Discovery

Could Clay Help Attack Superbugs?

Could Clay Help Attack Superbugs?

The ancient remedy could provide a new weapon against microbes Continue reading ?
DNews: The Dreaded Turbulence: What...

DNews: The Dreaded Turbulence: What Makes Flights Bumpy

Most of us probably breathe a sigh of relief when the captain promises "a smooth ride" to wherever we're flying. But, as DNews explains, turbulence is really no big deal.
Why Antarctic Sea Ice Isn't Shrinki...

Why Antarctic Sea Ice Isn't Shrinking

Winds, currents and seafloor features may be responsible for keeping Antarctica's sea ice intact.
Why Is India's Heat Wave Off the Ch...

Why Is India's Heat Wave Off the Chart?

An oppressive heat wave in India led to a record temperature of 123.8 degrees Fahrenheit -- the highest ever in Asia.
Live on a Farm by the Sea for Just ...

Live on a Farm by the Sea for Just $1.50

A four-bedroom bungalow and 416 sheep are all covered by the annual rent. Scenic views available at no additional cost. Continue reading ?
US: 1 in 8 Swimming Pools Closed fo...

US: 1 in 8 Swimming Pools Closed for Health Violations

One in eight swimming pools in five populous states are closed upon inspection due to dirty and potentially dangerous water, the CDC reported this week. Continue reading ?

Yahoo Science

90-minute British DnaNudge COVID-19...

90-minute British DnaNudge COVID-19 test is accurate, Lancet study finds

90-minute British DnaNudge COVID-19 test is accurate, Lancet study findsA British COVID-19 test known as DnaNudge that gives results in just over an hour and which requires no laboratory was accurate in almost all cases, an academic review in the Lancet has found. Faster testing could allow more people to return to work or permit testing on entry to hospital, thus slowing a second spike in coronavirus infections. The new test, based on the design of a DNA test developed by a professor at Imperial College London, received approval for clinical use by the Medicines and Healthcare Products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) at the end of April after successful trials.


90-minute British DnaNudge COVID-19...

90-minute British DnaNudge COVID-19 test is accurate, Lancet study finds

90-minute British DnaNudge COVID-19 test is accurate, Lancet study findsA British COVID-19 test known as DnaNudge that gives results in just over an hour and which requires no laboratory was accurate in almost all cases, an academic review in the Lancet has found. Faster testing could allow more people to return to work or permit testing on entry to hospital, thus slowing a second spike in coronavirus infections. The new test, based on the design of a DNA test developed by a professor at Imperial College London, received approval for clinical use by the Medicines and Healthcare Products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) at the end of April after successful trials.


Alligator on gas snaps up Ig Nobel ...

Alligator on gas snaps up Ig Nobel prize

Alligator on gas snaps up Ig Nobel prizeThe 2020 Ig Nobel prizes honour crocodilian vocalisations, narcissistic eyebrows and vibrating worms.


'Total failure' on English ...

'Total failure' on English river water quality

'Total failure' on English river water qualityPollutants still blight all of England's rivers, lakes and streams, the Environment Agency says.


Forget vitamins: Fauci says the 3 b...

Forget vitamins: Fauci says the 3 best things 'to keep your immune system working optimally' cost nothing

Forget vitamins: Fauci says the 3 best things 'to keep your immune system working optimally' cost nothing"If you really want to keep your immune system working optimally, there are things that you do that are normal things," Fauci said.


Hurricane Sally's Fierce Rain S...

