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NY Education

Statement from Chancellor Tisch and...

Statement from Chancellor Tisch and Commissioner King on Governor Cuomo's 2014-15 Budget Proposal

Statement from Chancellor Tisch and Commissioner King on Governor Cuomo's 2014-15 Budget Proposal
Newly Recovered Recording of Dr. Ma...

Newly Recovered Recording of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Speech

Board of Regents Chancellor Merryl H. Tisch and State Education Commissioner John B. King, Jr. today announced a new online exhibition on the New York State Museum's website featuring the only known audio recording of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.'s 1962 speech commemorating the centennial anniversary of the Preliminary Emancipation Proclamation. The online exhibition is available at: http://www.nysm.nysed.gov/mlk.
ESEA Waiver Renewal Application

ESEA Waiver Renewal Application

For Public Comment: Proposed Amendments to New York State's Approved Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) Flexibility Waiver for 2014-2015
RFP Released: 1003(g) School Improv...

RFP Released: 1003(g) School Improvement Grant (SIG) Round 5

The primary purpose of the SIG is to provide Local Education Agencies (LEAs) with an opportunity to support the implementation of a whole-school change model in its Priority Schools.
RFP Released: School Innovation Fun...

RFP Released: School Innovation Fund Grant (SIF) Round 3

The purposes of the School Innovation Fund are to increase high school graduation, college and career readiness of high school graduates, college persistence, and college graduation rates by increasing the availability of new high quality seats for students at most risk for dropout, disengagement, and poor academic performance.
Statement from Chancellor Tisch and...

Statement from Chancellor Tisch and Commissioner King on Governor Cuomo's State of the State Address

Statement from Chancellor Tisch and Commissioner King on Governor Cuomo's State of the State Address

InsidehigherEd

Struggling to find the right lesson...

Struggling to find the right lessons in tragedy (essay)

Susannah Clark wasn't sure how to help her students make sense of the Boston Marathon bombings -- but one of them bailed her out.

Essay on how to manage teaching-ori...

Essay on how to manage teaching-oriented postdoc programs

It's not enough to bring a new Ph.D. to campus and say "teach," writes Gary DeCoker. These young academics need a real plan and real mentors.

Essay on new college presidents who...

Essay on new college presidents who get their advice from the wrong people

When new presidents take office, they need to make judgments based on good information, or they will get rid of those they may most need, writes Tara M. Samuels.

Essay urges colleges to consider su...

Essay urges colleges to consider succession planning for CIOs

With a wave of retirements approaching, higher education needs to consider how to prepare the next generation of technology leaders, write Jerome P. DeSanto and Robyn L. Dickinson.

Essay on being an unemployed young ...

Essay on being an unemployed young scholar in social sciences

Todd K. Platts finished his Ph.D., started publishing and earned good teaching reviews. Why is a job impossible to find?

Essay on mentorship styles in highe...

Essay on mentorship styles in higher education

Cheryl E. Ball explains how a recent online debate missed truly important issues about mentorship.

 

BBC News Education

Wilshaw takes charge of Trojan Hors...

Wilshaw takes charge of Trojan Horse

Ofsted chief Sir Michael Wilshaw is to take personal charge of the watchdog's investigation into claims that a number of schools in Birmingham have been taken over by Muslim hardliners.
Teachers' election year strike thre...

Teachers' election year strike threat

The NASUWT teachers' union warns of industrial action in the run up to next year's general election.
Menopause 'worse' in too warm schoo...

Menopause 'worse' in too warm schools

High temperatures, poor ventilation and lack of drinking water in schools make the menopause particularly tough for teachers, the NUT has heard.
Teachers warn of CCTV intrusion

Teachers warn of CCTV intrusion

Teachers are warning that CCTV safety cameras are being misused by senior staff as a way of spying on lessons.
Teachers put strike vote on hold

Teachers put strike vote on hold

The NUT conference rejects calls for a four-day autumn strike, but could still press for a summer classroom walk-out
Hunt warns against schools extremis...

