Discovery

It's a Twofer! Eggplants and Potato...

It's a Twofer! Eggplants and Potatoes in One Plant

It's an eggplant. It's a potato plant. It's both! Continue reading ?
Why Did This Mysterious Crack Appea...

Why Did This Mysterious Crack Appear in Michigan?

A strange and sudden buckling of the earth in Michigan five years ago is now being explained as a limestone bulge. Continue reading ?
Climate Change May Delay Flights

Climate Change May Delay Flights

A new model predicts that warming will speed up the jet stream -- slowing flights coming from Europe to the US East Coast.
Arctic Warms, Antarctic Ice Shelves...

Arctic Warms, Antarctic Ice Shelves Weaken

Low levels of Arctic sea ice and melting Antarctic glaciers and ice shelves are cause for concern. Continue reading ?
Coal Mining Has Flattened Appalachi...

Coal Mining Has Flattened Appalachia by 40 Percent

Knocking the tops off mountains also has altered water flow and made it more susceptible to pollution. Continue reading ?
Fossilized Pollen Reveals Climate C...

Fossilized Pollen Reveals Climate Clues

Fossilized pollen stored inside stalagmites could provide answers about how Earth's climate changed over millions of years. ?

Yahoo Science

Ripple effect: scientists await wor...

Ripple effect: scientists await word on gravitational waves

NASA handout of an artist's rendering of an outburst on a ultra-magnetic neutron star, also called a magnetarBy Will Dunham WASHINGTON (Reuters) - A century ago, Albert Einstein hypothesized the existence of gravitational waves, small ripples in space and time that dash across the universe at the speed of light. On Thursday, at a news conference called by the U.S. National Science Foundation, researchers may announce at long last direct observations of the elusive waves. Such a discovery would represent a scientific landmark, opening the door to an entirely new way to observe the cosmos and unlock secrets about the early universe and mysterious objects like black holes and neutron stars.

NASA delays space station cargo run...

NASA delays space station cargo run due to mold on packing bags

By Irene Klotz CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. (Reuters) - NASA's next cargo run to the International Space Station will be delayed for at least two weeks after black mold was found in two fabric bags used for packing clothing, food and other supplies, the U.S. space agency said on Wednesday. The source of the mold, a common fungal growth in humid climates like Florida's, is under investigation by NASA and Lockheed Martin, which prepares NASA cargo for launch aboard two commercial carriers, Orbital ATK and privately owned SpaceX. An Orbital Cygnus cargo ship was more than halfway packed for the launch, scheduled for March 10, when the mold was found during routine inspections and microbial sampling, NASA spokesman Daniel Huot said.
World's top scientists pledge to sh...

World's top scientists pledge to share all findings to fight Zika

A health technician analyzes a blood sample from a patient bitten by a mosquito at the National Institute of Health in LimaBy Kate Kelland LONDON (Reuters) - Thirty of the world's leading scientific research institutions, journals and funders have pledged to share for free all data and expertise on Zika to speed up the fight against an outbreak of the viral disease spreading across the Americas. Specialists welcomed the initiative, saying it showed how the global health community had learned crucial lessons from West Africa's Ebola epidemic, which killed more than 11,300 people and saw scientists scrambling to conduct research to help in the development of potential treatments and vaccines. Zika, a viral disease carried by mosquitoes, is causing international alarm as an outbreak in Brazil has now spread through much of the Americas.

Researchers find new Zika clues to ...

Researchers find new Zika clues to birth defect in fetus study

Daniele Santos holds her son Juan Pedro who is 2-months old and born with microcephaly at their house in RecifeBy Julie Steenhuysen CHICAGO (Reuters) - Researchers on Wednesday reported new evidence strengthening the association between Zika virus and a spike in birth defects, citing the presence of the virus in the brain of an aborted fetus of a European woman who became pregnant while living in Brazil. An autopsy of the fetus showed microcephaly or small head size, as well as severe brain injury and high levels of the Zika virus in fetal brain tissues, exceeding levels of the virus typically found in blood samples, researchers in Slovenia from the University Medical Center in Ljubljana reported in the New England Journal of Medicine. The findings help "strengthen the biologic association" between Zika virus infection and microcephaly, researchers from the Harvard School of Public Health and Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston, wrote in an editorial that accompanied the paper.

Maths link to future locust dispers...

