Discovery

Two Asteroid Strikes, Not One, Made...

Two Asteroid Strikes, Not One, Made Twin Craters

They look like the perfect couple formed by a simultaneous two-fer asteroid strike, but Quebec's Clearwater Lakes are nothing of the sort.
Young Arctic Ice Creates New Climat...

Young Arctic Ice Creates New Climate-Driven Era

Thinning Arctic sea ice will reflect less sunlight and melt more quickly, exacerbating climate change. Continue reading ?
Massive Dead Zones Threaten Atlanti...

Massive Dead Zones Threaten Atlantic Sea Life

Dead zones in the Atlantic are witnessed for the first time in the open Atlantic. And the oxygen-depleted waters could lead to massive fish kills.
Explainer: The Toxic Waste Worth Bi...

Explainer: The Toxic Waste Worth Billions of Dollars

The world threw out 41.8 million metric tons of electronic waste in 2014. What happens to e-waste after we discard it?
Mysterious Nazca Lines Formed Ancie...

Mysterious Nazca Lines Formed Ancient Pilgrimage Route

The series of fantastical geoglyphs etched into the desert in Peru may have been used to make pilgrimage to an ancient temple.
NEPAL QUAKE: Key Facts About the Ea...

NEPAL QUAKE: Key Facts About the Earthquake

Overwhelmed doctors make split-second life or death decisions, as the death toll in Nepal crosses, 6,200. Continue reading ?

Yahoo Science

Scientists monitor undersea volcani...

Scientists monitor undersea volcanic eruption off Oregon coast

One of three bottom-pressure/tilt instruments in the summit caldera that is connected to the OOI Cabled Array network at Axial Seamount, located off the Oregon coastBy Courtney Sherwood PORTLAND, Ore. (Reuters) - An undersea volcano about 300 miles (480 km) off Oregon's coast has been spewing lava for the past seven days, confirming forecasts made last fall and giving researchers unique insight into a hidden ocean hot spot, a scientist said on Friday. Researchers know of two previous eruptions by the volcano, dubbed "Axial Seamount" for its location along the axis of an underwater mountain ridge, Oregon State University geologist Bill Chadwick said on Friday. Last year, researchers connected monitoring gear to an undersea cable that, for the first time, allowed them to gather live data on the volcano, whose peak is about 4,900 feet (1,500 meters) below the ocean surface. "The cable allows us to have more sensors and monitoring instruments than ever before, and it's happening in real time," said Chadwick, who also is affiliated with the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

A space odyssey: cosmic rays may da...

A space odyssey: cosmic rays may damage the brains of astronauts

This computer-generated view depicts part of Mars at the boundary between darkness and daylight, with an area including Gale Crater beginning to catch morning lightBy Will Dunham WASHINGTON (Reuters) - It may not be space debris, errant asteroids, supply shortages, thruster malfunctions or even the malevolent aliens envisioned in so many Hollywood films that thwart astronauts on any mission to Mars. It may be the ubiquitous galactic cosmic rays. Researchers said on Friday long-term exposure to these rays that permeate space may cause dementia-like cognitive impairments in astronauts during any future round-trip Mars journey, expected to take at least 2-1/2 years. In a NASA-funded study, mice exposed to highly energetic charged particles like those in galactic cosmic rays experienced declines in cognition and changes in the structure and integrity of brain nerve cells and the synapses where nerve impulses are sent and received.

NASA spacecraft makes crashing fina...

NASA spacecraft makes crashing finale into Mercury

An image of the planet Mercury produced by using images from MESSENGER probeBy Irene Klotz CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. (Reuters) - - NASA's pioneering Messenger spacecraft ended its four-year study of the planet Mercury on Thursday by crashing into the planet?s surface, scientists said. Flight controllers at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory in Maryland earlier estimated that Messenger, traveling at more than 8,700 mph (14,000 kph), would hit the ground near Mercury?s north pole at 3:26 p.m. EDT (1926 GMT). It likely gouged a 52-foot-wide (16 meter) crater into Mercury's 's scarred face During its final weeks in orbit, Messenger relayed more details about the innermost planet of the solar system, which turns out to have patches of ice inside some of its craters, despite its sizzling location more than twice as close to the sun as Earth. "We've been concentrating on getting as much of the data down on the ground,? lead researcher Sean Solomon, with Columbia University in New York, wrote in an email.

