Discovery

Heavy Snow Boosts Flooding Risk for...

Heavy Snow Boosts Flooding Risk for New York State

Record-breaking snowfall that buried towns near Buffalo, New York, and killed at least 14 people posed a major flooding threat Saturday with temperatures forecast to rise.
What Warming Means for Lake Effect ...

What Warming Means for Lake Effect Snow

Global warming could fuel more lake effect snows like the one that buried Buffalo, at least for awhile. Continue reading ‚??
Chemical Change Causing Lakes to Ge...

Chemical Change Causing Lakes to Get Gooey

Acid rain and deforestation runoff are causing a drop in the calcium content of some lakes in North America and western Europe, with ominous potential effects. Continue reading ‚??
Poo Power Fuels New UK Bus

Poo Power Fuels New UK Bus

The U.K.'s new 'Bio-Bus' carries 40 people and is powered by biomethane, produced by human and food waste.
It's Chilly, But Record Cold Years ...

It's Chilly, But Record Cold Years Are Gone

2014 is even more likely to become the warmest year on record, with record cold years a thing of the past.
Satellite Shows Frigid Arctic Air O...

Satellite Shows Frigid Arctic Air Over Eastern US

A new satellite photo shows the eastern United States locked in a cold front's icy grip.

Yahoo Science

Multi-national crew reaches space s...

Multi-national crew reaches space station

ISS crew Shkaplerov matches palm with his daughter Kira from a bus window before the launch of the Soyuz-FG rocket at the Baikonur cosmodromeBy Irene Klotz (Reuters) - A Russian Soyuz rocket blasted off from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazahkstan on Sunday to deliver three new crew members to the International Space Station, including Italy's first female astronaut. A Soyuz capsule carrying incoming station commander Terry Virts from U.S. space agency NASA, Soyuz commander Anton Shkaplerov from the Russian Federal Space Agency and first-time flier Samantha Cristoforetti of the European Space Agency lifted off at 2101 GMT (4.01 p.m. EST) Sunday. ...

Deregulation at heart of Japan's ne...

Deregulation at heart of Japan's new robotics revolution

Japan's robot venture company Cyberdyne's Lower Limb Model HAL (Hybrid Assistive Limb) for welfare use is seen next to a laptop showing HAL monitor, which indicates signals of users including the center point of the balance, shift of the center point of thBy Sophie Knight and Kaori Kaneko TOKYO (Reuters) - Neurosurgeon Tetsuya Goto had just begun testing a robot to perform brain surgery when he discovered Japan was moving to tighten regulations that would shut down his seven-year project. † † Over the next dozen years he watched in frustration as the da Vinci, a rival endoscopic robot that U.S. regulators had already approved, became a commercial success while his and other Japanese prototypes languished in laboratories. ...

'Star-gazing' shrimp discovered in ...

'Star-gazing' shrimp discovered in South Africa

JOHANNESBURG (Reuters) - A tiny shrimp equipped with large, candy-striped eyes to ward off predators has been discovered in South African waters, the University of Cape Town said on Friday. The 10-15 mm-long crustacean has been christened the "star-gazer mysid" as its eyes seem to gaze permanently upwards. Similar to insects' eyes, they each look in a different direction. "The vivid ringed patterns are thought to be there to make the eyes appear to belong to a much bigger creature, and hence to scare off predators," the university said. ...
Banking culture breeds dishonesty, ...

Banking culture breeds dishonesty, scientific study finds

By Kate Kelland LONDON (Reuters) - - A banking culture that implicitly puts financial gain above all else fuels greed and dishonesty and makes bankers more likely to cheat, according to the findings of a scientific study. Researchers in Switzerland studied bank workers and other professionals in experiments in which they won more money if they cheated, and found that bankers were more dishonest when they were made particularly aware of their professional role. ...
Want to live on the 'roof of the wo...

Want to live on the 'roof of the world'? Grow barley

Handout photo of a modern-day barley harvest in QinghaiBy Will Dunham WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The Tibetan Plateau, the harsh Asian domain known as the 'roof of the world,' would not seem an ideal place for people to call home thanks to its extreme altitude, frigid temperatures, relentless winds and low-oxygen conditions. When people did succeed in colonizing this remote land, it was only after they discovered how to feed themselves year-round with cold-hardy crops like barley brought to the region from far away, scientists said on Thursday. ...

Lifesaving Beats: Songs Can Help wi...