Maths link to future locust dispersal

A mathematical model of locust swarms could help in the development of new strategies to control their devastating migration, according to British researchers. Mathematicians at the universities of Bath, Warwick, and Manchester analyzed the movements of different group sizes of locusts that had been filmed by colleagues at the University of Adelaide. By studying the interactions between individual locusts they were able to create a mathematical model mimicking the pest's collective behavior.
What Caused This Weird Crack to App...

What Caused This Weird Crack to Appear in Michigan?

What Caused This Weird Crack to Appear in Michigan?A strange and sudden buckling of the earth in Michigan five years ago is now being explained as a limestone bulge, researchers reported today (Feb. 9). The upheaved rock and soil was discovered after a deep boom thundered through the forest near Birch Creek on Michigan's Upper Peninsula, north of Menominee.

Physorg.com

Scientists gain insights into 'forb...

Scientists gain insights into 'forbidden' chemistry

Gabriele Saleh, a research fellow at MIPT, and Prof. Artem Oganov, a Laboratory Supervisor at MIPT and Professor at the Skolkovo Institute of Science and Technology (Skoltech), have discovered what causes the stability of various compounds that are not commonly found in 'textbook' chemistry.
'Electronic nose' determines food f...

'Electronic nose' determines food freshness

A new device analyzes gas mixtures using semiconductor sensors. Odor is determined by a combination of existing gases in the atmosphere. Researchers have found that the conductivity of a semiconductor probe changes during sedimentation of the gas molecules from the atmosphere, which indicates their presence, says Timur Muksunov. During manufacture, the sensor can be customized to react differently to various atmospheric gases.
Israeli navy vet wants to sink smug...

Israeli navy vet wants to sink smugglers with sea of data

Israeli navy veteran Ami Daniel points at his computer screen and explains why the ship he was tracking should have been stopped and searched.
Congress likely to give final OK to...

Congress likely to give final OK to local Internet tax ban

State and local governments would be permanently barred from taxing access to the Internet under a bipartisan compromise that Congress is a step away from sending to President Barack Obama.
Nokia says quarterly profit rose bu...

Nokia says quarterly profit rose but cautions on outlook

Nokia saw fourth quarter profit grow more than 50 percent to 498 million euros ($560 million) on a slight increase in sales, but the telecom networks company cautioned it would face some "market headwinds," especially in China.
Record for fastest data rate set

Record for fastest data rate set

A new record for the fastest ever data rate for digital information has been set by UCL researchers in the Optical Networks Group. They achieved a rate of 1.125 Tb/s as part of research on the capacity limits of optical transmission systems, designed to address the growing demand for fast data rates.

PBS

Explore North America

Explore North America

Trek across this interactive map, collecting geological clues that tell the story of our continent.
Towers of Chalk in Kansas

Towers of Chalk in Kansas

Amidst the flat plains of Kansas are the gorgeous remains of an ancient inland sea.
How Vultures Can Eat Rotten Meat

How Vultures Can Eat Rotten Meat

Why don't vultures get food poisoning?
Making North America: Origins

Making North America: Origins

Experience the colossal geologic forces that shaped our continent over billions of years.
North America Sky Tour

North America Sky Tour

Fly coast to coast to see highlights of how North America took the shape it is today.
A Labyrinth of Lava

A Labyrinth of Lava

The big island of Hawaii is shot through with an underground labyrinth carved out by lava.

Scientific American

Drinking Causes Gut Microbe Imbalan...

Drinking Causes Gut Microbe Imbalance Linked to Liver Disease

In addition to damaging the organ directly, alcohol weakens naturally produced antibiotics, leaving the liver exposed to bacteria and disease -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
How to Hunt for Gravitational Waves...

How to Hunt for Gravitational Waves [Slide Show]

Various experiments seek different versions of this highly sought-after phenomenon -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
Brain Activity for Attention and Me...

Brain Activity for Attention and Memory Tasks Changes with the Seasons

New research shows brain function associated with attention peaks during the summer and dips in winter -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
A Single Concussion May Triple the ...

A Single Concussion May Triple the Long-Term Risk of Suicide

A new study of mild concussions in Canadian adults suggests the risks are even higher for recreational injuries -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
GPS and the World's First "Space Wa...