Jeff Bezos' rocket company test-fli...

Jeff Bezos' rocket company test-flies suborbital spaceship

Handout photo of the New Shepard space vehicle blasting off on its first developmental test flight in west TexasBy Irene Klotz CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. (Reuters) - Blue Origin, a startup space company owned by Amazon.com chief Jeff Bezos, launched an experimental suborbital spaceship from Texas, the first in a series of test flights to develop commercial unmanned and passenger spaceflight services, the company said on Thursday. The New Shepard vehicle blasted off on Wednesday from Blue Origin?s test facility near Van Horn, Texas, and rose to an altitude of 58 miles (93 km) before the capsule separated and parachuted back to Earth. ?Fortunately, we?ve already been in work for some time on an improved hydraulic system ... We?ll be ready to fly again soon." Blue Origin is among a handful of companies developing privately owned spaceships to fly experiments, satellites and passengers into space. Like Virgin Galactic, a U.S. offshoot of Richard Branson?s London-based Virgin Group, and privately owned XCOR Aerospace, Blue Origin is eyeing suborbital spaceflights, which reach altitudes of about 62 miles (100 km), as a stepping stone to orbital flight.

FAA proposes fix for possible power...

FAA proposes fix for possible power loss issue in Boeing's 787

(Reuters) - The U.S. Federal Aviation Administration said it would ask the operators of Boeing Co's model 787 airplanes to deactivate the plane's electrical power system periodically. The FAA said the new airworthiness directive was prompted by the determination that power control units on a model 787 airplane could shut down power generators if they are powered continuously for 248 days. Sudden loss of power could result in the aircraft going out of control, the directive noted. Boeing is developing a software upgrade to counter the problem.
US in Longest 'Hurricane Drought' i...

US in Longest 'Hurricane Drought' in Recorded History

US in Longest 'Hurricane Drought' in Recorded HistoryHurricane Wilma, a hurricane that hit Florida in 2005, was the last Category 3 storm to make landfall in the United States. Other storms ? including Hurricane Ike (Category 2, 2008), Hurricane Irene (Category 1, 2011) and Hurricane Sandy (Category 1, 2012) ? caused significant damage, but their winds weren't as strong. Several storms identified as Category 3 or higher have hit Cuba during the past nine years, but they substantially weakened by the time they reached the United States, the researchers found. "There's been a lot of talk about how unusual the string is, and we want to quantify it," Timothy Hall, the study's lead author and a hurricane researcher at the NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies in New York City, told the American Geophysical Union blog.

Physorg.com

Team reveals the first 'images' of ...

Team reveals the first 'images' of thunder

For the first time, scientists have imaged thunder, visually capturing the sound waves created by artificially triggered lightning. Researchers from Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) are presenting the first images at a joint meeting of American and Canadian geophysical societies in Montreal, Canada, May 3-7.
Yap Island typhoon warning in place...

Yap Island typhoon warning in place for Noul

Tropical Storm Noul is still threatening Yap Island located in the Caroline Islands of the western Pacific Ocean, and a part of the Federated States of Micronesia. Micronesia has posted a typhoon warning for the tiny island. The storm is currently 22 miles south-southwest of Ulithi (one of the outer islands of the State of Yap) and is moving west at 2 knots per hour. Maximum sustained winds for the storm is 55 knots gusting to 70 knots and maximum wave height is 20 feet.
Chest strap heart rate monitor

Chest strap heart rate monitor

A team of Empa scientists has, together with industrial partners, developed a novel chest strap device for the long-term monitoring of patients with heart and circulatory problems. What is special about the new system is that it records an electrocardiogram of the wearer. It is also self-moistening, which is essential for reliable signal monitoring. At the specialist exhibition, Techtextil, held recently in Frankfurt am Main, Germany, the system won the Techtextil Innovation Award 2015.
Two-dimensional material seems to d...

