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Warriors beat Thunder 116-108 in fr...

Warriors beat Thunder 116-108 in front of star-studded crowd

Tonight at Oracle Arena in Oakland the Dubs beat the Thunder 116-108 in front of a number of celebrities who came to see them play.
Jon Jones to return April 23 for Da...

Jon Jones to return April 23 for Daniel Cormier rematch at UFC 197

Jon Jones, who was stripped of his light heavyweight title last April and suspended due to disciplinary reasons, will make his return against Daniel Cormier on April 23 at UFC 197 in Las Vegas.
Brett Favre, Ken Stabler, Marvin Ha...

Brett Favre, Ken Stabler, Marvin Harrison among Hall's 2016 class

Quarterbacks Brett Favre and Ken Stabler and receiver Marvin Harrison headline the Pro Football Hall of Fame's eight-member class of 2016. They will be formally inducted in Canton on Aug. 6.
Cam Newton named NFL MVP; Ron River...

Cam Newton named NFL MVP; Ron Rivera wins coach of year

On the eve of Super Bowl 50, Panthers quarterback Cam Newton was named NFL MVP and Offensive Player of the Year, while Ron Rivera earned coach of the year honors.
North Korea Successfully Launches L...

North Korea Successfully Launches Long-Range Missile, U.S. Officials Confirm

US officials confirmed that North Korea has launched a long-range missile.
J.J. Watt wins record-tying 3rd Def...

J.J. Watt wins record-tying 3rd Defensive Player of the Year award

Texans DE J.J. Watt tied Lawrence Taylor by winning his third Defensive Player of the Year award. Eric Berry (comeback) and Todd Gurley (offensive rookie) also were among the big winners.

CBS5

Beyonce, Jay Z Spotted At Warriors ...

Beyonce, Jay Z Spotted At Warriors Game At Oracle On Super Bowl 50 Eve

Jay-Z and wife Beyonce sits courtside during an NBA basketball game between the Oklahoma City Thunder and Golden State Warriors at ORACLE Arena.  (Photo by Thearon W. Henderson/Getty Images)Superstars Beyonce and husband Jay Z were in the house Saturday night at Oracle Arena as the Warriors battled Oklahoma.
DeBartolo, Stabler Elected To Pro F...

DeBartolo, Stabler Elected To Pro Football Hall Of Fame

Atlanta Falcons v San Francisco 49ersFormer San Francisco 49ers owner Edward DeBartolo Jr., who guided his team to five Super Bowl victories, has been elected to the NFL Hall of Fame.
Thousands Of Fans Shut Out As SFPD ...

Thousands Of Fans Shut Out As SFPD Closes Gates To Super Bowl City

Locked out fans on one side, police on the other, after the gates to Super Bowl City were closed. (CBS)Super Bowl City reached full capacity Saturday afternoon, forcing police to close the entrance to scores of fans who wanted in.
Mathews, Brown Lead California Past...

Mathews, Brown Lead California Past Stanford 76-61

Cal Coach Cuonzo Martin/Getty ImagesKameron Rooks had career highs of 11 points and 12 rebounds, Jordan Mathews scored 18 points and California ended a four-game losing streak to Stanford, beating the Cardinal 76-61 Saturday.
Expert Medical Teams Will Man Super...

Expert Medical Teams Will Man Super Bowl 50 Sidelines

CHARLOTTE, NC - NOVEMBER 11: A general view of the Denver Broncos versus the Carolina Panthers during their game at Bank of America Stadium on November 11, 2012 in Charlotte, North Carolina. (Photo by Streeter Lecka/Getty Images)On Super Bowl Sunday, it's not just the Carolina panthers or Denver Broncos who will show jaw-dropping skills, incredible strength and super human speed.
StubHub Says Lowest Price For Super...

StubHub Says Lowest Price For Super Bowl 50 Ticket Is $3,000

Broncos Fan Gets Super Bowl TicketsThe lowest ticket price for Sunday's Super Bowl is $3,000, the average is nearer to $5,000 and prices are holding steady.