Hunt warns against schools extremism

Labour's Tristram Hunt has told teachers in Birmingham that there is no place for "cultural or gender segregation" in schools.

US Govt Dept of Education

5 Things To Consider When Taking Ou...

5 Things To Consider When Taking Out Student Loans

Obama Administration Approves NCLB ...

Obama Administration Approves NCLB Flexibility Request for Illinois

The Obama administration today approved Illinois for a waiver from the No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB), in exchange for state-developed plans to prepare all students for college and careers, focus aid on the neediest students and support effective teaching and leadership.
Bringing the Tech Revolution to Ear...

Bringing the Tech Revolution to Early Learning

Why do I advocate for ?early tech?? I?ll give you three good reasons: my granddaughters Ella, Clara, and Zayla. I?ve seen the way technology has helped them to take charge of their own learning and opened doors to subjects and activities that really catch their interest.
Early Screening is Vital to Childre...

Early Screening is Vital to Children and their Families

The Unity Sunshine Program
Teen Dating Violence and Sexual Ass...

Teen Dating Violence and Sexual Assault in Schools: Resources and a Call to Action

Every year, about 1 in 10 American teenagers experiences physical violence at the hands of a boyfriend or girlfriend, and many others are sexually and emotionally abused. Dating violence can inflict long?lasting pain, putting survivors at increased risk of substance abuse, depression, poor academic performance, suicidal ideation, and future violence. The U.S.
Championing International Education...

Championing International Education Priorities

This past January, UN Secretary General Ban Ki-moon designated the U.S. as a Champion Country of the Global Education First Initiative (GEFI). The initiative aims to focus the world?s attention on three specific priorities: to put every child in school, improve the quality of learning and foster global citizenship.

Yahoo

Nigeria gunmen raze teachers reside...

Nigeria gunmen raze teachers residence at girls school

Nigeria police on April 28, 2011 during a security operation in Bauchi, the capital of Bauchi state, nothern NigeriaKano (Nigeria) (AFP) - Gunmen in northern Nigeria set fire to a staff residential building at a girls' secondary school on Sunday but the 195 students sleeping in their nearby dormitories were unharmed, police and a teacher said. The attack in Bauchi state came less than a week after Boko Haram Islamists kidnapped 129 teenage schoolgirls from the Chibok area of Borno state in the northeast. "At about 2:30 am (0130 GMT), unknown gunmen carried out coordinated attacks in Yana town," Bauchi's police spokesman Haruna Mohammed said. They burnt "several buildings including a staff quarters of a girls' secondary school, an eight-block police quarters, a sharia (Islamic law) court and the local government secretariat," he told AFP.


AP Top News at 7:45 a.m. EDT

AP Top News at 7:45 a.m. EDT

MOKPO, South Korea (AP) ? The confirmed death toll from South Korea's ferry disaster rose past 50 on Sunday as divers finally found a way inside the sunken vessel, quickly discovering more than a dozen bodies in what almost certainly is just the beginning of a massive and grim recovery effort. About 250 people are still missing from the ship, the vast majority of them high school students who had been on a holiday trip. Anguished families, waiting on a nearby island and fearful they might be left without even their loved ones' bodies, have vented their fury, blocking the prime minister's car during a visit and attempting a long protest march to the presidential Blue House.
AP Top News at 7:40 a.m. EDT

AP Top News at 7:40 a.m. EDT

MOKPO, South Korea (AP) ? The confirmed death toll from South Korea's ferry disaster rose past 50 on Sunday as divers finally found a way inside the sunken vessel, quickly discovering more than a dozen bodies in what almost certainly is just the beginning of a massive and grim recovery effort. About 250 people are still missing from the ship, the vast majority of them high school students who had been on a holiday trip. Anguished families, waiting on a nearby island and fearful they might be left without even their loved ones' bodies, have vented their fury, blocking the prime minister's car during a visit and attempting a long protest march to the presidential Blue House.
AP Top News at 7:35 a.m. EDT