Two-dimensional material seems to disappear, but doesn't

(Phys.org)?When exposed to air, a luminescent 2D material called molybdenum telluride (MoTe2) appears to decompose within a couple days, losing its optical contrast and becoming virtually transparent. But when scientists probed further, they found that the disappearance is an illusion: the material remains structurally stable, and only its material properties change. The results reveal insight into the environmental stability and unusual properties of a newer class of 2D materials called transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs).
Court: Warrantless cellphone tracki...

Court: Warrantless cellphone tracking not illegal search

Investigators do not need a search warrant to obtain cellphone tower location records in criminal prosecutions, a federal appeals court ruled Tuesday in a closely-watched case involving the rules for changing technology.
Researchers use supercomputing to a...

Researchers use supercomputing to assess the impact of climate change on the country's growing season

Malawi, a small landlocked country in southeast Africa, is home to 13 million people and is one of the least-developed countries in the world. As a nation that relies on subsistence farming, its security is highly dependent on rain-fed agriculture, including the crops maize, rice, and sweet potatoes. Changes in rainfall patterns associated with climate change can be devastating to people living in the country, leading to food crises, famines, and loss of life.

PBS

A Photomosaic of U-166

A Photomosaic of U-166

A high-res mapping expert pieces together thousands of images to make one wide shot of the U-166 wreck site.
The Castrating Zombie Parasite

The Castrating Zombie Parasite

This parasite makes male crabs think that they?re pregnant females.
Manhunt?Boston Bombers

Manhunt?Boston Bombers

Which technologies worked—and which didn't—in the race to track down the men behind the marathon attack?
Kangaroo Gas and Global Warming

Kangaroo Gas and Global Warming

Can kangaroo farts teach us how to make cattle and other livestock more eco-friendly?
Invisible Universe Revealed

Invisible Universe Revealed

Follow the historic rescue of Hubble—the space telescope that unveiled the cosmos.
Nazi Attack on America

Nazi Attack on America

A sunken German U-boat off the coast of New Orleans tells the story of Operation Drumbeat.

Scientific American

Humanoid Robo-Clerk Not Fooling Sho...

Humanoid Robo-Clerk Not Fooling Shoppers Just Yet

A lifelike, if stilted, robot makes her debut at a Japanese department store, while a smaller bot is ready to answer questions at a local bank -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
Astronomers Seek Super-Size Hubble ...

Astronomers Seek Super-Size Hubble Successor to Search for Alien Life

Controversy swirls around a bold proposal for a bigger, better—and expensive—replacement for NASA’s premier space telescope -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
Gut Feelings--the "Second Brain" in...

Gut Feelings--the "Second Brain" in Our Gastrointestinal Systems [Excerpt]

There is a superhighway between the brain and GI system that holds great sway over humans -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
Future “Top Guns” Will ...

Future “Top Guns” Will Be Battle Managers Flying Bigger, Slower Aircraft

A report predicts fighter jocks may not need speedy, agile jet fighters because they could rely on long-range sensors, smart missiles and swarms of smart robotic machines to attack from afar -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
Life Ain't Easy: What Would Make an...

Life Ain't Easy: What Would Make an Exoplanet "Earth-Like"? [Excerpt]

Two prominent scientists update our view of the history of life on Earth, featuring the prominent roles of oxygen and carbon dioxide, and question claims that it is fairly easy to initiate... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
Can Assisted Reproduction Save the ...

Can Assisted Reproduction Save the Cheetah? [Slide Show]

The National Zoo is working on ways to make artificial insemination and embryo transfers reliable enough to rebuild genetically stagnant cheetah populations -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

Newscientist

New Urbanist: Our infrastructure is...

