Discovery

Why Do Thunderstorms Give Off Super...

Why Do Thunderstorms Give Off Super-Intense Gamma Rays?

Brief bursts of intense energy occur inside thunderstorms 1,000 times a day around the world, new research shows. Continue reading ?
NASA Satellite Sends Back Most Deta...

NASA Satellite Sends Back Most Detailed CO2 View

Fresh data from NASA reveals a comprehensive global view of CO2 in full color.
Robot Captures Views of Hidden Arct...

Robot Captures Views of Hidden Arctic Ecosystem

A remote-controlled underwater robot explores the underside of stable Arctic sea ice, collecting the most detailed information yet of this largely unexplored environment.
New York State Bans Fracking

New York State Bans Fracking

Gov. Andrew Cuomo said he would ban hydraulic fracking in New York State, citing health concerns about the controversial oil and gas drilling technique.
DNews: Volcanoes Can Show Us How Ea...

DNews: Volcanoes Can Show Us How Earth Resurfaces Itself

Volcanoes can wreak havoc with our lives and even take them without warning, but to geologists keen observing how Earth regenerates its crust, they can be as educational as they are scary.
Strange Rock from Russia Contains 3...

Strange Rock from Russia Contains 30,000 Diamonds

Here's the perfect Christmas gift for the person who has everything: A red and green rock, ornament-sized, stuffed with 30,000 teeny-tiny diamonds.

Yahoo Science

Disgraced Japan researcher fails to...

Disgraced Japan researcher fails to replicate 'game changing' stem cell results

Haruko Obokata, a researcher at semi-governmental research institute RIKEN, lowers her eyes during a news conference in OsakaBy Elaine Lies TOKYO (Reuters) - A disgraced Japanese researcher has failed to replicate results hailed as a potential breakthrough in stem-cell treatment and efforts to do so will be abandoned, officials at her research institute said on Friday. The scandal involving the research, which detailed simple ways to reprogram mature cells back to an embryonic-like state, eventually led to the retraction of papers published in the influential journal Nature and tarnished the reputation of Japanese scientific research. ...

Europe recommends approval for firs...

Europe recommends approval for first stem-cell therapy

LONDON (Reuters) - European regulators have recommended approval of the first medicine containing stem cells to treat a rare condition caused by burns to the eye. The European Medicines Agency said on Friday that Holoclar, from privately held Italian company Chiesi, had been given a green light for moderate to severe limbal stem cell deficiency due to physical or chemical burns. Left untreated, the condition can result in blindness. Holoclar is a living tissue product made from a biopsy taken from a small undamaged area of the patient?s cornea and grown in the laboratory using cell culture. ...
SpaceX delays planned cargo run to ...

SpaceX delays planned cargo run to space station to early January

Falcon 9 rocket is launched by Space Exploration Technologies on its fourth cargo resupply service mission to the International Space Station, from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in FloridaCAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. (Reuters) - Space Exploration Technologies is delaying the planned launch on Friday of an unmanned Falcon 9 rocket, which will carry a cargo ship to the International Space Station for NASA, to early January, officials said on Thursday. Liftoff from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida had been planned for 1:22 p.m. EST, but an undisclosed technical issue with the rocket prompted SpaceX, as the company is known, to postpone the flight until Jan 6. The problem surfaced during routine prelaunch test firing of the rocket?s engines, SpaceX spokesman John Taylor said. ...

Songbirds fly coop long before torn...

Songbirds fly coop long before tornadoes arrive in Tennessee

Henry Streby holds a male golden-winged warbler and the geolocator that the bird carried in the Cumberland Mountains of TennesseeBy Will Dunham WASHINGTON (Reuters) - You might want to be careful about who you call a birdbrain. Some of our feathered friends exhibit powers of perception that put humans to shame. Scientists said on Thursday that little songbirds known as golden-winged warblers fled their nesting grounds in Tennessee up to two days before the arrival of a fierce storm system that unleashed 84 tornadoes in southern U.S. states in April. The researchers said the birds were apparently alerted to the danger by sounds at frequencies below the range of human hearing. ...

India tests its heaviest space laun...

India tests its heaviest space launch vehicle, eyes global market

By Aditya Kalra NEW DELHI (Reuters) - India's space agency successfully tested on Thursday its most powerful satellite launch vehicle that can put heavier payloads into space, and, it hopes, win India a bigger slice of the $300 billion global space industry. The Indian Space Research Organization (ISRO) also checked the working of an unmanned crew module on the vehicle, which could give the agency the option of manned missions. ...
Keeping Up with the Greens: Neighbo...