AP Top News at 7:35 a.m. EDT

MOKPO, South Korea (AP) ? The confirmed death toll from South Korea's ferry disaster rose past 50 on Sunday as divers finally found a way inside the sunken vessel, quickly discovering more than a dozen bodies in what almost certainly is just the beginning of a massive and grim recovery effort. About 250 people are still missing from the ship, the vast majority of them high school students who had been on a holiday trip. Anguished families, waiting on a nearby island and fearful they might be left without even their loved ones' bodies, have vented their fury, blocking the prime minister's car during a visit and attempting a long protest march to the presidential Blue House.
Top Asian News at 11:30 a.m. GMT

Top Asian News at 11:30 a.m. GMT

MOKPO, South Korea (AP) ? The confirmed death toll from South Korea's ferry disaster rose past 50 on Sunday as divers finally found a way inside the sunken vessel, quickly discovering more than a dozen bodies in what almost certainly is just the beginning of a massive and grim recovery effort. About 250 people are still missing from the ship, the vast majority of them high school students who had been on a holiday trip. Anguished families, waiting on a nearby island and fearful they might be left without even their loved ones' bodies, have vented their fury, blocking the prime minister's car during a visit and attempting a long protest march to the presidential Blue House.
AP Top News at 7:31 a.m. EDT

AP Top News at 7:31 a.m. EDT

MOKPO, South Korea (AP) ? The confirmed death toll from South Korea's ferry disaster rose past 50 on Sunday as divers finally found a way inside the sunken vessel, quickly discovering more than a dozen bodies in what almost certainly is just the beginning of a massive and grim recovery effort. About 250 people are still missing from the ship, the vast majority of them high school students who had been on a holiday trip. Anguished families, waiting on a nearby island and fearful they might be left without even their loved ones' bodies, have vented their fury, blocking the prime minister's car during a visit and attempting a long protest march to the presidential Blue House.

Independent

Teachers: ?Our pupils are targeting...

Teachers: ?Our pupils are targeting us? with more than a quarter victims of abuse on social media

Teachers are facing an increasing barrage of ?vile? sexual abuse, unfair allegations of incompetence and videos of themselves taken without their consent being posted online by their pupils, according to a report seen by The Independent.








Ofsted head Sir Michael Wilshaw tak...

Ofsted head Sir Michael Wilshaw takes charge of Birmingham ?Islamist? schools inquiry

The Chief Inspector of Schools, Sir Michael Wilshaw, is to take personal charge of the investigation into claims that Muslim hardliners have taken over a number of schools in Birmingham and begun segregating boys and girls in class.








Spying on teacher: CCTV in classroo...

Spying on teacher: CCTV in classrooms 'on the rise'

CCTV cameras are increasingly being used in schools to ?spy? on staff as they take lessons, a teachers? conference is to be told today.








NUT teachers? union set to strike i...

NUT teachers? union set to strike in the summer term in latest fightback at Michael Gove

Teachers? leaders last night called for a major stepping-up of strike action against school reforms by the Secretary of State for Education, Michael Gove, by threatening a nationwide walkout from the classroom this summer term.








School strikes: NUT teachers' union...

School strikes: NUT teachers' union to vote on major escalation in action against Michael Gove's hated school reforms

Teachers will back a major escalation of their strike action over Education Secretary Michael Gove's school reforms by threatening further nationwide walkouts from schools in the summer term.








School strikes: NUT to vote on majo...

School strikes: NUT to vote on major escalation in action against Michael Gove's hated school reforms

Teachers will back a major escalation of their strike action over Education Secretary Michael Gove's school reforms by threatening further nationwide walkouts from schools in the summer term.








Education Week

Five Critical Conditions That Encou...

Five Critical Conditions That Encourage School Improvement

In order to prepare students to be productive, forward-thinking individuals, districts must offer a range of accessible, high-quality, innovative schooling options, writes Heather Zavadsky.
Michelle Obama: High school diploma...