New Urbanist: Our infrastructure is expanding to include animals

Animals are vital for the functioning of modern cities, but we need to be morally prepared when we inevitably start engineering them for specific urban tasks
If our planet had a brain, it might...

If our planet had a brain, it might look something like this

The San Fernando marshes in southern Spain is a mass of brain-like folds, populated by communities of algae and bacteria in a giant fractal landscape
Flying in a spaceplane is like a ma...

Flying in a spaceplane is like a magic carpet ride

Virgin Galactic's chief pilot David Mackay on how he's gearing up to take tourists to the edge of space ? and why recent tragedies won't stop him (full text available to subscribers)
The human universe: Could we engine...

The human universe: Could we engineer the galaxy?

We may be masters of architecture here on Earth, but with a couple of leaps in technology, we could tinker with the shape of the cosmos ? and even its fate (full text available to subscribers)
Severe heat costs the Australian ec...

Severe heat costs the Australian economy US$6.2 billion a year

Australians take an average of 4 days off a year due to heat stress – that plus lower productivity on hot days dents economic output by nearly 0.5 per cent
The human universe: Could we coloni...

The human universe: Could we colonise the stars?

If we really are alone in the universe, should we take Earth's life to other planets? Especially as we might already have the means (full text available to subscribers)

NY times.com Science

Tracing the Ebola Outbreak, Scienti...

Tracing the Ebola Outbreak, Scientists Hunt a Silent Epidemic

Researchers mapping the virus?s spread are tracking tiny mutations in its gene sequences across nations to help explain the epidemic.
Ghostly Voices From Thomas Edison?s...

Ghostly Voices From Thomas Edison?s Dolls Can Now Be Heard

New technology allows the nursery rhymes on the talking toys? cylinders, the first entertainment recordings, to be played without being touched.
Books: Review: Paul Offit?s ?Bad Fa...

Books: Review: Paul Offit?s ?Bad Faith? Explores Casualties of Doctrine

Dr. Paul A. Offit writes about the costs of substituting prayer for medical care, especially in the cases of those without a voice ? children.
The Uphill Battle to Better Regulat...

The Uphill Battle to Better Regulate Formaldehyde

E.P.A. rules aim to address dangerous fumes from the chemical, often used in furniture, but industry forces and others see government overreach.
Strategies Funded to Help Boston Ai...

Strategies Funded to Help Boston Airport Guard Against Effects of Climate Change

The plan calls for measures like flood doors and the relocation of generators to higher floors to make the facility better able to withstand higher sea levels and storm surges.
Trying to Stay Ahead of Earthquake ...

Trying to Stay Ahead of Earthquake Disasters

A nonprofit, GeoHazards International, helps developing countries prepare for earthquakes and save lives in places like Kathmandu.

Science Daily

One in five people will develop hea...

One in five people will develop heart failure

One person in five is expected to develop heart failure in developed countries, a disease with no cure but which is largely preventable.
New chip architecture may provide f...

New chip architecture may provide foundation for quantum computer

Quantum computers are in theory capable of simulating the interactions of molecules at a level of detail far beyond the capabilities of even the largest supercomputers today. Such simulations could revolutionize chemistry, biology and material science, but the development of quantum computers has been limited by the ability to increase the number of quantum bits, or qubits, that encode, store and access large amounts of data.
Chest strap heart rate monitor

Chest strap heart rate monitor

Scientists have developed a novel chest strap device for the long-term monitoring of patients with heart and circulatory problems. What is special about the new system is that it records an electrocardiogram (ECG) of the wearer. It is also self-moistening, which is essential for reliable signal monitoring.
Soft robot to shape itself and move...

Soft robot to shape itself and move with own internally generated power

What if a new material would allow for development of a 'soft robot' that could reconfigure its own shape and move using its own internally generated power?
'Microcombing' creates stronger, mo...

