the fading ice?and climate change.
Soot from polluted air can reach th...

Soot from polluted air can reach the fetal side of the placenta

A new study hints at the ways in which air pollution may directly impact a fetus.
Astronomers may have just detected ...

Astronomers may have just detected the most massive neutron star yet

It?s almost too dense to exist. Almost.
Astronomers discover two giant, hig...

Astronomers discover two giant, high-energy ?bubbles? at the center of the Milky Way

The gargantuan structures hint at a massive explosion in our galaxy?s past.

Scientific American

Suicide Data Reveal New Interventio...

Suicide Data Reveal New Intervention Spots, Such as Motels and Animal Shelters

Patterns show places where people who intend to kill themselves go—and give health workers better chances to stop them

-- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
Possible Carcinogen Found in a Comm...

Possible Carcinogen Found in a Common Heartburn Medication Is Present in Some Foods

Some forms of the drug ranitidine—including Zantac—have been shown to contain low levels of NDMA, which causes cancer in rats

-- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
Silent Skies: Billions of North Ame...

Silent Skies: Billions of North American Birds Have Vanished

Though waterfowl and raptor populations have made recoveries, bird populations have declined since 1970 across nearly all habitats

-- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
New Measurement Aims to Solve Neutr...

New Measurement Aims to Solve Neutrino Mystery

A new finding limits how much the bizarre particle can weigh, shedding light on a physics quandary

-- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
A Newly Identified Protein May Be t...

A Newly Identified Protein May Be the Key to Vanquishing the Common Cold

Inactivating this protein in human cells and mice provided immunity to a range of viruses, but an effective treatment is still a long way off

-- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
Hunt for Cause of Vaping Illness Su...

Hunt for Cause of Vaping Illness Suggests Multiple Mechanisms of Damage

The leading hypothesis for the appearance of deadly lung problems does not fit with all presentations of the illness

-- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

Newscientist

Herpes vaccine to be tested in huma...

Herpes vaccine to be tested in humans after best result yet in animals

Hopes for a genital herpes vaccine have been raised by a trial treatment that stops genital lesions and low-lying infections in guinea pigs and mice
Mystery of why humans walk upright ...

Mystery of why humans walk upright may be explained by surprise fossil

We thought that walking on all fours like a gorilla is more primitive than walking on two legs as humans do. But new fossils suggest even very ancient apes walked upright
Autonomous killer drones set to be ...

Autonomous killer drones set to be used by Turkey in Syria

Turkey is to become the first nation to use drones able to find, track and kill people without human intervention, when it deploys them in Syria in a few months
Global climate strikes: millions ta...

Global climate strikes: millions take to the streets to demand action

Hundreds of thousands of adults and children from Sydney to London have taken to the streets today as part of a global strike against governments? inaction on climate change
Stars that eat planets can start sp...

Stars that eat planets can start spinning so fast they rip apart

When a star engulfs a planet it can end up spinning so fast that it rips apart. The resulting debris could help us learn about exoplanets that were consumed
Drone equipped with nail gun can fi...

Drone equipped with nail gun can fix the roof so you don't have to

A drone equipped with a nail gun can autonomously hover over a roof and fix tiles in place. Tests showed it was highly precise and held steady while firing

NY times.com Science

Birds Are Vanishing From North Amer...

Birds Are Vanishing From North America

The number of birds in the United States and Canada has declined by 3 billion, or 29 percent, over the past half-century, scientists find.
Scientists Identify Neurons That He...

Scientists Identify Neurons That Help the Brain Forget

In mice, cells in the hypothalamus clear out old memories while the animals sleep.
It?s a Dirty Job, but Someone Has t...

It?s a Dirty Job, but Someone Has to Do It and Not Get Eaten

Cleaner shrimp appear to have developed a strategy that protects them from predators they get very close to.
How to Cool a Planet With Extraterr...

How to Cool a Planet With Extraterrestrial Dust

A study of fossil meteorites suggests that a distant asteroid collision once sent Earth into an ice age.
Hurricanes May Kill Some Birds, but...

Hurricanes May Kill Some Birds, but Humans Are the Real Threat

When the time comes to assess the environmental damage from Hurricane Dorian, one species may be extinct, but it's not Dorian's fault
The Most Powerful Lightning Strikes...

The Most Powerful Lightning Strikes in Unexpected Places

Superbolts are extremely rare, and thousands of times more powerful than the tendrils in the typical electrical storm.

Science Daily

Daily rainfall over Sumatra linked ...