Michelle Obama: High school diploma is not enough

Education chief: Testing critics do...

Education chief: Testing critics don't have plan

Del. school board eyes charter scho...

Del. school board eyes charter school issues

Okla. House Democrats call for educ...

Okla. House Democrats call for education funding

Juvenile-Justice System Not Meeting...

Juvenile-Justice System Not Meeting Educational Needs, Report Says

A new report cites inaccurate assessments of the needs of students entering the system, poor coordination between teaching and learning, and inconsistency in curricula as significant problems.

Educause

The Role of Campus Leadership in En...

The Role of Campus Leadership in Ensuring IT Accessibility

“Everyone should have an opportunity to participate in higher education.”

With those words, Michael K. Young, President of the University of Washington, opens a new video from his institution’s AccessComputing Project, IT Accessibility: What Campus Leaders Have to Say. Developed with support from the National Science Foundation, this video presents university presidents, chief information officers, and other higher education leaders who stress the importance to higher education of accessibility for persons with disabilities, and of having campus technology environments that support it.

read more

The Game is Changing. What Will Be ...

The Game is Changing. What Will Be Expected of You?

“When we were doing our studies for the National Academies, the typical first response of university presidents or CFOs or provosts was to say: ‘I understand things are changing very rapidly, but I'll ask my CIO to take care of it. The CIO usually can.’ We would then ask: ‘Suppose you wake up in the morning and come in to your office and nothing works anymore. You can't access e-mail. All of your course systems have collapsed. Who fixes the problem?’ They begin to scratch their heads, and pretty soon it's like the five phases of grief. They start off with denial and anger, move through bargaining and depression, and finally reach acceptance.” — James J. Duderstadt, Change and the Research University

read more

The Top-Ten IT Issues, 2012

The Top-Ten IT Issues, 2012

EDUCAUSE Top 10 IT Issues, 2012

The EDUCAUSE annual publication of top IT issues has long resonated as a yearly snapshot of the most pressing issues for IT leaders in higher education. At the top of list for 2012:

  1. Updating IT professionals’ skills and roles to accommodate emerging technologies and changing IT management and service delivery models
  2. Supporting the trends toward IT consumerization and bring-your-own device
  3. Developing an institution-wide cloud strategy

 

Below are the EDUCAUSE Review article summarizing the IT Issues Panel's findings for 2012 and accompanying resources.

read more

Tune In June 5 -- Rolling Out a BYO...

Tune In June 5 -- Rolling Out a BYOD (Bring Your Own Device) Program

This free hour-long session, “Rolling Out a BYOD (Bring Your Own Device) Program,” will offer ideas, sample policy statements and guidelines, and lessons learned for campuses interested in implementing a BYOD strategy for mobile devices on campus.

Those unable to attend may wish to visit the archives after the event or browse related resources.

Interact on Twitter at #EDULive.

read more

Get Involved with EDUCAUSE -- Volun...

Get Involved with EDUCAUSE -- Volunteer Submissions Are Due June 1

As someone who has a vested interest in higher education IT, you are part of a dynamic and close-knit community where we share new ideas, network with peers, and work toward the common good of the profession.

EDUCAUSE provides opportunities to be an active member by volunteering in a variety of roles, either short- or long-term, throughout the year. These opportunities include:

read more

Is Agile the Future of Project Mana...

Is Agile the Future of Project Management?

Gartner predicts that by the end of 2012, agile development methods will be used on 80 percent of all software development projects. Project Management Institute’s research shows that agile project management tripled from December 2008 to May 2011, and can help decrease product defects, improve team productivity, and increase business value.

Read the latest article release on agile project management from the Project Management Institute.

To help you apply project management processes at your organization, EDUCAUSE members have access to a selection of professional development resources:

read more

Huffingtonpost.com

Miss America: Don't Suspend Teen Ov...