Lifesaving Beats: Songs Can Help with CPR Training

The familiar tune of the Bee Gees song "Stayin' Alive" has been used for medical training for quite a few years now: It has the right beat ? not to mention, the perfect title ? for providing CPR's chest compressions at the right pace to revive a patient. The 1977 hit song†has a rhythm of 103 beats per minute (bpm), which is close to the recommended rate of at least 100 chest compressions per 60 seconds that should be delivered during CPR. In fact, the American Heart Association (AHA) officially recommends that if you see someone collapse, you should "call 9-1-1 and push hard and fast in the center of the chest to the beat of the classic disco song "Stayin' Alive." The AHA has gone as far as depicting the act in an educational music video†featuring comedian and physician Ken Jeong. But although the song seems to be the perfect soundtrack for CPR, it does have some drawbacks.

Physorg.com

Can stress management help save hon...

Can stress management help save honeybees?

Honeybee populations are clearly under stress?from the parasitic Varroa mite, insecticides, and a host of other factors?but it's been difficult to pinpoint any one of them as the root cause of devastating and unprecedented losses in honeybee hives. Researchers writing in the Cell Press journal Trends in Parasitology on November 24th say that the problem likely stems from a complex and poorly understood interplay of stresses and their impact on bee immunity and health. It's a situation they suspect might be improved through stress management and better honeybee nutrition.
Time in space exposes materials to ...

Time in space exposes materials to the test of time

Much like that pickup truck rusting in your backyard thanks to time, rain and the elements, extended stays in the brutal environment of space can take its toll on spacecraft, satellites and space stations. In fact, anything outside the protective blanket of our atmosphere can be assaulted by orbital debris, temperature extremes, micrometeoroids, direct sunlight and, when spacecraft are in low-Earth orbit (LEO) or orbiting near another planet like Mars, atomic oxygen. Over time this relentless hammering by the space environment degrades many spacecraft materials.
Italian natural history museums on ...

Italian natural history museums on the verge of collapse?

Are Italian natural history museums (NHMs) on the verge of collapse? A new analysis published in the open access journal ZooKeys points out that these institutions are facing a critical situation due to progressive loss of scientific relevance, decreasing economic investments and scarcity of personnel.
Avoiding ecosystem collapse

Avoiding ecosystem collapse

From coral reefs to prairie grasslands, some of the world's most iconic habitats are susceptible to sudden collapse due to seemingly minor events. A classic example: the decimation of kelp forests when a decline of otter predation unleashes urchin population explosions. Three studies published in the Nov. 24 special issue of Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society Biological Science hold the promise of helping resource managers predict, avoid, and reverse the tipping points that lead to degraded habitats, economic losses, and social upheaval.
Cell's skeleton is never still: Sci...

Cell's skeleton is never still: Scientists model dynamic instability of microtubules

New computer models that show how microtubules age are the first to match experimental results and help explain the dynamic processes behind an essential component of every living cell, according to Rice University scientists.
New volume documents the science at...

New volume documents the science at the legendary snowmastodon fossil site in Colorado

Four years ago, a bulldozer operator turned over some bones during construction at Ziegler Reservoir near Snowmass Village, Colorado. Scientists from the Denver Museum of Nature & Science were called to the scene and confirmed the bones were those of a juvenile Columbian mammoth, setting off a frenzy of excavation, scientific analysis, and international media attention. This dramatic and unexpected discovery culminates this month with the publication of the Snowmastodon Project Science Volume in the international journal Quaternary Research.

PBS

Spinosaurus vs. Alligator

Spinosaurus vs. Alligator

A tame alligator named Bubba betrays the secrets of the largest predator that ever lived.
Killer Landslides

Killer Landslides

Explore the forces behind deadly landslides?and the danger zones for the next big one.
Zombies and Calculus

Zombies and Calculus

The zombie apocalypse is here, and calculus explains why we can't quite finish them off.
Zombies and Calculus, Part 2

Zombies and Calculus, Part 2

You're being chased by zombies, and understanding tangent vectors may save your life.
Bigger Than T. rex

Bigger Than T. rex

Meet ?the lost killer of the Cretaceous and the world's largest predator ever.
Emperor's Ghost Army

Emperor's Ghost Army

Explore the buried clay warriors, chariots, and bronze weapons of China's first emperor.

Scientific American

How Doctors Determine the Moment of...

How Doctors Determine the Moment of Death [Excerpt]

The definition of death is hazy but important for medical decisions, explains Harvard neurologist Allan Ropper in the new book Reaching Down the Rabbit Hole   -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
A Day in the Life of an Ebola Worke...

A Day in the Life of an Ebola Worker

Denial, violence and fear make it difficult to stamp out Ebola in west Africa -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
Artificial Intelligence That Perfor...