KTVU

Was this high school football playe...

Was this high school football player flagged for praying?

Celebrations after scoring a touchdown are nothing new in the game of football, but league officials on every level warn: just don't get excessive with it. 

And it's the definition of what makes for an "excessive celebration" that has people upset in southern Florida. (Video via Fort Myers News-Press

As you saw, that celebration lasted just a few seconds, but it earned Fort Myers senior tight end Sam Turner a penalty.

And Turner isn't happy about the 15-yard penalty. He says he was praying. 

SAM TURNER VIA WINK: "Eventually the ref came up and talked to me. He said I was trying to bring attention to myself. And I was trying to explain to him I wasn't trying to bring attention to myself, I was just trying to thank God." 

Turner also says he was honoring his former teammate Jo Jo Brunson, who was killed in a drive-by shooting last year.

The Florida High School Athletic Association and the South Gulf Football Officials Association are standing by the referee's call, though. 

According to the National Federation of State High School Associations and highlighted by the Fort Myers News-Press, "any delayed, excessive or prolonged act by which a player attempts to focus attention upon himself" will result in an unsportsmanlike conduct penalty. A spokesperson for FHSAA called the ref's flag a "judgement call."

Even Turner's coach said he could see both sides and supported both his player and the refs. According to WJXX, he said: "It comes down to a ref's discretion. To them, they try to follow the letter of the rules. You accept both sides." 

In the NFL, a similar situation occurred earlier this year when Kansas City Chiefs safety Husain Abdullah ran back an interception for a touchdown and then dropped to one knee in prayer. Abdullah was flagged for that play, although after the game, the NFL said the official shouldn't have penalized him

Although Turner says he was unhappy about the penalty at the time, he's at least understanding about it and credits his teammates for picking him back up. That was Turner's first touchdown of the season. 

Couple selling home for $1, you jus...

Couple selling home for $1, you just have to move it

We've heard of getting a good deal on a home, but this is a one-of-a-kind deal! 

JULIE HENRY VIA WFTS: "One dollar."

BOB HENRY: "One dollar, yeah. And, honestly, that's negotiable." 

Did we mention you'll have to spend an estimated $130,000 to move it, though? 

So the Henrys bought the Sarasota, Florida, home and lot for $605,000 months ago without seeing it first. When they finally did see it, they decided the home just wasn't for them. 

BOB HENRY VIA WFTS: "It's got a lot of history to it, and we thought, well, why don't we see if we can't find somebody that would like to salvage this home and move it?"

They still like the lot and don't want to see the house demolished. They want someone to literally move the house. And that won't be easy. 

AOL writes the house is "too tall and too wide to roll down local streets. So the new owner must take off the roof, saw it in half or in thirds, and move it at 3 a.m. so local police can hold up traffic lights and power lines as the house rolls to its new home."

All of that, according to the real estate agent representing the home, will cost about $130,000.

Located at 1215 Pomelo Ave., the house resides in one of the area's more historic locations and sits within walking distance of the Sarasota Bay. 

The Sarasota Herald-Tribune explains the home used to belong to the Silvertooth family. Lynn N. Silvertooth was a prominent judge in the area, and the Sarasota County Judicial Center is named for him. 

The Henrys say they want the house to be moved by the end of the year so they can start on their new home in February. If a buyer doesn't move it, they say, it will have to be demolished. So who can give them a lift?

 

Minor killed by BART train in San L...

Minor killed by BART train in San Leandro

A minor died Thursday after being struck by a BART train at the commuter line’s San Leandro station, officials said.

According to BART spokeswoman Alicia Trost, the incident was reported at about 9:30 a.m. involving a Daly City-bound train and caused major delays in the East Bay.

Emergency crews rushed to the station but could not save the minor whose body was trapped under a train.

A bus bridge was being set up for passengers at station.

No other information was immediately available.