Hurricane Sally's Fierce Rain Shows How Climate Change Raises Storm Risks

Hurricane Sally's Fierce Rain Shows How Climate Change Raises Storm RisksAs hurricanes go, Sally was not especially powerful. Rated a Category 2 storm when it struck the Gulf Coast on Wednesday, it was soon downgraded. But climate change likely made it more dangerous by slowing it down and feeding it more moisture, setting it up to pummel the region with wind and catastrophic rainfall.Sally was crawling at about 3 mph when its eye made landfall early Wednesday near Gulf Shores, Alabama, and was "inching its way inland" later in the day, the National Hurricane Center said. The slow movement, or stalling, of the storm led to staggering rain totals, with more than two feet in some areas by midmorning Wednesday and widespread flooding."When a storm moves slower, it lingers longer over the same location," said Kimberly Wood, a geoscientist at Mississippi State University. "A rain rate of, say, an inch an hour -- that's not so bad if the rain only lasts 30 minutes. But if it lasts for half a day, that adds up quickly."Sally was not an isolated example of a stalling hurricane. "There is increasing evidence that storms are slowing down," Wood said.That evidence comes in part from a 2018 study that showed that hurricanes near the Gulf and Atlantic coasts were increasingly likely to stall. The study also found a clear signal of more local rainfall, said one of the authors, James P. Kossin, a researcher with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. "And it was associated with increasing frequency of stalled systems," he said.Climate change has also led to wetter storms, Wood said, because warmer air holds more moisture. Between the slowing speeds and increasing moisture, with storms like Sally "there's a combination effect," she said.Researchers increasingly see a link between stalling of hurricanes and climate change. Rapid warming in the Arctic has reduced the difference in temperature between that region and the tropics, leading to a weakening and slowing of the jet stream and related winds that drive hurricanes' forward movement.Hurricanes also sometimes meander, Kossin said. Hurricane Harvey, which inundated Houston in 2017, moved back and forth over the area, increasing the deluge. Sally was heading due west, parallel to the coast, on Monday when it made a sudden right-angle turn to the north early Tuesday.Such movements may also be linked to slowing atmospheric circulation, Kossin said. "You won't really get meandering until you get a slow storm," he said. "They don't go zipping around like go-karts."While Sally's winds were not as intense as the strongest hurricanes -- maximum sustained speeds early Wednesday were about 105 mph, about half the speed of a Category 5 storm's -- by lingering for longer, the storm may also have increased storm surge, the wind-driven buildup of water that can quickly flood coastal areas, often with devastating results.But storm surge can be influenced by many other factors, including the timing of tides and the shallowness of a bay or another body of water. In this case, Sally's slow speed "contributed more to the extreme rainfall flooding than to the surge flooding," said Rick Luettich, a professor at the University of North Carolina and a principal developer of the leading surge model used by forecasters.Luettich said the storm's surge was close to projections of about five feet. But another characteristic of some hurricanes that is linked to warmer oceans, the rapid strengthening of a storm before landfall, "gave the water a bigger push" than earlier forecasts called for, he said.Hurricanes are not the only kind of storms affected by climate change, and not the only kind that can bring catastrophic flooding to the Gulf Coast or other regions. Record rain from a low-pressure system in August 2016, a large storm but one that did not rotate like a hurricane, led to floods in Baton Rouge. A gauge east of the city received 26.5 inches of rain in three days.That storm prompted an attribution study, research that tries to determine the extent, if any, of climate change's influence on an extreme weather event. It found that climate change had increased the likelihood of such a storm along the Gulf Coast in any given year by 40% since 1900. In the current climate, there is a 3% chance in any given year of a similar storm."The risk of extreme precipitation events in this region has gone up," said Sarah Kapnick, a researcher at NOAA's Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory in Princeton, New Jersey, who worked on the study."There's a basic theoretical understanding underlying all of this," Kapnick said. With warming "you get more water vapor in the sky.""So when you get these storms, be they hurricanes or summer storms, they have the potential to hold more water in them," she added. "And that water has to go somewhere."This article originally appeared in The New York Times.(C) 2020 The New York Times Company


Physorg.com

Poop knives, arachnophobic entomolo...

Poop knives, arachnophobic entomologists win 2020 Ig Nobels

Maybe this year's Ig Nobels, the spoof prizes for dubious but humorous scientific achievement, should have been renamed the Ick Nobels.
Study suggests substantial proporti...

Study suggests substantial proportion of pet cats and dogs are infected with SARS-CoV-2 by their owners

A small study by Canadian veterinary science experts being presented at this ESCMID Conference on Coronavirus Disease (ECCVID, held online from 23-25 September) suggests that a substantial proportion of pet cats and dogs can be infected by SARS-CoV-2 by their owners. Furthermore, in several cases pets found to be infected had COVID-19-like respiratory symptoms at the time their owner had COVID-19.
NASA finds tropical storm Noul pack...

NASA finds tropical storm Noul packing a punch

Powerful storms with heavy rainmaking capabilities appeared over the coast of central Vietnam in NASA provided infrared imagery on Sept. 17.
Polarization over energy and climat...