Artificial Intelligence That Performs Real Magic Tricks [Video]

AI helps mechanical magicians fool human spectators -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
Electron Beam Points to Origins of ...

Electron Beam Points to Origins of Teotihuacan Stone Faces

New microscope analysis of artifacts from the ancient city also can find fakes in museums -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
Never Mind Philae?s Topsy-Turvy Tou...

Never Mind Philae?s Topsy-Turvy Touchdown, Its Brief Mission Advances Comet Science

Even the lander’s missteps generated valuable data -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
Congress?s ?Rocket Scientist? to Ta...

Congress?s ?Rocket Scientist? to Take Helm of World?s Largest Science Organization

Rep. Rush Holt on science in Congress: “There are some real frustrations. I’ll leave it at that” -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

Newscientist

Simply the biggest: The great dam o...

Simply the biggest: The great dam of China

The superlatives fly when it comes to the Three Gorges, but is it delivering the promised benefits? New Scientist travelled down the Yangtze to find out (full text available to subscribers)
I'm cracking the future of food ? n...

I'm cracking the future of food ? no chickens required

Egg-free mayonnaise is just the first in a line of eco-friendly products from Josh Tetrick's company, Hampton Creek. But what is the secret ingredient?
Us vs universe: Seeing smaller than...

Us vs universe: Seeing smaller than the limit of light

Stefan Hell's microscope sees things that light waves should be too clumsy to reveal ? and it won him this year's chemistry Nobel (full text available to subscribers)
Violence ahead as tragedies of the ...

Violence ahead as tragedies of the commons spread

The world risks heading the way of Easter Island†? a spiral into conflict as depleted natural resources are plundered, warns Petros Sekeris
Total white out: Snowshoe hares vs ...

Total white out: Snowshoe hares vs global warming

Removing their white winter coat once kept snowshoe hares hidden in spring, but as the snows melt earlier, they are increasingly exposed. Can they fight back? (full text available to subscribers)
Us vs universe: Adventures in break...

Us vs universe: Adventures in breaking light speed

It's the ultimate speed limit ? but in some places, it seems the cosmic traffic cops are letting things slip (full text available to subscribers)

NY times.com Science

Willy Burgdorfer, Who Found Bacteri...

Willy Burgdorfer, Who Found Bacteria That Cause Lyme Disease, Is Dead at 89

Dr. Burgdorfer?s familiar finding while conducting tick surgery solved the mysteries of an ailment that had affected scores of people.
Climate Change Threatens to Strip t...

Climate Change Threatens to Strip the Identity of Glacier National Park

In a century, the number of glaciers in Montana?s Glacier National Park, on the Canadian border, has dropped to about 25 from 150.
Despite Persecution, Guardian of La...

Despite Persecution, Guardian of Lake Tai Spotlights China?s Polluters

Despite pressure from Beijing, factories continue to dump toxic waste into waterways because the cost of violating the rules is lower than the cost of compliance.
Notable Absence of New Ebola Quaran...

Notable Absence of New Ebola Quarantines at New York Area Airports

Since a nurse flew into Newark?s airport on Oct. 24 and was kept at a hospital for three days, no one else has been caught up in the quarantine dragnet at the New York and New Jersey airports.
A Power Plant in California Goes Qu...

A Power Plant in California Goes Quiet, but the Stacks Still Tower

In Morro Bay, three smokestacks from a power plant share the scenery with a mountain of volcanic rock, and will probably not be going anywhere soon.
Solar and Wind Energy Start to Win ...

Solar and Wind Energy Start to Win on Price vs. Conventional Fuels

The cost of electricity from wind and solar power plants has plummeted, making it cheaper than coal or natural gas in some places.

Science Daily

How the hummingbird achieves its ae...

How the hummingbird achieves its aerobatic feats

Although hummingbirds are much larger and stir up the air more violently as they move, the way that they fly is more closely related to flying insects than it is to other birds. Now, the most detailed, three-dimensional aerodynamic simulation of hummingbird flight conducted to date has definitively demonstrated that the hummingbird achieves its nimble aerobatic abilities through a unique set of aerodynamic forces that are more closely aligned to those found in flying insects than to other birds.
Theater arts research offers insigh...

Theater arts research offers insight for designers, builders of social robots

Researchers have provided insight into human behavior for scientists, engineers who design and build social robots.
Rejecting unsuitable suitors is eas...