Review: 'Interstellar'

Review: 'Interstellar'

A knockout one minute, a punch-drunk crazy film the next, "Interstellar" is a highly stimulating mess. Emotionally it's also a mess, and that's what makes it worth its 165 minutes — minutes made possible by co-writer and director Christopher Nolan's prior global success with his brooding, increasingly nasty "Batman" films, and with the commercially viable head-trip that was "Inception."

 You can call "Interstellar" corny or reiterative or just plain daunting, and you'd be right. It is those things. It is hobbled by astronomy and physics seminars disguised as dialogue. But even with its vividly realized imaginings of journeys through a worm hole, or its depiction of the largest tidal wave in the history of water, what I remembered first the following morning was this: Matthew McConaughey's character crying his eyes out as he watches years and years of backlogged video messages left by his son back on Earth. Simple, elemental human feeling. More directors should try it sometime.

Co-written by Jonathan Nolan, Christopher's brother, the film is caked with the dust of death and bereavement, yet it posits that love is stronger than gravity, relativity, and even ordinary blockbuster imperatives. "2001: A Space Odyssey" may be the director's touchstone, but Nolan's own galaxy quest is as warm and fuzzy as Stanley Kubrick's vision was stoically indifferent to the plight of humankind.

The starting point is conventional enough. We're on a farm somewhere in America (played by locations in Alberta — apparently the Canadian tax breaks never end). The only crop is corn, and the so-called "blight" has ravaged the global food supply. The planet's time is nearly up. McConaughey plays Cooper, a frustrated farmer trained as a test pilot who lives with daughter Murph (Mackenzie Foy), son Tom (Timothee Chalamet) and father-in-law Donald (John Lithgow, whose stage-trained diction makes the naturalistic McConaughey drawl all the more pronounced). One of the upstairs bedrooms, lined with bookshelves, appears to be haunted by benign, book-tossing ghosts. Surely there's an explanation.

One night, somewhere near their homestead, Cooper and Murph stumble onto the secret underground location of what's left of NASA, where a project headed up by the eminent Prof. Brand (Michael Caine, Nolan's go-to purveyor of mellow wisdom) intends to find a home for Earth's inhabitants before the clock runs out. Cooper qualifies as the right flyboy for this crucial space exploration mission. Destination: a wormhole near Saturn. On the other end of the wormhole, what? A new home? A new set of troubles?

The first really good scene in "Interstellar" reminds us that Nolan can pull off dramatically flamboyant tricks in style. Cooper will be lost in space for years, maybe forever. His kids, especially Murph, don't want him to go. He does, though, to try to save the planet. The farewell on the farm is an anguished one, and cleverly pushing the time-acceleration idea, Nolan intercuts it with the countdown and liftoff of the spaceship helmed by Cooper. His fellow adventurers include Brand's daughter, Amelia (Anne Hathaway), the tremulous astrophysicist Romilly (David Gyasi), the snappish scientist Doyle (Wes Bentley) and two geometric widget-y robots voiced by Bill Irwin and Josh Stewart.

The film takes the time and the narrative space to explore several worlds. One is wet, dominated by inhospitably crushing mountain-sized ocean waves; another is pure ice, where even the clouds above are snow chunks. In one of the script's more usefully provocative notions, time on the water-logged planet proceeds at seven years per human hour. I love this bit; it's instantly graspable, and frightening, cutting to the heart of Nolan's obsession with time lost, time spent and misspent. This goes back to "Memento," a fleet-footed brain-scrambler from the other end of the wormhole of this filmmaker's career.

Every temporal aspect of existence bends and twists in "Interstellar." There's not much room for the usual conflict and resolution, and for a daring portion of the film Nolan manages to make a sincere science-fiction epic without an antagonist, only a tangle of conflicting intentions. As adults, Cooper's children are played by Jessica Chastain and Casey Affleck, and as they age back on Earth, Cooper wonders if he did the right thing leaving them (not really a moral dilemma — the fate of the planet's hanging in the balance), or if he'll ever see them again.