Miss America: Don't Suspend Teen Over Prom Invite

YORK, Pa. (AP) ? Miss America is asking a Pennsylvania school district to reconsider the punishment of a senior who asked her to prom during the question-and-answer portion of an assembly.

The York Dispatch reported Sunday (http://bit.ly/1iBazDw) that Nina Davuluri posted a statement on the Miss America Organization's Facebook page saying she contacted Central York High School to ask officials to rethink the three-day in-school suspension issued to 18-year-old Patrick Farves. Davuluri says her travel schedule will prevent her from attending the dance with Farves.

School officials knew Farves intended to ask her to prom and warned him not to do it. Fellow students cheered afterward, but Farves was suspended for misbehaving.

He apologized for disrupting Thursday's event. Davuluri was there to talk about the importance of science, technology, engineering and math studies.

___

Information from: The York Dispatch, http://www.yorkdispatch.com
Why Doesn't the New York Times

Why Doesn't the New York Times Understand the Controversy Over Common Core?

In story after story, the New York Times consistently misses the essence of the controversy surrounding Common Core.



Sunday's New York Times gives its lead article on page 1, column right, top of the fold, to the battle raging within the Republican Party, about the Common Core. On one side is Jeb Bush, standing up for the Common Core standards (presumably a moderate, let's not talk about his fight for vouchers and for the destruction of public education in Florida), while on the other are figures like Ted Cruz and other extremists of the party. Common Core, we are told, is now the "wedge issue" in the Republican party, with sensible people like Jeb Bush fending off the extremists.



A few weeks ago, the newspaper wrote an editorial enthusiastically endorsing the Common Core standards, while giving no evidence for its enthusiasm other than the promises offered by the advocates of Common Core.



Story after story has repeated the narrative invented by Arne Duncan, that the only opponents of the Common Core are members of the Tea Party and other extremists.



Occasionally a story will refer to extremists of the right and the left, as though no reasonable person could possibly doubt the claims made on behalf of the Common Core.



Of course, David Brooks' column on Friday echoed the now familiar trope of the Times, that only extremists could oppose this worthy and entirely laudable endeavor.



Missing is any acknowledgement of the many researchers who have challenged the wacky assumption that standards alone will cause everyone's achievement to rise higher and higher, despite no evidence for this assertion.



Missing is any recognition that there are reputable educators and scholars and parents who are disturbed either by the substance of the standards or by the development process (Anthony Cody, for example, just won the Education Writers Association's first prize award for his series of blogs challenging the claims of the Common Core).



Missing is the pushback from teachers that caused the leaders of the NEA and the AFT to call for a slowdown in implementation of the standards (the media sees this only as teachers' fear of being evaluated by tests).



Missing is the concern of early childhood educators about the developmental inappropriateness of the standards for the early grades, which reflects the fact that no early childhood educator participated in drafting the standards. Also missing from the writing group was any educator knowledgeable about children with disabilities or English language learners.



Missing is any acknowledgement that not a single classroom teacher was included in the small group that wrote the standards, and that the largest contingent on the "working groups" was from the testing industry.



Missing is any suggestion that the writing of the standards was not "state-led," but was the product of a small group of insider organizations inside the Beltway, heavily funded by one organization, the Gates Foundation.



Missing is any recognition that there is no appeals process, no means to revise standards that make no sense when applied in real classrooms with real students.



Missing is any awareness that the Obama administration made eligibility for $4.35 billion in Race to the Top funding contingent on state adoption of "college and career ready" standards, which turned out to be the Common Core standards. How else to explain their rapid adoption by 45 states?



Missing is any acknowledgement that there is very little connection between the quality of any state's standards and its performances on the NAEP, or that some states with standards higher than the Common Core dropped their proven standards so as to be eligible for the new federal funding.



Missing is any recognition that the Common Core standards are an essential ingredient in a Big Data plan that involves a multi-billion dollar investment in new hardware, new software, and new bandwidth for Common Core testing, all of which will be done (for no good reason) online.