Keeping Up with the Greens: Neighbors Can Spur Conservation (Op-Ed)

Keeping Up with the Greens: Neighbors Can Spur Conservation (Op-Ed)Marlene Cimons writes for Climate Nexus, a nonprofit that aims to tell the climate story in innovative ways that raise awareness of, dispel misinformation about and showcase solutions to climate change and energy issues in the United States. She contributed this article to Live Science's Expert Voices: Op-Ed & Insights. Mindful of the growing dangers of climate change, I always strive to be an environmentally conscientious consumer. So, understandably, I was more than a little upset to learn that I was a flop at energy savings compared to my neighbors. This revelation came through a series of home energy reports from the utility company that services my weekend house 170 miles away in western Maryland.

Physorg.com

Efforts to save rare northern white...

Efforts to save rare northern white rhino continue

Experts will meet in Kenya next month to discuss ways to save the critically endangered northern white rhinos from extinction.
Scientists make strides in tsunami ...

Scientists make strides in tsunami warning since 2004

The 2004 tsunami led to greater global cooperation and improved techniques for detecting waves that could reach faraway shores, even though scientists still cannot predict when an earthquake will strike.
Clooney slams skittish Hollywood af...

Clooney slams skittish Hollywood after Sony hack

Film star George Clooney slammed the Hollywood movie industry for failing to stand up against the cyber threats that prompted Sony Pictures to cancel release of the movie "The Interview."
Security flaws allow global cellula...

Security flaws allow global cellular eavesdropping

Security flaws in a system used by telecoms companies to manage cross-border cellular connections could open the door to wide-ranging surveillance of mobile phone traffic.
Trade winds ventilate the tropical ...

Trade winds ventilate the tropical oceans

Long-term observations indicate that the oxygen minimum zones in the tropical oceans have expanded in recent decades. The reason is still unknown. Now scientists at the GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel and the Collaborative Research Centre 754 "Climate ? Biogeochemical Interactions in the Tropical Ocean" have found an explanation with the help of model simulations: a natural fluctuation of the trade winds. The study has been published in the international journal Geophysical Research Letters.
Hermit creepy crawlies: Two new tax...

Hermit creepy crawlies: Two new taxa of wood-feeding cockroach from China

Scientists from the Southwest University, Chongqing, China have found a new species and a new subspecies of cockroach. What makes these creepy crawlies distinctive from the cockroaches most of us know is that they don't infest human houses, on the contrary they prefer to live a hermit life drilling logs, hidden away from human eyes. The study was published in the open access journal ZooKeys.

PBS

Spinosaurus vs. Alligator

Spinosaurus vs. Alligator

A tame alligator named Bubba betrays the secrets of the largest predator that ever lived.
Killer Landslides

Killer Landslides

Explore the forces behind deadly landslides?and the danger zones for the next big one.
Zombies and Calculus

Zombies and Calculus

The zombie apocalypse is here, and calculus explains why we can't quite finish them off.
Zombies and Calculus, Part 2

Zombies and Calculus, Part 2

You're being chased by zombies, and understanding tangent vectors may save your life.
Bigger Than T. rex

Bigger Than T. rex

Meet ?the lost killer of the Cretaceous and the world's largest predator ever.
Emperor's Ghost Army

Emperor's Ghost Army

Explore the buried clay warriors, chariots, and bronze weapons of China's first emperor.

Scientific American

Monkey See, Monkey Speak

Monkey See, Monkey Speak

Scientists use language and logic to translate monkey sounds into English and develop linguistic rules for primate dialects. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
The Dark Corners of Our DNA Hold Cl...

The Dark Corners of Our DNA Hold Clues about Disease

A “deep-learning” algorithm shines a light on mutations in once obscure areas of the genome -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
For Sale: ?Your Name Here? in a Pre...

For Sale: ?Your Name Here? in a Prestigious Science Journal

An investigation into some scientific papers finds worrying irregularities -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
A Faster Way to Diagnose Antibiotic...

A Faster Way to Diagnose Antibiotic Resistance

Novel test could slash wait time and curb inappropriate prescriptions -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
How Congress Snuck Changes to U.S. ...

How Congress Snuck Changes to U.S. Environmental Policy into the New Budget Bill

The $1-trillion bill keeps agencies from acting on clean air and water and energy -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
Architects Aim to Make Us Healthier...

Architects Aim to Make Us Healthier with "Irresistible Staircases" and Open Layouts

To build better and healthier spaces, architects are heeding evidence-based lessons  -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

Newscientist

Acid bath stem-cell scientist can't...