Daily rainfall over Sumatra linked to larger atmospheric phenomenon

Atmospheric scientists reveal details of the connection between a larger atmospheric phenomenon, termed the Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO), and the daily patterns of rainfall in the Maritime Continent.
Leukemia drug shows promise for tre...

Leukemia drug shows promise for treating a childhood brain cancer

Researchers describe a new use of leukemia drug, nilotinib, to treat a subtype of medulloblastoma, a deadly pediatric brain cancer.
New vaccine prevents herpes in mice...

New vaccine prevents herpes in mice, guinea pigs

A novel vaccine protected almost all mice and guinea pigs exposed to a new herpes virus. This may lead to the vaccine being tested in human studies.
Climate change study finds that map...

Climate change study finds that maple syrup season may come earlier

Once winter nights dip below freezing and the days warm up above freezing sap begins to flow in sugar maples marking the start of the syrup season. With climate change, daily temperatures are on the rise, which affects sap flow and sugar content. By 2100, the maple syrup season in eastern North America may be one month earlier than it was during 1950 and 2017, according to a new study.
New method for the measurement of n...

New method for the measurement of nano-structured light fields

Physicists and chemists have jointly succeeded in developing a so-called nano-tomographic technique which is able to detect the typically invisible properties of nano-structured fields in the focus of a lens. Such a method may help to establish nano-structured light landscapes as a tool for material machining, optical tweezers, or high-resolution imaging.
How to predict crucial plasma press...

How to predict crucial plasma pressure in future fusion facilities

Feature describes improved model for forecasting the crucial balance of pressure at the edge of a fusion plasma.

Eureka Alert

CPRIT awards $11 million to UTHealt...

CPRIT awards $11 million to UTHealth for cancer research, prevention

(University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston) Five innovative cancer-fighting projects at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth) received just over $11 million during the latest round of grants awarded by the Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas (CPRIT).
Diagnostic radiologists with lifeti...

Diagnostic radiologists with lifetime ABR certificates less likely to participate in MOC

(American Roentgen Ray Society) An ahead-of-print article from AJR discovers lifetime-certified diagnostic radiologists whose Maintenance of Certification was not mandated by the American Board of Radiology were far less likely to participate in ABR MOC programs--especially general radiologists and those working in smaller, nonacademic practices in states with lower population densities 'Many opinions have been expressed regarding MOC in radiology, but there is actually very little public data on the matter,' says Andrew Rosenkrantz, ARRS Leonard Berlin Scholar.
Evolution of learning is key to bet...

Evolution of learning is key to better artificial intelligence

(Michigan State University) Researchers at Michigan State University say that true, human-level intelligence remains a long way off, but their new paper published in The American Naturalist explores how computers could begin to evolve learning in the same way as natural organisms did -- with implications for many fields, including artificial intelligence.
Open Medicare data helps uncover po...

Open Medicare data helps uncover potential hidden costs of health care

(Indiana University) Indiana University scientists have found an association between health care industry payments to medical providers for non-research expenses and what these providers charge for medical services -- shedding new light on potential hidden costs to the public.
Dengue virus becoming resistant to ...

Dengue virus becoming resistant to vaccines and therapeutics due to mutations in specific protein

(Duke-NUS Medical School) Researchers from Duke-NUS Medical School, in collaboration with the Agency for Science, Technology and Research's Bioinformatics Institute, and the University of Texas Medical Branch, USA, have discovered that the dengue virus changes its shape through mutations in Envelope protein to evade vaccines and therapeutics. The study also gives insights on the types of treatment strategies to use at different stages of infection. This could give rise to new approaches in vaccine development and treatment for dengue disease.
Oil futures volatility and the econ...

Oil futures volatility and the economy

(University of Technology Sydney) The drone strike on Saudi Arabia's oil infrastructure has highlighted the fragile and interconnected relationship between crude oil supply and the global economy, with new research bringing these economic ties into greater focus.

Forteantimes

Thur 20 Nov - Daily round-up of the...

Thur 20 Nov - Daily round-up of the world's weird news

Young boy claimed to be reincarnated Marine, four armed baby named God Boy by parents, Bumfight punk body part theft
Mon 17 Nov - Daily round-up of the ...

Mon 17 Nov - Daily round-up of the world's weird news

Philly Jesus goes ice skating, gets arrested, plus: human flesh pastry makers, Swastika bauble outrage and a pair of resurrections
Mon 10 Nov - Daily round-up of the ...