'Microcombing' creates stronger, more conductive carbon nanotube films

Researchers have developed an inexpensive technique called 'microcombing' to align carbon nanotubes (CNTs), which can be used to create large, pure CNT films that are stronger than any previous such films. The technique also improves the electrical conductivity that makes these films attractive for use in electronic and aerospace applications.
What happens when populations hit t...

What happens when populations hit the borders of expansion?

Scientists are researching how population size and genetic drift affect the limits to a species' range. In a new article, they explain why sharp range margins arise in natural populations.

Eureka Alert

Online training can teach psychothe...

Online training can teach psychotherapists evidence-based treatments, study finds

(RAND Corporation) Psychotherapy treatments can lag years behind what research has shown to be effective because there simply are not enough clinicians trained in new methods. A new study proposes one solution to the problem. The findings show that employing online training programs to teach psychotherapists how to use newer evidence-based treatments can be as successful as in-person instruction.
Historic AAAS Kavli competition exp...

Historic AAAS Kavli competition expands to honor excellence in science journalism worldwide

(American Association for the Advancement of Science) The American Association for the Advancement of Science today announced a global expansion of its historic science journalism awards program, thanks to an additional generous endowment from the Kavli Foundation.
Chest strap heart rate monitor

Chest strap heart rate monitor

(Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology (EMPA)) A team of Empa scientists has, together with industrial partners, developed a novel chest strap device for the long-term monitoring of patients with heart and circulatory problems. What is special about the new system is that it records an electrocardiogram of the wearer. It is also self-moistening, which is essential for reliable signal monitoring. At the specialist exhibition, Techtextil, held recently in Frankfurt am Main, Germany, the system won the Techtextil Innovation Award 2015.
A neural network model predicts whe...

A neural network model predicts whether a bank can go bust

(FECYT - Spanish Foundation for Science and Technology) The learning mechanism of neurones has inspired researchers at the University of Valladolid, Spain to create algorithms that can predict whether a bank will go bust. The model was correct for 96 percent of the banks that went bust in the USA in 2013 after analyzing their financial indicators from the previous decade, marked by the economic crisis. The most vulnerable were those which had accumulated loans from the construction sector and grown rapidly without sufficient provisions.
America's best teachers get creativ...

America's best teachers get creative

(Michigan State University) America's best teachers rap their algebra lessons, use music to teach Kafka and find other ways to use their own creative interests to teach their students, finds a new study by Michigan State University scholars.
Nonstop shopping

Nonstop shopping

(Journal of Retailing at New York University) Customers who adopted mobile technology for their grocery shopping shopped more often and placed larger orders.

Forteantimes

Thur 20 Nov - Daily round-up of the...

Thur 20 Nov - Daily round-up of the world's weird news

Young boy claimed to be reincarnated Marine, four armed baby named God Boy by parents, Bumfight punk body part theft
Mon 17 Nov - Daily round-up of the ...

Mon 17 Nov - Daily round-up of the world's weird news

Philly Jesus goes ice skating, gets arrested, plus: human flesh pastry makers, Swastika bauble outrage and a pair of resurrections
Mon 10 Nov - Daily round-up of the ...

Mon 10 Nov - Daily round-up of the world's weird news

Quadruple amputee is armed and on the run; Man buys home, finds corpse inside; dowsers discover mass grave in Tunbridge Wells
Wed 29 Oct - Daily round-up of the ...

Wed 29 Oct - Daily round-up of the world's weird news

London museum planned to shoot and steal Nessie, Iceland offers Minge Pies for Christmas, plus a ghost in the bathtub
Mon 27 Oct - Daily round-up of the ...

Mon 27 Oct - Daily round-up of the world's weird news

Literary argument ends in death, tiger sex spoof video nightmare, man calls suicide hotline and is shot dead by SWAT team
Thur 23 Oct - Daily round-up of the...