Acid bath stem-cell scientist can't reproduce results

Haruko Obokata, at the Riken Institute in Kobe, Japan, admitted she could not reproduce evidence of the existence of STAP cells after an eight month investigation
Europe set to allow individual nati...

Europe set to allow individual nations to ban GM crops

Proposed new rules would let member states of the European Union ban genetically modified crops on their soil even if the EU has approved the crops
Feedback: A gramophone news service

Feedback: A gramophone news service

Prefiguration in Budapest, call us on the Telephonoscope, the round globe is a vast head and more (full text available to subscribers)
Europa's geysers disappear in a clo...

Europa's geysers disappear in a cloud of mystery

Plumes of water from Jupiter's moon Europa have not reappeared since their discovery ? and evidence now suggests they may not have existed to begin with
Weird sea ghost breaks record for d...

Weird sea ghost breaks record for deepest living fish

A newly discovered species with a bizarre body has been spotted deeper down than any other living fish
How to think about? Alien contact

How to think about? Alien contact

First, try not to think about what alien life might be like. Then wonder whether we have any chance of finding it (full text available to subscribers)

NY times.com Science

Liberia Will Proceed With Senate Vo...

Liberia Will Proceed With Senate Vote Delayed by Ebola

An election repeatedly delayed because of the epidemic and other challenges will be held on Saturday, but critics worry whether voting will fair and safe.
Kepler Spacecraft Finds New ?Super-...

Kepler Spacecraft Finds New ?Super-Earth? 180 Light-Years Away

The planet, about two and a half times the size of Earth, is in a category of planets called super-Earths that do not exist in our solar system.
Owners of Chemical Firm Charged in ...

Owners of Chemical Firm Charged in Elk River Spill in West Virginia

Four owners and operators of Freedom Industries were indicted in the January leak that cut off drinking water to hundreds of thousands of residents.
Matter: The Strange Tale of a New S...

Matter: The Strange Tale of a New Species of Lizard

Aspidoscelis neavesi was produced in the lab by mating two other species, and its creation defies conventional ideas about how new species evolve.
Dot Earth Blog: A Chat on New York?...

Dot Earth Blog: A Chat on New York?s Shale Gas Ban with Anti-Fracking Superhero Mark Ruffalo

A chat with anti-fracking campaigner and movie star Mark Ruffalo on on Gov. Cuomo?s shale gas ban.
Out There: A Picture Captures Plane...

Out There: A Picture Captures Planets Waiting to Be Born

Astronomers have obtained, in the image of the young star HL Tauri, what might be the best view yet of dust in the act of turning into planets.

Science Daily

Being humble: Research shows E.B. W...

Being humble: Research shows E.B. White was right in Charlotte's Web

Psychologists conducted a bottom-up exploration of what it really means to be humble. They found that people see a unique dimension of humility akin to a love of learning.
A clear, molecular view of how huma...

A clear, molecular view of how human color vision evolved

Many genetic mutations in visual pigments, spread over millions of years, were required for humans to evolve from a primitive mammal with a dim, shadowy view of the world into a greater ape able to see all the colors in a rainbow. Now, after more than two decades of painstaking research, scientists have finished a detailed and complete picture of the evolution of human color vision.
Ability to balance on one leg may r...

Ability to balance on one leg may reflect brain health, stroke risk

Struggling to stand on one leg for less than 20 seconds was linked to an increased risk for stroke, small blood vessel damage in the brain, and reduced cognitive function in otherwise healthy people, a study has shown. One-legged standing time may be a simple test used to measure early signs of abnormalities in the brain associated with cognitive decline, cerebral small vessel disease and stroke.
Most commonly prescribed glaucoma d...

Most commonly prescribed glaucoma drug reduces risk of vision loss by more than 50% over 2 years

?Medication to lower raised eye pressure has been used for decades as the main treatment for OAG to delay progressive vision loss. But, until now, the extent to which the most frequently prescribed class of pressure-lowering drugs (prostaglandin analogues) have a protective effect on vision was not known," explains the lead author of a new study. ?Our findings offer solid proof to patients and practitioners that the visual deterioration caused by glaucoma can be reduced using this treatment.?
Doctor who survived Ebola received ...