Mon 10 Nov - Daily round-up of the world's weird news

Quadruple amputee is armed and on the run; Man buys home, finds corpse inside; dowsers discover mass grave in Tunbridge Wells
Wed 29 Oct - Daily round-up of the ...

Wed 29 Oct - Daily round-up of the world's weird news

London museum planned to shoot and steal Nessie, Iceland offers Minge Pies for Christmas, plus a ghost in the bathtub
Mon 27 Oct - Daily round-up of the ...

Mon 27 Oct - Daily round-up of the world's weird news

Literary argument ends in death, tiger sex spoof video nightmare, man calls suicide hotline and is shot dead by SWAT team
Thur 23 Oct - Daily round-up of the...

Thur 23 Oct - Daily round-up of the world's weird news

Sex toy clown attack, Hitler coffee creamer PR disaster, man fights off bear with old computer, return of the Swedish mystery subs

Howstuffworks

The Most Embarrassing Moments in th...

The Most Embarrassing Moments in the History of Science

What? Scientists get things wrong? We know. It?s shocking to hear, but science isn?t always an exact science. Mistakes do happen -- and they often lead to great scientific discoveries. So, grab your safety glasses and see if you can identify the most embarrassing scientific moments ever.
10 Completely False ?Facts? Everyon...

10 Completely False ?Facts? Everyone Knows

The blood in your veins is blue. Glass is a slow-moving liquid. If you touch a baby bird, its mother will abandon it. Not so fast ?- if you learned any of those "facts" in school, what you learned was wrong.
Flight Pictures

Flight Pictures

Flight pictures show photos from aviation history. Take a look at pictures of the most important aircraft in history.
How the Electoral College Works

How the Electoral College Works

The Electoral College is not an Ivy League school. Rather, it's a process for selecting the next U.S. president that actually carries more weight than the popular vote. Why is it there and should it be continued?
What is a Nor'easter?

What is a Nor'easter?

Nor'easters typically affect the east coast of the United States during the winter season. What exactly are Nor'easters, though, and how do they form. Find out the answer to this question in this article from HowStuffWorks.

Unexplained-mysteries

'The Thing' discovered beneath the ...

'The Thing' discovered beneath the Antarctic

Scientists have discovered a very strange gelatinous creature 3,500 meters beneath the ocean's surface. Likened by some to the terrifying alien creatu...
Medication causes woman's blood to ...

Medication causes woman's blood to turn blue

A 25-year-old woman who was using a common pain relief drug for toothache ended up with inky blue blood. The patient, who hails from Rhode Island, had...
'Storm Area 51' could be a disaster...

'Storm Area 51' could be a disaster, say locals

Local businesses and authorities are 'preparing for the worst' as crowds start to descend on the region. Despite efforts to dissuade people from turni...
Black panther prowls rooftops in Fr...

Black panther prowls rooftops in France

Authorities were alerted yesterday after residents spotted the escaped animal on a second-floor window ledge. The incident, which occurred in the town...
The face of a woman who lived 7,500...

The face of a woman who lived 7,500 years ago

Forensic experts have created a detailed reconstruction of a Neolithic woman found in a cave in Gibraltar. Named Calpeia in reference to Gibraltar's c...
Downton Abbey 'haunted by footman's...

Downton Abbey 'haunted by footman's ghost'

The owner of Highclere Castle - the real-life Downton Abbey - has spoken out about its haunted past. According to Lady Fiona Carnarvon, the iconic bui...

Sciencenewsforkids.org

That?s no dino!

That?s no dino!

Not all ancient reptiles were dinosaurs. Some soared, many swam the seas and still others looked like dinos?but actually weren?t.
Questions for ?That?s no dino!?

Questions for ?That?s no dino!?

Questions for ?That?s no dino!?
A germ stopper for blood products

A germ stopper for blood products

A new system can disable almost all viruses or bacteria that are lurking in donated blood platelets and plasma.
MERS virus hits South Korea hard

MERS virus hits South Korea hard

MERS ? a killer viral disease ? emerged for the first time only three years ago. That was in the Middle East. Now it has spread to Asia.
Explainer: What is a virus?

Explainer: What is a virus?

Viruses cause many of the world?s common diseases. These germs reproduce by hijacking the cells of their host.
Gulf oil spill: Still poisoning dol...

Gulf oil spill: Still poisoning dolphins to crickets

Once the 2010 Deepwater Horizon spill ended, oil continued to harm animals in the Gulf of Mexico. Five years later, it still may not be over, biologists worry.

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