Polarization over energy and climate in Canada

Positive Energy today released new survey results examining Canadians' views on the role of oil and gas in Canada's current and future economy, and the respective roles of federal and provincial governments in the country's energy and climate future. This novel survey explores how party affiliation, ideology, region, gender, and age may influence opinions on these topics. The survey, conducted by Positive Energy researchers Stephen Bird and Erick Lachapelle prior to the onset of COVID-19, provides a valuable benchmark for Canadians' views on oil, gas and government leadership.
Race to rescue animals as Brazilian...

Race to rescue animals as Brazilian wetlands burn

Wildlife guide Eduarda Fernandes steers a speedboat up the Piquiri river in western Brazil, scanning the horizon for jaguars wounded in the wildfires ripping through the Pantanal, the world's biggest tropical wetlands.
'Cellular compass' guides stem cell...

'Cellular compass' guides stem cell division in plants

The stem cells tasked with creating and maintaining biological tissues have a difficult job. They have to precisely divide to form new specialized cells, which are destined to different fates even though they contain identical DNA. An obvious question then is: How do the cells divide in all the right ways to produce a healthy tissue? This was the grand motivating question for Andrew Muroyama, a postdoctoral scholar in the lab of Stanford University biologist Dominique Bergmann, as he monitored days of leaf development in the flowering plant Arabidopsis thaliana. There, amongst a thousand cells under his microscope, he noticed that the nucleus?the DNA-containing control center in the cell?moved in unexpected and strangely purposeful ways as stem cells divided.

PBS

An Indigenous bioethicist on CRISPR...

An Indigenous bioethicist on CRISPR and decolonizing DNA

Gene-editing technology is progressing faster than our ethical conversations about how we should use it. Krystal Tsosie thinks that?s a problem.
Chadwick Boseman and the rise of co...

Chadwick Boseman and the rise of colon cancer in young adults

Colorectal cancer is the second-leading cause of cancer deaths in the United States. Boseman?s case illustrates the importance of more screening?and addressing systemic inequities in health care.
Inside the derecho that pummeled th...

Inside the derecho that pummeled the Midwest

On August 10, a weather complex known as a ?derecho? sent intense winds and thunderstorms over a 700-mile stretch from Nebraska to Indiana. Now, Iowa works to recover from its damage.
Dwarf planet Ceres has salty water ...

Dwarf planet Ceres has salty water and appears geologically active

High-resolution images from NASA?s Dawn Orbiter suggest our solar system?s largest asteroid may have an ancient underground ocean, but some scientists are skeptical.
The 2020 Perseid meteor shower peak...

The 2020 Perseid meteor shower peaks tonight

Here?s how to watch and what you?ll see.
Explore At-Home Agriculture with NO...

Explore At-Home Agriculture with NOVA Education

Join NOVA Education for our "Backyard Farm to Table" virtual field trip series about at-home agriculture.

Scientific American

Can an Algorithm Help Solve Politic...

Can an Algorithm Help Solve Political Paralysis?

As faith in government hits historic lows, organizers in the U.K. are trying a new math-based approach to democracy. Would it work in the bitterly divided U.S?

-- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
Earthquake Sounds Could Reveal How ...

Earthquake Sounds Could Reveal How Quickly the Ocean Is Warming

A new way of measuring the temperature of the seas could fill in gaps left by limited direct monitoring

-- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
Population Density Does Not Doom Ci...

Population Density Does Not Doom Cities to Pandemic Dangers

Crowding, connections among communities and other factors seem to better explain infection and mortality rates

-- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
Global Biodiversity Is in Free Fall

Global Biodiversity Is in Free Fall

A U.N. report reveals that countries worldwide have failed to meet key conservation targets set for 2020

-- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
How New Mexico Controlled the Sprea...

How New Mexico Controlled the Spread of COVID-19

The state went after the disease with widespread testing and science-based targets. Now it is in better shape than its neighbors

-- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
Venus Might Host Life, New Discover...

Venus Might Host Life, New Discovery Suggests

The unexpected atmospheric detection of phosphine, a smelly gas made by microbes on Earth, could spark a revolution in astrobiology

-- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

Newscientist

Supercool experiment reveals water ...