GPS and the World's First "Space War"

Satellite-based navigation proved its mettle during the 1991 Persian Gulf War, leading to what some say is an overdependence on “jammable” GPS technology -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
Why We Shouldn't Quarantine Travele...

Why We Shouldn't Quarantine Travelers Because of Zika

Contrary to some Republican presidential candidates, public health experts say there should not be any travel or trade restrictions because of the virus  -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

Newscientist

Whole Zika genome recovered from br...

Whole Zika genome recovered from brain of baby with microcephaly

The results of an autopsy offer compelling evidence of a link between the virus and the birth defects
Belief in punitive gods linked with...

Belief in punitive gods linked with expansion of human societies

People who believe in a moralistic god are more likely to help distant strangers who share their religion, which may explain the evolution of complex societies
Einstein?s last theory confirmed? A...

Einstein?s last theory confirmed? A guide to gravitational waves

We're expecting huge physics news tomorrow ? get ahead of the crowd with our primer on gravitational waves
$19 billion NASA budget for 2017 st...

$19 billion NASA budget for 2017 still not enough to get to Mars

The 2017 budget, still to be approved by US Congress, is down $260 million on 2016 and doesn't provide enough funding for crewed Mars missions, say critics
First fully approved ?off the shelf...

First fully approved ?off the shelf? stem cells launch in Japan

The long anticipated age of the stem cell is upon us. Temcell prevents organ transplants attacking their hosts but will be followed by therapies for more common problems
?Dark sunshine? could illuminate th...

?Dark sunshine? could illuminate the search for dark matter

If there?s dark matter hiding in our sun, it could be giving off dark photons. The best part is we already have a detector in space that could spot them

NY times.com Science

That Wasn?t a Meteorite That Killed...

That Wasn?t a Meteorite That Killed a Man in India, NASA Says

A ?land-based? explosion was the likely cause, not an object from space, which would have been a first of sorts in recorded history.
Observatory: Humans Are Spreading D...

Observatory: Humans Are Spreading Deadly Bee Virus, Study Says

Researchers say that the trade and movement of honeybee colonies have caused deformed wing virus to travel all over the world.
Rooftop Solar Providers Face a Clou...

Rooftop Solar Providers Face a Cloudier Future

Losses at rooftop solar companies have mounted as some states have withdrawn their support, and cheap natural gas isn?t helping matters.
Wood Shop Enters the Age of High-Te...

Wood Shop Enters the Age of High-Tech

The D.I.Y. movement ? to get students creating, be it for fun, for art or for entrepreneurship ? is booming. There?s even a MOOC on how to teach tinkering.
Education May Cut Dementia Risk, St...

Education May Cut Dementia Risk, Study Finds

Researchers say people with at least a high school education and healthier lifestyles are aiding a decline in new cases, or staving off dementia longer.
Assisted Suicide Study Questions It...

Assisted Suicide Study Questions Its Use for Mentally Ill

Researchers who looked at doctor-assisted deaths in the Netherlands found that some patients had declined treatment that might have helped.

Science Daily

Room-temperature lithium metal batt...

Room-temperature lithium metal battery closer to reality

Rechargeable lithium metal batteries offer energy storage capabilities far superior to today?s workhorse lithium-ion technology that powers our smartphones and laptops. But these batteries are not in common use today because, when recharged, they spontaneously grow treelike bumps called dendrites that can trigger short-circuiting and cause a potential safety hazard.
Remember where you're going? How sc...

Remember where you're going? How scent helps

In bloodhounds and neutrophils, getting the scent is not enough. Dogs and immune cells have to remember the chemoattractant they are pursuing, even when it momentarily fades out or threatens to overwhelm.
Your brain may be what interests th...

Your brain may be what interests that guy checking you out

Modern men increasingly value brains over beauty when choosing long-term mates, say researchers. While the common view is that our mate choices are evolutionarily "hardwired" in our brains and therefore minimally responsive to changing conditions, some evolutionary scientists now argue that humans are programmed to respond with great flexibility to changing environments.
Mechanism that unwinds DNA may func...

Mechanism that unwinds DNA may function similar to an oil rig 'pumpjack'

DNA is unwound by a type of ?pumpjack? mechanism, similar to the way one operates on an oil rig, a team of scientists suggests. This finding is based on new close-up images of the proteins that unwind DNA inside the nucleus of a yeast cell and could offer insight into ways that DNA replication can go awry and trigger disease.
New cause of strong earthquakes fou...