Missing is the issue of value-added measurement of teachers and school-closings based on test scores, or the fact that major scholarly organizations (the American Educational Research Association, the National Academy of Education, and the American Statistical Association) have pointed out the inaccuracy and instability of VAM. Nor has it ever been reported by the Times that these same organizations have said that teachers' influence on variation in test scores ranges from 1-15 percent, with the influence of the family, especially family income and education, looming far larger.



Question: How can the nation's "newspaper of record" be so seriously indifferent to or ignorant of the major education issue of our day?

This Paralyzed Pit Bull Brings A Me...

This Paralyzed Pit Bull Brings A Message Of Perseverance To Patients

Therapy dogs are a wonderful part of the healing process for many patients, but Elsa, the paralyzed pit bull, is more than just furry comfort for the patients she visits -- she is a lesson in perseverance.

Elsa became paralyzed after a stroke, Global News reported. Now she and her owner, Kelly Dann of Vancouver, British Columbia, visit the GF Strong Rehabilitation Center once a week, where patients can spend time with the lovable pup who has been through the grueling process of rehabilitation therapy herself.

In 2010, Elsa was rescued by the British Columbia SPCA, along with 26 other dogs, from an abusive and cruel situation, according to The Furever Network. She was brought, malnourished and sick, to HugABull Rescue and Advocacy Society in Vancouver. Eventually, at 5 months old, the puppy was adopted by Dann and her husband Nik.

When Elsa was just over a year old, she suffered a spinal cord blockage resulting in paralysis. But, after 16 months of hard work and rehab, Elsa relearned how to walk (although she still needs the assistance of her "dog buggy" sometimes).

Now, Elsa is a certified pet visitation dog, bringing a message of hope to people recovering from serious injuries, Global News reported. Along with some sloppy dog kisses and a big pit bull smile.

"Initially I just wanted to keep Elsa active and stimulated after her stroke so this was a way for us to do something together," Dann told Global News. "And my hope was to maybe inspire some people that have gone through a similar situation as Elsa to never give up and hang in there."


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'Fun Home' Musical Shares Stage Wit...

'Fun Home' Musical Shares Stage With College Of Charleston's Gay Rights Debate


By Harriet McLeod

CHARLESTON, S.C., April 20 (Reuters) - Students at a South Carolina public university are snapping up tickets to the musical "Fun Home" after state lawmakers approved a proposed cut in school funding over the critically acclaimed lesbian memoir on which the musical is based.

Outraged over the proposed budget cut for the College of Charleston, which was triggered by a freshman reading assignment, the cast of the Pulitzer Prize-nominated show volunteered to put on two performances of selected songs from the musical at the college without pay.

Little more than a day after the box office for both Monday performances opened, 900 of the 1,500 available tickets had been sold for $10 or $15 apiece, a spokeswoman for the liberal arts college with 11,000 undergraduate students said on Friday.

"The legislature's punishment of the college for teaching 'Fun Home' just feels ridiculous," said Alison Bechdel, whose 2006 memoir recalls growing up a lesbian with a closeted gay father in rural Pennsylvania. She will be on hand for the performances on Monday.

In March, the Republican-controlled state House voted to slash the school's budget appropriation by $52,000, the amount the college spent on its summer reading program. The program included Bechdel's book, a bestseller that was nominated for a National Book Critics Circle Award, for incoming freshmen.

Republican Representative Garry Smith told Reuters he proposed the cut after a parent complained about the book's "graphic pictures of two females having sex" and because the college did not offer another choice for summer reading.

The school, whose founders in 1770 included three signers of the Declaration of Independence and three framers of the U.S. Constitution, has said participating in the summer reading program was optional.

The Republican-led Senate is now considering the cut, which critics have called an assault on academic freedom.

"I don't have a problem with their academic freedom but they're asking someone else to pay for it," said Smith, who accused the college of promoting a social agenda. "We want to send a message to the colleges and universities that their academic freedom comes with responsibility."