How these questions are answered in the film's final 45 minutes will likely toss half of any given audience right off the bus. I sympathize. Yet I found myself hanging on, through the film's several endings, and even the endings beyond those endings. This is a movie unabashedly earnest in its intention to awe. It's certainly the first science-fiction film to combine relativity theory with a line about burying grandpa "out in the back 40." The Nolan brothers' screenplay asks only that we, the awed, or the partly awed and partly confused, embrace family and our time on Earth, or wherever we end up. It's the same plea made by writers as diverse as Charles Dickens and Thornton Wilder. While I devoutly wish Nolan had sent composer Hans Zimmer and his droning, thundering score into deep space, I'm glad we live in a world where a fabulously successful director can retain his ambition, even at the expense of clarity.

Sixty-six minutes of "Interstellar" were filmed with 70 millimeter Imax cameras; all of it was filmed on celluloid, as opposed to digitally, and the visual results carry a rougher, grainier quality than you typically see in space epics. The same is true of the movie's most nakedly expressive scenes, which have nothing to do with how special the effects are (and they're pretty special). When McConaughey breaks down watching years-old messages from his son, he weeps. And even Zimmer's music backs down, allowing the scene to breathe, play out and — like the best of this crazy, mixed-up, heartfelt endeavor — matter.

New malware targets iOS devices, hi...

New malware targets iOS devices, hits third-party app users

Security company Palo Alto Networks reports a piece of malware is targeting Apple devices in China.

The virus is called WireLurker, and in six months, it infected more than 400 OS X applications. Palo Alto Networks says those infected apps have racked up more than 350,000 downloads through a third-party app store in China.

"The viruses can then get transferred from infected Macs onto iPhones through USB connector cables. Palo Alto Networks thinks the attackers were Chinese and says most of the users were hit in China thus far." (Video via CNBC)

WireLurker is also notable because it doesn't require jailbroken targets. It's the first iOS malware known to use enterprise provisioning, which lets companies distribute software and apps without app store approval.

Once it's installed, WireLurker has full access to user data stored on the phone, but, as far as Palo Alto Networks knows, it so far hasn't done anything with that access. Palo Alto Networks researcher Ryan Olson told PCWorld:

"We think we sort of caught someone developing the attack, and they haven't gotten to the point of launching the full attack. From our perspective, it still looks like an information gathering operation," Olson said.

There's no such thing as perfect security from this or any other sort of malware, but the refrain from across the Web is a familiar one:

MacRUMORS: "Users should not download and run Mac apps or games from third-party app stores, download sites, or other untrusted sources and jailbreaking should be avoided."

In a statement to TechCrunch, Apple said it was aware of the malware problem, "and we've blocked the identified apps to prevent them from launching." It, too, recommended sticking to trusted sources for app downloads.

This video includes images from Getty Images.

KTVU Digital launches new website a...

KTVU Digital launches new website and apps

In our quest to bring you the latest breaking news from your hometown, the entire Bay Area and from around the country and world and KTVU News live via a 24-hour livestream, KTVU Digital is unveiling a new look and feel to our website and mobile apps on Thursday afternoon.

But we need your help. While the site and apps are well built, we want to take a page from the past and host a traditional barn-raising. We want your input as to what you would like to see in the final bricks and planks.

Please send us your comments to -- User comments. All your comments will be gathered and we will attempt to improve the look and feel of the website and apps over the coming months using your suggestions.

Over the next 24 hours, you will receive a notification from Google and Apple that an app update for your mobile phones and iPad are available. Simply click on the link and the new apps will be downloaded to your device.

Our old apps will remain live for about a week, but they will not be updated. For the latest news, you will need to update to the new apps.

If for some reason you don’t get a notification, below are the links to the Apple and Google stores when the new app can be downloaded for free.

DOWNLOAD the new KTVU News app on your mobile Android device.

DOWNLOAD the new KTVU News app on your iPad.

DOWNLOAD the new KTVU News app on your iPhone.

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