Supercool experiment reveals water is actually two liquids in one

Supercooling liquid water to temperatures lower than ever achieved before has revealed new evidence that water is two liquids in one
Covid-19 news: New cases in England...

Covid-19 news: New cases in England up 167% since end of August

The latest coronavirus news updated every day including coronavirus cases, the latest news, features and interviews from New Scientist and essential information about the covid-19 pandemic
Training bees to prefer certain flo...

Training bees to prefer certain flower scents boosts seed production

Feeding honeybees scented food makes them more likely to visit flowers with that scent, boosting pollination rates and crop yields
Your shoes could be increasing the ...

Your shoes could be increasing the risk of a painful foot condition

Shoes that raise the toes away from the ground make walking easier but weaken the foot, which might increase the risk of a painful condition called plantar fasciitis
Sound analysis hints sirens have an...

Sound analysis hints sirens have an evolutionary link with wolf howls

Wolf howls may have served as a danger signal to our ancestors ? and modern emergency sirens may be an effective way to alert us because they sound like howls
Watch titan triggerfish jump out of...

Watch titan triggerfish jump out of the water to catch and eat crabs

Titan triggerfish that live in the Red Sea will deliberately launch themselves onto the beach to catch and eat ghost crabs crawling along the shore

NY times.com Science

A New Ship?s Mission: Let the Deep ...

A New Ship?s Mission: Let the Deep Sea Be Seen

A giant new vessel, OceanXplorer, seeks to unveil the secrets of the abyss for a global audience.
The Vikings Were More Complicated T...

The Vikings Were More Complicated Than You Might Think

One of the biggest surveys ever of ancient DNA offers new evidence of who the Vikings were and where they went raiding and trading.
Australia's Stinging Trees: Please ...

Australia's Stinging Trees: Please Do Not Pet Them

Scientists have found a potent chemical that might give Australian giant stinging trees their extraordinarily painful punch.
That Mushroom Motorcycle Jacket Wil...

That Mushroom Motorcycle Jacket Will Never Go Out of Style

Leather goods made of fungi are versatile and sustainable, a new study finds.
Meet a Bee With a Very Big Brain

Meet a Bee With a Very Big Brain

New research suggests there is a relationship between the diversity of a bee?s diet and the size of its croissant-shaped brain.
A Solar Forecast With Good News for...

A Solar Forecast With Good News for Civilization as We Know It

Space weather experts believe the sun has entered a new sunspot cycle, and expect it to be a relatively quiet one.

Science Daily

Ecologists sound alarm on plastic p...

Ecologists sound alarm on plastic pollution

Ecologists examining plastic pollution entering oceans, rivers and lakes around the world annually, outline potential impacts of various mitigation strategies over the coming decade. The researchers estimate the scale of human response needed to reduce future emissions and manage what's already floating around out there and recommend a fundamental shift to a framework based on recycling where end-of-life plastic products are valued rather than becoming waste.
A scientific first: How psychedelic...

A scientific first: How psychedelics bind to key brain cell receptor

For the first time, scientists solved the high-resolution structure of these compounds when they are actively bound to the 5-HT2A serotonin receptor on the surface of brain cells. This discovery is already leading to the exploration of more precise compounds that could eliminate hallucinations but still have strong therapeutic effects. Psilocybin - the psychedelic compound in mushrooms - has already been granted breakthrough status by the FDA to treat depression.
Scientists discover what happens in...

Scientists discover what happens in our brains when we make educated guesses

Researchers have identified how cells in our brains work together to join up memories of separate experiences, allowing us to make educated guesses in everyday life. By studying both human and mouse brain activity, they report that this process happens in a region of the brain called the hippocampus.
Curve at tip of shoes eases movemen...

Curve at tip of shoes eases movement but may lead to weaker muscles, problems

The scientists found that the more curved a toe spring is, the less power the foot inside the shoe has to exert when pushing off from the ground while walking. That means foot muscles are doing less work, and this, the researchers hypothesize, may have consequences such as less endurance and make people more susceptible to medical conditions like plantar fasciitis.
Hubble captures crisp new portrait ...

Hubble captures crisp new portrait of Jupiter's storms

Hubble's sharp view is giving researchers an updated weather report on the monster planet's turbulent atmosphere, including a remarkable new storm brewing, and a cousin of the famous Great Red Spot region gearing up to change color -- again.
Curbing land clearing for food prod...