Doctor who survived Ebola received experimental drug treatment

On 28 September, 2014, the 38-year old doctor, who was in charge of an Ebola virus treatment unit in Lakka, Sierra Leone, developed a fever and diarrhea. He tested positive for the virus on the same day. The doctor was airlifted to Frankfurt University Hospital on the 5th day of his illness and admitted to a specialized isolation unit. Within 72 hours of admission he developed signs of vascular leakage and severe multi-organ failure, including the lungs, kidneys, and gastrointestinal tract. He was placed on a ventilator and on kidney dialysis, and was given antibiotics together with a 3-day course of an experimental drug called FX06?a fibrin-derived peptide that has been shown to reduce vascular leakage and its complications in mice with Dengue hemorrhagic shock.
Signs of Europa plumes remain elusi...

Signs of Europa plumes remain elusive in search of Cassini data

A fresh look at data collected by NASA's Cassini spacecraft during its 2001 flyby of Jupiter shows that Europa's tenuous atmosphere is even thinner than previously thought and also suggests that the thin, hot gas around the moon does not show evidence of plume activity occurring at the time of the flyby. The new research provides a snapshot of Europa's state of activity at that time, and suggests that if there is plume activity, it is likely intermittent.

Eureka Alert

Andrew W. Mellon Foundation grants ...

Andrew W. Mellon Foundation grants CMU $2 million to transform education in Humanities

(Carnegie Mellon University) The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation has awarded Carnegie Mellon University a five-year, $2 million grant to use technology-enhanced learning to transform and enhance graduate education in the humanities. With a well-established legacy of pioneering technology-enhanced learning and through its Simon Initiative, a strategic, university-wide commitment to use technology-enhanced learning to improve learning outcomes for all students, Carnegie Mellon is uniquely positioned to advance digital scholarship and technology-enhanced learning in the humanities.
AGU talk: Scaling climate change co...

AGU talk: Scaling climate change communication for behavior change

(Stanford University) Stanford University researchers have developed two curricula for Girl Scouts to use energy more efficiently: one on energy use at home, and the other in transportation and food. Both courses were effective for girls in the short term, and the home energy course was effective for girls in the long term and for parents in the short term. This AGU talk will describe deployment of the curricula to Girl Scout troop leaders via a massive open online course.
High socioeconomic status increases...

High socioeconomic status increases discrimination, depression risk in black young adults

(Massachusetts General Hospital) An investigation into factors related to disparities of depression in young adults has found that higher parental education -- which has a protective effect for white youth -- can also increase the risk of depression for black youth by increasing the discrimination they experience.
UTSA and UTHSCSA researchers awarde...

UTSA and UTHSCSA researchers awarded $1.9M to discover novel breast cancer therapies

(University of Texas at San Antonio) Stanton McHardy, associate professor of chemistry and director of the Center for Innovative Drug Discovery in The University of Texas at San Antonio College of Sciences, is partnering on a $1.9 million award to develop next-generation breast cancer treatment drugs. McHardy will collaborate with Rong Li, professor of molecular medicine in the Cancer Treatment Research Center at the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio.
Public opinion in Russia: Russians'...

Public opinion in Russia: Russians' attitudes on economic and domestic issues

(NORC at the University of Chicago) A poll of the Russian public, conducted by The Associated Press-National Opinion Research Center for Public Affairs Research, was released today. The poll, which includes a nationally representative in-person survey of 2,008 Russian adults taken between November 22 and December 7, 2014, found that President Vladimir Putin is extremely popular.
Study finds Illinois is most critic...

Study finds Illinois is most critical hub in food distribution network

(University of Illinois College of Engineering) Illinois is the most critical hub in the network of US domestic food transfers, according to a new study at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. According to the report, the US food network moves more than 400 million tons of food annually. Of that total, more than 70 million tons are transported through Illinois, the most of any state in the nation.

Forteantimes

Thur 20 Nov - Daily round-up of the...

Thur 20 Nov - Daily round-up of the world's weird news

Young boy claimed to be reincarnated Marine, four armed baby named God Boy by parents, Bumfight punk body part theft
Mon 17 Nov - Daily round-up of the ...

Mon 17 Nov - Daily round-up of the world's weird news

Philly Jesus goes ice skating, gets arrested, plus: human flesh pastry makers, Swastika bauble outrage and a pair of resurrections
Mon 10 Nov - Daily round-up of the ...

Mon 10 Nov - Daily round-up of the world's weird news

Quadruple amputee is armed and on the run; Man buys home, finds corpse inside; dowsers discover mass grave in Tunbridge Wells
Wed 29 Oct - Daily round-up of the ...

Wed 29 Oct - Daily round-up of the world's weird news

London museum planned to shoot and steal Nessie, Iceland offers Minge Pies for Christmas, plus a ghost in the bathtub
Mon 27 Oct - Daily round-up of the ...