The College of Charleston has been buzzing with talk about gay rights ever since a faculty member, in response to the proposed spending cut, reached out to the creators of the recent Off Broadway musical.

The nine-member cast, which includes the Tony Award winner Michael Cerveris, offered to perform for free as educational outreach, "Fun Home" producer Barbara Whitman said.

The college has raised about $20,000 that will be used in addition to the ticket sale proceeds to cover food, lodging and travel expenses for the cast, said Todd McNerney, chairman of the college's department of theater and dance.

Also helping to fund the effort is a community foundation grant from the family of Harlan Greene, head of Special Collections at the college's library, who said the shows "will spark debate on an issue that has been bringing, frankly, all kinds of negative and hate-filled reaction."

Greene said the state's political stance on gay rights is similar to its resistance to racial integration in the 1950s and 1960s.

"A lot of southern demagogues at that time said we're not going to knuckle down, we're not going to obey the law of the land," he said. "It's the same exact thing that's happening with gay rights in the South."

In 2006, South Carolina voters approved an amendment to the state constitution that bans same-sex marriage.

(Editing by Barbara Goldberg and Tom Brown)
Bowdoin's Double Bogey

Bowdoin's Double Bogey

A year ago I published What Does Bowdoin Teach? Or, more precisely, my co-author Michael Toscano and I posted a 376-page obsessively-detailed campus tour, subtitled How A Contemporary Liberal Arts College Shapes Students. Those reading at the leisurely pace of a page a day should be finished by now.

WDBT was not a great hit with Bowdoin's president, Barry Mills, or for that matter with most of the students and faculty members. Some were offended. Mr. Mills took it as a personal affront. Nearly all the faculty publicly ignored it. The college's official stand was, in Mills's words, that we "attacked" Bowdoin, and that the attack was "mean spirited" and "personal."

But while many pretended to stay within the circled wagons, we kept hearing from those who sneaked out at dark to say, "You got it right!" "Keep it up!" And, "You don't know the half of it!"

Then last week President Mills announced that he is resigning -- at least a year earlier than he had planned and with nothing lined up, though he says he is not retiring. Mills said he is leaving because of his "affection for the college," and the Bowdoin trustees' statement says Mills was doing "what he thinks best for our College." Both statements suggest a resignation under pressure, but it is hard to know what the source of that might have been. I have no reason to think that WDBT had anything to do with it. But I would like to think that Bowdoin's board did eventually get around to reading our study. If so, it might have wondered why Mills was so grimly determined not to pay it any heed.

If this is the first you've heard of this controversy, there are two things you should know: the golf story and the game plan. The golf story is this. In 2010, an affluent New York businessman played a round of golf with President Mills. A month later, Mills gave a speech in which he caricatured the businessman as a bad sport, and an ignorant, boorish, and racist conservative. Mills then published his speech. The businessman read it and responded with an elegant essay of his own in the pages of The Claremont Review of Books, deflecting Mills' taunts mostly by demonstration of keen intelligence and social sophistication.

Mills didn't come off looking good from this and was even more irritated when a group of students invited the businessman -- Tom Klingenstein -- to campus to debate.

Now the game plan. At Tom's invitation, I joined him on that trip. I'd debated people on political correctness and the excesses of campus activism many times before; Tom hadn't. He wanted back-up. As it happened, Mills called the student organizer of the event "a traitor" and refused to come. We ended up talking with an auditorium of Bowdoin students for a few hours. They stoutly defended Mills's main idea: that the college gave them a perfectly good education and they weren't missing anything of value.

Could that be true? I launched What Does Bowdoin Teach? as an effort to find out. But as I told Tom at the outset, poring over the details of a curriculum, academic requirements, faculty appointments, research foci, official documents, the rules of student life, and all the other minutiae of a contemporary college would likely result in a study drier than the Sahara.