Curbing land clearing for food production is vital to reverse biodiversity declines

Preserving terrestrial biodiversity requires more ambitious land-conservation targets to be established and met. At the same time, 'bending the curve' on biodiversity loss needs more efficient food production, and healthier and less wasteful consumption and trade. If undertaken with 'unprecedented ambition and coordination,' these efforts provide an opportunity to reverse terrestrial biodiversity loss by 2050.

Eureka Alert

Private health insurers paid hospit...

Private health insurers paid hospitals 247% of what medicare would

(RAND Corporation) While recent hospital price transparency initiatives have increased information about procedure-level prices available to patients, employers who pay for most private insurance have little usable information about the prices negotiated on their behalf. A new study based on data from more than half the nation's hospitals finds that prices paid to hospitals nationally during 2018 by privately insured patients averaged 247% of what Medicare would have paid, with wide variation in prices among states.
MDI Biological Laboratory receives ...

MDI Biological Laboratory receives grant to study tendon regeneration

(Mount Desert Island Biological Laboratory) Prayag Murawala, Ph.D., of the MDI Biological Laboratory has received a $332,000 grant to study tendon injury. He is seeking to determine if the same cellular and molecular mechanisms responsible for regenerating tendons during limb regeneration in salamanders also come into play during tendon regeneration after injury. The knowledge gained could one day be used to develop therapies to trigger tendon regeneration in adult humans, who for the most part are incapable of regeneration.
Rapid blood test could detect brain...

Rapid blood test could detect brain injury in minutes, study shows

(University of Pittsburgh) A blood protein test could detect the severity of head trauma in under 15 minutes, according to a recent study.
OHSU-VA research suggests strategie...

OHSU-VA research suggests strategies to reduce missed appointments

(Oregon Health & Science University) New research from Oregon Health & Science University and the VA Portland Health Care System suggests that a little finesse and a thoughtful approach could go a long way toward reducing a vexing problem in the health care system: missed appointments.
Four education researchers lay out ...

Four education researchers lay out best practices for higher ed distance learning

(SAGE) SAGE Publishing and Corwin today announce the release of The Distance Learning Playbook for College and University Instruction. Co-authored by four leading education experts, the evidence-based guide addresses faculty-student relationships at a distance, professor self-care, creating engaging digital tasks, feedback and assessment, and more. The title includes video footage and downloadable exercises, featuring the guidance of over 20 educators from a diverse range of disciplines.
Study shows quizzes improve academi...

Study shows quizzes improve academic performance

(Iowa State University) Students who are quizzed over class material at least once a week tend to perform better on midterm and final exams compared to students who did not take quizzes, according to a new Iowa State University meta-analysis. The researchers found in addition to frequency, immediate feedback from instructors also seemed to positively impact student performance.

Forteantimes

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Howstuffworks

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Unexplained-mysteries

Man uses live snake as face mask on...

Man uses live snake as face mask on UK bus

Commuters couldn't believe their eyes this week when a man wearing a large snake got onto the bus. In what must surely be the most bizarre response to...
Two 'ghosts' caught on camera at Ge...

Two 'ghosts' caught on camera at Gettysburg

Footage has emerged that allegedly shows two ghostly figures at the site of the Battle of Gettysburg. If there's one place in the United States that h...
Did a solar flare cause the Titanic...

Did a solar flare cause the Titanic disaster ?

It is now believed that a geomagnetic storm interfered with the Titanic's navigation and communications. Situated 13,000ft beneath the surface of the ...
Prehistoric sperm found trapped ins...

Prehistoric sperm found trapped inside amber

Scientists have identified 100 million-year-old sperm cells perfectly preserved within fossilized tree resin. The cells, which are several times the s...
Blimp over New Jersey sparks UFO hy...

Blimp over New Jersey sparks UFO hysteria

Hundreds took to social media on Monday night after a strange object appeared in the skies over New Jersey. Appearing as a slow moving cigar-shaped ob...
Japanese military instructed on UFO...

Japanese military instructed on UFO response

Japanese Defense Minister Taro Kono has instructed the country's military on how to respond to a UFO incident. Two years ago, the Japanese government ...

Sciencenewsforkids.org

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PopSci

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Science News.org

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