Mon 27 Oct - Daily round-up of the world's weird news

Literary argument ends in death, tiger sex spoof video nightmare, man calls suicide hotline and is shot dead by SWAT team
Thur 23 Oct - Daily round-up of the...

Thur 23 Oct - Daily round-up of the world's weird news

Sex toy clown attack, Hitler coffee creamer PR disaster, man fights off bear with old computer, return of the Swedish mystery subs

Howstuffworks

The Most Embarrassing Moments in th...

The Most Embarrassing Moments in the History of Science

What? Scientists get things wrong? We know. It?s shocking to hear, but science isn?t always an exact science. Mistakes do happen -- and they often lead to great scientific discoveries. So, grab your safety glasses and see if you can identify the most embarrassing scientific moments ever.
10 Completely False ?Facts? Everyon...

10 Completely False ?Facts? Everyone Knows

The blood in your veins is blue. Glass is a slow-moving liquid. If you touch a baby bird, its mother will abandon it. Not so fast ?- if you learned any of those "facts" in school, what you learned was wrong.
Flight Pictures

Flight Pictures

Flight pictures show photos from aviation history. Take a look at pictures of the most important aircraft in history.
How the Electoral College Works

How the Electoral College Works

The Electoral College is not an Ivy League school. Rather, it's a process for selecting the next U.S. president that actually carries more weight than the popular vote. Why is it there and should it be continued?
What is a Nor'easter?

What is a Nor'easter?

Nor'easters typically affect the east coast of the United States during the winter season. What exactly are Nor'easters, though, and how do they form. Find out the answer to this question in this article from HowStuffWorks.

Unexplained-mysteries

Mystery diamond-filled rock found i...

Mystery diamond-filled rock found in Russia

A strange chunk of rock containing 30,000 individual diamonds has been unearthed in a Russian mine. The red and green tinted rock, which was found in ...
Scientists challenge 'Yeti' DNA res...

Scientists challenge 'Yeti' DNA results

DNA thought to be from an extinct polar bear in the Himalayas might actually belong to something else. Professor Bryan Sykes made headlines last year ...
Million-mummy cemetery discovered i...

Million-mummy cemetery discovered in Egypt

Archaeologists have been excavating a gigantic burial site containing up to one million mummies. The cemetery, which is known as Fag el-Gamous (Way of...
Clay seals may prove existence of K...

Clay seals may prove existence of King David

Six clay seals unearthed in Israel could prove that Kings David and Solomon actually existed. For years scholars have dismissed these two biblical fig...
Has Curiosity found evidence of lif...

Has Curiosity found evidence of life on Mars?

NASA's exploratory rover has discovered mysterious 'belches' of methane gas on the surface of Mars. Methane is a particularly important find because o...
Mystery Kalachi sleep epidemic cont...

Mystery Kalachi sleep epidemic continues

Villagers in a remote Kazakhstan village are still inexplicably falling asleep for days at a time. The peculiar malady, which has afflicted as many as...

Sciencenewsforkids.org

Virus blamed in starfish die-off

Virus blamed in starfish die-off

A virus may explains the deaths of millions of starfish along the Pacific Coast of North America. The deaths affect 20 species. Some of the stricken animals appear to melt into puddles of slime.
Soot fouls subway stations ? and ma...

Soot fouls subway stations ? and maybe lungs

Soot levels in stations for New York City?s electric subway trains exceed the levels outdoors, a new study finds. The underground source of this black carbon: maintenance trains that share the tracks with subway trains. Breathing soot can aggravate asthma and other lung disease.
Nano air pollutants strike a blow t...

Nano air pollutants strike a blow to the brain

Most people think that air pollution poses the biggest risk to our lungs. In fact, pollution hits the brain too, sometimes by traveling a direct route ? through our noses. These tiny pollutants can harm IQ and more.
Questions for Nano Air Pollutants S...

Questions for Nano Air Pollutants Strike a Blow to the Brain

Classroom questions for Nano Air Pollutants Strike a Blow to the Brain
Banned drug reduces brain communica...

Banned drug reduces brain communication

Illegal drugs called ?bath salts? can reduce communications among different brain regions. New research, done in rats, may explain the violent and unpredictable behavior seen in some people using these drugs.
Scents may affect how appealing tob...

Scents may affect how appealing tobacco is

Menthol?s effects on the brain may make tobacco more addicting. In contrast, foul odors might help smokers quit. Two new studies show how.

PopSci

There are no news from this channel.

Science News.org

There are no news from this channel.
Dec 19      Hits : 20695
place your ad here
My News Hub