And WDBT is indeed exactly that. We dressed it up with palm trees at the beginning. Bill Bennett contributed a foreword and Tom added a "letter to the alumni." And I put aside the Saharan sand long enough to write an "interpretive preface" that calls Bowdoin out on some of its more egregious educational missteps. But after that come hundreds of pages of finely-sifted detail on who teaches what and why. You can learn about the college's internal battles over student unpreparedness and whether to require a foreign language. You can watch the rise in honors projects and the decline in survey courses.

It ain't the stuff that would set the world on fire. Yet it did. At least the parts of the world I spend my working life paying attention to. The report became a big deal in conservative circles as the first and so far only meticulously documented account of how a liberal arts college lost its way. Or, maybe better put, lost its educational way and yet prospered in every other way. For Bowdoin is a raging success by many standards. It has an endowment of over $1 billion; US News & World Report last year elevated it to fourth in the nation among selective liberal arts colleges; its applicants far outnumber the students it admits; it pays its faculty handsomely; and to the extent anyone can tell, its recent alumni do fine.

With that kind of record you might think Bowdoin could have smiled indulgently at our study and thanked us for our eccentric interest in obscure details of old catalogs, minutes of faculty meetings, and long-forgotten speeches. But instead Bowdoin went into full-scale alarm. We truly did touch a nerve. The interesting question is, "Which nerve?" Proposed study: Why Did Bowdoin Panic?

Part of the answer lies in how the report was received elsewhere. I've heard from faculty members and college administrators across the country who reacted, "This could just as easily have been written about us." Bowdoin felt singled out and its guilty response to much of what we said was a version of, "Why pick on us? Everybody does it."

That, of course, is the complaint of the driver pulled over for speeding. But it was exactly our point. We said that, for us, Bowdoin was only an example: small enough to study in depth, wealthy enough to fully realize its dreams of what a liberal arts college should do. What we hit upon, quite unexpectedly is that, at some level, Bowdoin has a bad conscience. It knows that it has made some wrong turns but it doesn't like hearing that from a stranger. Nor does it know how to get back on track.

This is American higher education today: an angry driver, lost and confused but too proud to stop and ask directions. "I'm not lost! I know exactly where I'm going!" And to prove it, that angry driver speeds up and zips past the next exit.

Bowdoin's confusions are too many to drop into a single final paragraph. They range from a truly chaotic curriculum; an overestimation of what students -- even very bright students -- know when they first arrive on campus; a series of hard-to-undo judgments that unbalanced the faculty in favor of highly-specialized researchers; a smothering embrace of identity politics; the elevation of political piety over intellectual freedom; a distaste for America's political traditions; and an over-the-top sexualization of campus life. These are interwoven in some surprising ways. I'll explain that in some further posts.
79-Year-Old Tony Boland Joins Eleme...

79-Year-Old Tony Boland Joins Elementary School Band

DUBUQUE, Iowa (AP) ? One member of the Kennedy Elementary School band in Dubuque brings a certain maturity to his playing.

That's because Tony Boland is a 79-year-old flute player.

Boland asked about joining the fifth graders in the band after volunteering at the school, which his grandchildren attended, for more than a decade. He helps children with their reading, noting he recalls struggling with his reading as a child.

He started playing the flute a number of years ago, when his wife suggested getting rid of their daughter's flute.

Boland knew that his progress would be slow unless he played with others.

"When you play alone, it's not as fast when you're playing in a band," he told the Telegraph Herald (http://bit.ly/RiiWKw).

Band director Brian Enabnit thought Boland would make a terrific addition to the band.

"He's great. He's encouraging to the students around him," Enabnit said.

Boland practices with the students weekly and performs with them regularly, including at the Dubuque Community School District's Band Festival earlier this month.

Fifth-grade student Courtney Less has been impressed by her older classmate.

"He's kind of a more experienced player," Courtney said. "All of us are messing up, but he doesn't."

___

Information from: Telegraph Herald, http://www.thonline.com

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