New cause of strong earthquakes found

A geologic event known as diking can cause strong earthquakes -- with a magnitude between 6 and 7, according to an international research team. Diking can occur all over the world but most often occurs in areas where Earth's tectonic plates are moving apart, such as Iceland, Hawaii and parts of Africa in the East African Rift System.
Fish fins can sense touch

Fish fins can sense touch

The human fingertip is a finely tuned sensory machine, and even slight touches convey a great deal of information about our physical environment. It turns out, some fish use their pectoral fins in pretty much the same way. And do so through a surprisingly similar biological mechanism to mammals -- humans included.

Eureka Alert

INNUENDO -- a new platform for geno...

INNUENDO -- a new platform for genomics integration in surveillance of food-borne pathogens

(University of Helsinki) Multinational outbreaks of food-borne pathogens cause considerable threats to European public health. Implementing a whole genome sequencing (WGS) in routine surveillance and outbreak investigations is becoming a strategic goal for many public health authorities all over the world. With this in mind a group of researchers have developed an initiative called INNUENDO, which aims to deliver a cross-sectorial framework of bacterial WGS integration in routine surveillance and epidemiological investigations.
Why you may skimp on your Valentine...

Why you may skimp on your Valentine's Day gift

(University of Chicago Booth School of Business) In the study, 'The Friendly Taking Effect: How Interpersonal Closeness Leads to Seemingly Selfish Yet Jointly Maximizing Choice,' Chicago Booth researchers find that people are more likely to take from a close other than a distant other. In a series of studies, the researchers determine that this tendency is rooted in a friendly intention of trying to maximize the total benefits for the pair, or the so-called 'self-other collective.'
Research into critical national iss...

Research into critical national issues at forefront of NSF's FY2017 budget request

(National Science Foundation) National Science Foundation (NSF) Director France A. Córdova today outlined how President Obama's fiscal year (FY) 2017 request for NSF supports research into critical national issues, including clean energy technologies, food sustainability, disaster response and education. The FY2017 budget requests $8 billion, an increase of about 6.7 percent, or about $500 million, over the enacted FY2016 budget.
Fostering commercialization to impr...

Fostering commercialization to improve health and create jobs in Washington

(Life Sciences Discovery Fund) A new technology commercialization program will launch this spring to help Washington's life sciences innovators move their promising ideas into the hands of providers and patients, thanks to a $1.8 million 'ecosystem' award from the state's Life Sciences Discovery Fund (LSDF).
Enrichment program introduces Bosto...

Enrichment program introduces Boston undergraduates to careers in medicine or research

(Tufts University, Health Sciences Campus) Twenty-six aspiring undergraduates experienced life as medical students or research scientists during the fourth Tufts University School of Medicine/University of Massachusetts Boston Enrichment program. The undergraduates took part in an intensive curriculum that ran for three weeks at Tufts.
Dr. Gail D'Onofrio & Dr. David Fiel...

Dr. Gail D'Onofrio & Dr. David Fiellin earn Hazelden Betty Ford Foundation Award

(Hazelden Betty Ford Foundation) Gail D'Onofrio, M.D., Professor, Department of Emergency Medicine, Yale School of Medicine and David Fiellin, Professor, Department of Internal Medicine, Yale School of Medicine have earned the latest Dan Anderson Research Award for their study examining the impact of buprenorphine treatment on treatment engagement and opioid use outcomes among opioid dependent patients admitted to the emergency department (ED). The award is sponsored by the Butler Center for Research at the Hazelden Betty Ford Foundation.

Forteantimes

Thur 20 Nov - Daily round-up of the...

Thur 20 Nov - Daily round-up of the world's weird news

Young boy claimed to be reincarnated Marine, four armed baby named God Boy by parents, Bumfight punk body part theft
Mon 17 Nov - Daily round-up of the ...

Mon 17 Nov - Daily round-up of the world's weird news

Philly Jesus goes ice skating, gets arrested, plus: human flesh pastry makers, Swastika bauble outrage and a pair of resurrections
Mon 10 Nov - Daily round-up of the ...

Mon 10 Nov - Daily round-up of the world's weird news

Quadruple amputee is armed and on the run; Man buys home, finds corpse inside; dowsers discover mass grave in Tunbridge Wells
Wed 29 Oct - Daily round-up of the ...