Rejecting unsuitable suitors is easier said than done

Rejecting unsuitable romantic partners is easy in hypothetical situations, but not so when considering a face-to-face proposition, a new study shows. ?When actually faced with a potential date, we don't like to reject a person and make them feel bad, which is not necessarily something that people anticipate when they imagine making these choices,? says the study?s lead researcher.
New terahertz device could strength...

New terahertz device could strengthen security

We are all familiar with the security hassles that accompany air travel. Now a new type of security detection that uses terahertz radiation is looking to prove its promise. Researchers have developed a room temperature, compact, tunable terahertz source that could lead to advances in homeland security and space exploration. Able to detect explosives, chemical agents and dangerous biological substances from safe distances, devices using terahertz waves could make public spaces more secure than ever.
Self-regulation intervention boosts...

Self-regulation intervention boosts school readiness of at-risk children, study shows

An intervention that uses music and games to help preschoolers learn self-regulation skills is helping prepare at-risk children for kindergarten, a new study shows. Self-regulation skills -- the skills that help children pay attention, follow directions, stay on task and persist through difficulty -- are critical to a child's success in kindergarten and beyond, said a co-author of the new study.
Anti-HIV medicines can cause damage...

Anti-HIV medicines can cause damage to fetal hearts, research shows

New research raises concern about potential long-term harmful impact of 'antiretroviral therapy' on in-utero infants whose mothers are HIV-positive, but who are not infected with HIV themselves. The study shows that while the HIV medications have been successful in helping to prevent the transmission of the virus from mother to infant, they are associated with persistently impaired development of heart muscle and reduced heart performance in non-HIV-infected children whose mothers received the medicines years earlier.

Eureka Alert

Elsevier announces launch of new jo...

Elsevier announces launch of new journal: Current Opinion in Food Science

(Elsevier) Elsevier, a world-leading provider of scientific, technical and medical information products and services, is pleased to announce the launch of the latest title in the Current Opinion journal series: Current Opinion in Food Science.
ASU, IBM move ultrafast, low-cost D...

ASU, IBM move ultrafast, low-cost DNA sequencing technology a step closer to reality

(Arizona State University) A team of scientists from Arizona State University's Biodesign Institute and IBM's T.J. Watson Research Center have developed a prototype DNA reader that could make whole genome profiling an everyday practice in medicine. "Our goal is to put cheap, simple and powerful DNA and protein diagnostic devices into every single doctor's office," said Stuart Lindsay, an ASU physics professor and director of Biodesign's Center for Single Molecule Biophysics. Such technology could help usher in the age of personalized medicine.
Teens prescribed anxiety, sleep med...

Teens prescribed anxiety, sleep medications likelier to illegally abuse them later

(University of Michigan) The medical community may be inadvertently creating a new generation of illegal, recreational drug users by prescribing anti-anxiety or sleep medications to teenagers, say University of Michigan researchers.
Too much turkey: What happens when ...

Too much turkey: What happens when you overeat? (video)

(American Chemical Society) The season of giving is often also the season of over-indulging at the dinner table. As Thanksgiving approaches, Reactions takes a look down at our stomachs to find out what happens when you overeat. Put on your 'eating pants' and enjoy the video here:http://youtu.be/7VJ4cRWCpDw.
AAAS and University of South Florid...

AAAS and University of South Florida announce 2014 Fellows

(University of South Florida (USF Innovation)) Five faculty members from the University of South Florida in Tampa have been named Fellows of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS). Election as an AAAS Fellow is an honor bestowed upon AAAS members by their peers. This year, 401 members from 196 universities and organizations have been awarded this honor by AAAS because of their scientifically or socially distinguished efforts to advance science or its applications.
G20 talk fest echoed on Twitter

G20 talk fest echoed on Twitter

(Queensland University of Technology) Brisbane's G20 Leaders' Summit proved a Twitter talk fest, attracting 1.02 million tweets since October 23.Almost half of those tweets mentioned the US delegation in some form, making President Barack Obama the most talked about leader during Brisbane's G20 Leaders' Summit.

Forteantimes

Thur 20 Nov - Daily round-up of the...

Thur 20 Nov - Daily round-up of the world's weird news

Young boy claimed to be reincarnated Marine, four armed baby named God Boy by parents, Bumfight punk body part theft
Mon 17 Nov - Daily round-up of the ...

Mon 17 Nov - Daily round-up of the world's weird news

Philly Jesus goes ice skating, gets arrested, plus: human flesh pastry makers, Swastika bauble outrage and a pair of resurrections
Mon 10 Nov - Daily round-up of the ...