Thur 23 Oct - Daily round-up of the world's weird news

Sex toy clown attack, Hitler coffee creamer PR disaster, man fights off bear with old computer, return of the Swedish mystery subs

Howstuffworks

The Most Embarrassing Moments in th...

The Most Embarrassing Moments in the History of Science

What? Scientists get things wrong? We know. It?s shocking to hear, but science isn?t always an exact science. Mistakes do happen -- and they often lead to great scientific discoveries. So, grab your safety glasses and see if you can identify the most embarrassing scientific moments ever.
10 Completely False ?Facts? Everyon...

10 Completely False ?Facts? Everyone Knows

The blood in your veins is blue. Glass is a slow-moving liquid. If you touch a baby bird, its mother will abandon it. Not so fast ?- if you learned any of those "facts" in school, what you learned was wrong.
Flight Pictures

Flight Pictures

Flight pictures show photos from aviation history. Take a look at pictures of the most important aircraft in history.
How the Electoral College Works

How the Electoral College Works

The Electoral College is not an Ivy League school. Rather, it's a process for selecting the next U.S. president that actually carries more weight than the popular vote. Why is it there and should it be continued?
What is a Nor'easter?

What is a Nor'easter?

Nor'easters typically affect the east coast of the United States during the winter season. What exactly are Nor'easters, though, and how do they form. Find out the answer to this question in this article from HowStuffWorks.

Unexplained-mysteries

Nazca Lines formed ancient pilgrima...

Nazca Lines formed ancient pilgrimage route

The famous geoglyphs in Peru may have been created by at least two different groups of people. Situated on a remote arid plateau in southern Peru, the...
Has Britain's Roswell finally been ...

Has Britain's Roswell finally been solved ?

Author David Clarke believes he has found the answer to one of Britain's most enduring UFO mysteries. In 1962 Donald McKenzie, a shepherd who had been...
'Pillars of Creation' unveiled in f...

'Pillars of Creation' unveiled in full 3D

The breathtaking cosmic spectacle has been revealed for the first time in three dimensions. First snapped by the Hubble Space Telescope in 1995, the '...
Fans worldwide celebrate 'Star Wars...

Fans worldwide celebrate 'Star Wars Day'

A celebration of all things Star Wars has been kickstarted by cries of 'May the Fourth be with you'. It's an event that has become something of a trad...
Prehistoric insect found trapped in...

Prehistoric insect found trapped in amber

A 100 million-year-old predatory cockroach has been found perfectly preserved in a piece of amber. The movie 'Jurassic Park' explored the idea of obta...
Multiple UFOs filmed over the Phili...

Multiple UFOs filmed over the Philippines

A number of high-profile UFO sightings have been making headline news in the Central Luzon region. Described as 'dancing lights', the aerial anomalies...

Sciencenewsforkids.org

Cosmic rays offer clues about light...

Cosmic rays offer clues about lightning

Space particles called cosmic rays pelt Earth. Scientists are using the rain of these particles to probe how lightning forms.
Injected nanoparticles treat intern...

Injected nanoparticles treat internal wounds

Soldiers wounded in a bombing could be treated with a shot of specially designed nanoparticles that stop bleeding and inflammation in the lungs.
Ritual cannibalism occurred in Ston...

Ritual cannibalism occurred in Stone Age England

Stone Age human bones from a cave in England show signs of cannibalism. The people had been eaten during burial rituals nearly 15,000 years ago, experts say.
Explainer: What are lidar, radar an...

Explainer: What are lidar, radar and sonar?

Radar, sonar and lidar and are three similar technologies. Each relies on the echoing of waves ? radio, sound or light waves ? to detect objects.
Laser vision reveals hidden worlds

Laser vision reveals hidden worlds

From discovering ancient ruins to forecasting climate change, the laser mapping technology called lidar is changing many fields of science.
QUESTIONS for Laser Vision Reveals...

QUESTIONS for Laser Vision Reveals Hidden Worlds

Questions for Laser Vision Reveals Hidden Worlds

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