Wed 29 Oct - Daily round-up of the world's weird news

London museum planned to shoot and steal Nessie, Iceland offers Minge Pies for Christmas, plus a ghost in the bathtub
Mon 27 Oct - Daily round-up of the ...

Mon 27 Oct - Daily round-up of the world's weird news

Literary argument ends in death, tiger sex spoof video nightmare, man calls suicide hotline and is shot dead by SWAT team
Thur 23 Oct - Daily round-up of the...

Thur 23 Oct - Daily round-up of the world's weird news

Sex toy clown attack, Hitler coffee creamer PR disaster, man fights off bear with old computer, return of the Swedish mystery subs

Howstuffworks

The Most Embarrassing Moments in th...

The Most Embarrassing Moments in the History of Science

What? Scientists get things wrong? We know. It?s shocking to hear, but science isn?t always an exact science. Mistakes do happen -- and they often lead to great scientific discoveries. So, grab your safety glasses and see if you can identify the most embarrassing scientific moments ever.
10 Completely False ?Facts? Everyon...

10 Completely False ?Facts? Everyone Knows

The blood in your veins is blue. Glass is a slow-moving liquid. If you touch a baby bird, its mother will abandon it. Not so fast ?- if you learned any of those "facts" in school, what you learned was wrong.
Flight Pictures

Flight Pictures

Flight pictures show photos from aviation history. Take a look at pictures of the most important aircraft in history.
How the Electoral College Works

How the Electoral College Works

The Electoral College is not an Ivy League school. Rather, it's a process for selecting the next U.S. president that actually carries more weight than the popular vote. Why is it there and should it be continued?
What is a Nor'easter?

What is a Nor'easter?

Nor'easters typically affect the east coast of the United States during the winter season. What exactly are Nor'easters, though, and how do they form. Find out the answer to this question in this article from HowStuffWorks.

Unexplained-mysteries

Taxi drivers pick up 'phantom fares...

Taxi drivers pick up 'phantom fares' in Japan

Several cab drivers have reported having strange experiences in the area hit by the 2011 tsunami. It might sound like something out of a book of class...
Birds of prey are deliberately star...

Birds of prey are deliberately starting fires

Falcons and kites in Australia have been starting bush fires in an effort to smoke out small animals. While nobody has yet been able to record footage...
Bacteria are able to see the world ...

Bacteria are able to see the world like we do

Scientists have revealed that bacteria are not that dissimilar to us when it comes to sensing light. These microscopic organisms, which can be found a...
'Virgin birth' bamboo shark lays tw...

'Virgin birth' bamboo shark lays two eggs

A female shark at a UK sea life center has laid two eggs despite having had no contact with a male. The white-spotted bamboo shark, which arrived at t...
Notorious Indiana 'hell house' is t...

Notorious Indiana 'hell house' is torn down

A house suspected of being haunted by a demonic entity has been demolished following years of activity. The house was previously the home of Latoya Am...
Gravitational waves announcement im...

Gravitational waves announcement imminent

Scientists are set to make a 'major' announcement about gravitational waves this coming Thursday. The hunt for gravitational waves - ripples in the fa...

Sciencenewsforkids.org

That?s no dino!

That?s no dino!

Not all ancient reptiles were dinosaurs. Some soared, many swam the seas and still others looked like dinos?but actually weren?t.
Questions for ?That?s no dino!?

Questions for ?That?s no dino!?

Questions for ?That?s no dino!?
A germ stopper for blood products

A germ stopper for blood products

A new system can disable almost all viruses or bacteria that are lurking in donated blood platelets and plasma.
MERS virus hits South Korea hard

MERS virus hits South Korea hard

MERS ? a killer viral disease ? emerged for the first time only three years ago. That was in the Middle East. Now it has spread to Asia.
Explainer: What is a virus?

Explainer: What is a virus?

Viruses cause many of the world?s common diseases. These germs reproduce by hijacking the cells of their host.
Gulf oil spill: Still poisoning dol...

Gulf oil spill: Still poisoning dolphins to crickets

Once the 2010 Deepwater Horizon spill ended, oil continued to harm animals in the Gulf of Mexico. Five years later, it still may not be over, biologists worry.

PopSci

There are no news from this channel.

Science News.org

There are no news from this channel.
Feb 11      Hits : 12646
place your ad here
My News Hub