Mon 10 Nov - Daily round-up of the world's weird news

Quadruple amputee is armed and on the run; Man buys home, finds corpse inside; dowsers discover mass grave in Tunbridge Wells
Wed 29 Oct - Daily round-up of the ...

Wed 29 Oct - Daily round-up of the world's weird news

London museum planned to shoot and steal Nessie, Iceland offers Minge Pies for Christmas, plus a ghost in the bathtub
Mon 27 Oct - Daily round-up of the ...

Mon 27 Oct - Daily round-up of the world's weird news

Literary argument ends in death, tiger sex spoof video nightmare, man calls suicide hotline and is shot dead by SWAT team
Thur 23 Oct - Daily round-up of the...

Thur 23 Oct - Daily round-up of the world's weird news

Sex toy clown attack, Hitler coffee creamer PR disaster, man fights off bear with old computer, return of the Swedish mystery subs

Howstuffworks

The Most Embarrassing Moments in th...

The Most Embarrassing Moments in the History of Science

What? Scientists get things wrong? We know. It?s shocking to hear, but science isn?t always an exact science. Mistakes do happen -- and they often lead to great scientific discoveries. So, grab your safety glasses and see if you can identify the most embarrassing scientific moments ever.
10 Completely False ?Facts? Everyon...

10 Completely False ?Facts? Everyone Knows

The blood in your veins is blue. Glass is a slow-moving liquid. If you touch a baby bird, its mother will abandon it. Not so fast ?- if you learned any of those "facts" in school, what you learned was wrong.
Flight Pictures

Flight Pictures

Flight pictures show photos from aviation history. Take a look at pictures of the most important aircraft in history.
How the Electoral College Works

How the Electoral College Works

The Electoral College is not an Ivy League school. Rather, it's a process for selecting the next U.S. president that actually carries more weight than the popular vote. Why is it there and should it be continued?
What is a Nor'easter?

What is a Nor'easter?

Nor'easters typically affect the east coast of the United States during the winter season. What exactly are Nor'easters, though, and how do they form. Find out the answer to this question in this article from HowStuffWorks.

Unexplained-mysteries

'Black seadevil' filmed for the fir...

'Black seadevil' filmed for the first time

A rare and elusive species of deep-sea fish has been captured on camera off the coast of California. With its pitch black skin, a mouth full of sharp ...
Scientists set to grow food crops i...

Scientists set to grow food crops in space

Researchers are investigating the viability of growing enough food in space to sustain long missions. Lead by a team in Norway, the new 10-year progra...
Modern day Atlantis may be possible...

Modern day Atlantis may be possible by 2030

A Japanese construction company is planning to build underwater complexes that corkscrew in to the ocean. Shimizu Inc. is pursuing a rather unique sol...
14 students 'possessed' in the Phil...

14 students 'possessed' in the Philippines

A case of mass hysteria is thought to be responsible for rendering several students unconscious. The incident, which was initially blamed on possessio...
Pink Cliffs could hold key to Mars ...

Pink Cliffs could hold key to Mars mystery

Curiosity has located a ledge of rocks that could hold important clues about the origins of the planet. After more than two years trundling across the...
'Underwater Pompeii' found off Gree...

'Underwater Pompeii' found off Greek island

Archaeologists have uncovered the remains of a small settlement at the bottom of the ocean near Delos. The ancient ruins, which are located just 6ft u...

Sciencenewsforkids.org

IQ is in the genes

IQ is in the genes

Previous research that suggested parenting affects a child?s IQ is flawed, researchers now conclude.
The secret of fast runners: symmetr...

The secret of fast runners: symmetry

Science had shown that animals and people with symmetrical bodies tend to be stronger and healthier. Now researchers find they can predict the best sprinters by measuring the top runners? knees.
Wind power is looking up ? to the c...

Wind power is looking up ? to the clouds

Placing wind turbines high in the sky could let them harvest power from the faster, more reliable winds found at altitude.
Questions for Wind Power Is Looking...

Questions for Wind Power Is Looking to the Clouds

Classroom questions for Wind power is looking up ? to the clouds.
Lightning strikes will surge with c...

Lightning strikes will surge with climate change

Warming temperatures will lead to 50 percent more lightning strikes across the 48 U.S. states in the next century, researchers report. That increase could lead to more warming, more fires and even more deaths.
Artificial sweeteners pollute strea...

Artificial sweeteners pollute streams

Fake sugars sweeten foods without adding calories. But most pass right through the body, down the toilet, into water treatment plants ? and from there, right into lakes and streams.

PopSci

There are no news from this channel.

Science News.org

There are no news from this channel.
Nov 24      Hits : 20442
place your ad here
My News Hub